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Background: I'm building an automated test framework for a PHP application, and I need a way to efficiently "stub out" classes which encapsulate communication with external systems. For example, when testing class X that uses DB wrapper class Y, I would like to be able to "swap in" a "fake" version of class Y while running automated tests on class X (this way I don't have to do full setup + teardown of the state of the real DB as part of the test).

Problem: PHP allows "conditional includes", which means basically that include/require directives are handled as part of processing the "main" logic of a file, e.g.:

if (condition) {
    require_once('path/to/file');
}

The problem is that I can't figure out what happens when the "main" logic of the included file calls "return". Are all of the objects (defines, classes, functions, etc.) in the included file imported into the file which calls include/require? Or does processing stop with the return?

Example: Consider these three files:

A.inc

define('MOCK_Z', true);
require_once('Z.inc');
class Z {
    public function foo() {
        print "This is foo() from a local version of class Z.\n";
    }
}
$a = new Z();
$a->foo();

B.inc

define('MOCK_Z', true);
require_once('Z.inc');
$a = new Z();
$a->foo();

Z.inc

if (defined ('MOCK_Z')) {
    return true;
}
class Z {
    function foo() {
        print "This is foo() from the original version of class Z.\n";
    }
}

I observe the following behavior:

$ php A.inc
> This is foo() from a local version of class Z.

$ php B.inc
> This is foo() from the original version of class Z.

Why This is Strange: If require_once() included all of the defined code objects, then "php A.inc" ought to complain with a message like

Fatal error: Cannot redeclare class Z

And if require_once() included only the defined code objects up to "return", then "php B.inc" ought to complain with a message like:

Fatal error: Class 'Z' not found

Question: Can anyone explain exactly what PHP is doing, here? It actually matters to me because I need a robust idiom for handling includes for "mocked" classes.

share|improve this question
    
First off, I'm not sure exactly what you are trying to accomplish. Unit testing shouldn't need any hacky defines or conditional includes. But that aside, this is interesting dual behavior. Without the return, you'll get a duplicate class error. Not sure if the manual addresses this or not. –  Matthew Oct 29 '11 at 20:20
    
@Matthew - I was unable to find anything in the PHP manual which explains the behavior which I described in my OP (hence the question). As for unit testing and hacking includes, I have found that in practice it is far from easy to get more than very modest test coverage without injecting mock objects (aka test doubles) somehow, and since PHP doesn't make "monkey patching" very easy (like, say, Python) then I'm forced to choose between hacking includes, physically replacing files, and upend class hierarchies in order to achieve this. –  Peter Oct 29 '11 at 22:30

4 Answers 4

According to php.net, if you use a return statement, it'll return execution to script that called it. Which means, require_once will stop executing, but the overall script will keep running. Also, examples on php.net show that if you return a variable within an included file, then you can do something like $foo = require_once('myfile.php'); and $foo will contain the returned value from the included file. If you don't return anything, then $foo is 1 to show that require_once was successful. Read this for more examples.

And I don't see anything on php.net that says anything specifically about how the php interpreter will parse included statements, but your testing shows that it first resolves class definitions before executing code in-line.

UPDATE

I added some tests as well, by modifying Z.inc as follows:

    $test = new Z();
    echo $test->foo();
    if (defined ('MOCK_Z')) {
        return true;
    }
    class Z {
        function foo() {
            print "This is foo() from the original version of class Z.\n";
        }
    }

And then tested on the command line as follows:

    %> php A.inc
    => This is foo() from a local version of class Z.
       This is foo() from a local version of class Z.

    %> php B.inc
    => This is foo() from the original version of class Z.
       This is foo() from the original version of class Z.

Obviously, name hoisting is happening here, but the question remaining is why there are no complaints about re-declarations?

UPDATE

So, I tried to declare class Z twice in A.inc and I got the fatal error, but when I tried to declare it twice in Z.inc, I didn't get an error. This leads me to believe that the php interpreter will return execution to the file that did the including when a fatal runtime error occurs in an included file. That is why A.inc did not use Z.inc's class definition. It was never put into the environment, because it caused a fatal error, returning execution back to A.inc.

UPDATE

I tried the die(); statement in Z.inc, and it actually does stop all execution. So, if one of your included scripts has a die statement, then you will kill your testing.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your investigation, and for the "double declaration" experiment (which gives new and useful information). I agree that the lack of redeclaration error is mysterious. But I can't believe that PHP is "silently" returning from processing the include/require when it encounters a fatal error, since any fatal error ought to interrupt execution of the script (this is in fact the behavior you observed when you put a die(); statement in Z.inc). –  Peter Oct 29 '11 at 22:36
    
Yes, it is very strange. Unfortunately, it looks like php source-code investigation would be necessary to go further :( –  Ryan Oct 29 '11 at 23:59
    
+1 for at least taking a careful look and sharing your observations. –  Peter Oct 30 '11 at 1:30

Okay so behavior of the return statement in PHP included files is to return control to the parent in execution. That means the classes definitions are parsed and accessible during the compile phase. For instance, if you change the above to the following

a.php:

<?php
define('MOCK_Z', true);

require_once('z.php');

class Z {
    public function foo() {
        print "This is foo() from a local version of class Z in a.php\n";
    }
}

$a = new Z();
$a->foo();

?> 

b.php:

<?php

    define('MOCK_Z', true);
    require_once('z.php');
    $a = new Z();
    $a->foo();

?>

z.php:

<?php

if (defined ('MOCK_Z')) {
    echo "MOCK_Z definition found, returning\n";
    return false;
}

echo "MOCK_Z definition not found defining class Z\n";

class X { syntax error here ; }

class Z {
    function foo() {
        print "This is foo() from the original version of class Z.\n";
    }
}

?>

then php a.php and php b.php will both die with syntax errors; which indicates that the return behavior is not evaluated during compile phase!

So this is how you go around it:

z.php:

<?php

$z_source = "z-real.inc";

if ( defined(MOCK_Z) ) {
    $z_source = "z-mock.inc";
}

include_once($z_source);

?>

z-real.inc:

<?php
class Z {
    function foo() {
            print "This is foo() from the z-real.inc.\n";
        }
}

?>

z-mock.inc:

<?php
class Z {
    function foo() {
            print "This is foo() from the z-mock.inc.\n";
        }
}

?>

Now the inclusion is determined at runtime :^) because the decision is not made until $z_source value is evaluated by the engine.

Now you get desired behavior, namely:

php a.php gives:

Fatal error: Cannot redeclare class Z in /Users/masud/z-real.inc on line 2

and php b.php gives:

This is foo() from the z-real.inc.

Of course you can do this directly in a.php or b.php but doing the double indirection may be useful ...

NOTE

Having SAID all of this, of course this is a terrible way to build stubs hehe for unit-testing or for any other purpose :-) ... but that's beyond the scope of this question so I shall leave it to your good devices.

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your investigation. I agree that the included files are checked in some way - and syntax errors in them do indeed cause the inclusion (and script) to fail. But the included files are not "parsed" in the same way that PHP files are parsed when executed. If they were, then the "duplicate definition scenario" described in Ryan's answer would also cause the inclusion to fail, but it does not. –  Peter Oct 29 '11 at 22:45
    
On further study, PHP is exhibiting behavior that is COUNTER to what is expressed in the documentation. –  Ahmed Masud Oct 29 '11 at 23:19
    
+1 for digging deeper. Would you care to explain how the observed behavior contradicts the documentation? –  Peter Oct 30 '11 at 1:32
    
As to your remark about building stubs, I'll repeat to you what I wrote to Matthew: I have found that in practice it is far from easy to get more than very modest test coverage without injecting mock objects (aka test doubles) somehow, and since PHP doesn't make "monkey patching" very easy (like, say, Python) then I'm forced to choose between hacking includes, physically replacing files, and upend class hierarchies in order to achieve this. –  Peter Oct 30 '11 at 2:47

This is the closest thing I could find in the manual:

If there are functions defined in the included file, they can be used in the main file independent if they are before return() or after. If the file is included twice, PHP 5 issues fatal error because functions were already declared, while PHP 4 doesn't complain about functions defined after return().

And this is true regarding functions. If you define the same function in A and Z (after the return) with PHP 5, you'll get a fatal error as you expect.

However, classes seem to fall back to PHP 4 behavior, where it doesn't complain about functions defined after return. To me this seems like a bug, but I don't see where the documentation says what should happen with classes.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for checking. I agree that the documentation fails to clarify what the behavior ought to be, which is why I'm sure the Gods of PHP would deny that this is a bug. –  Peter Oct 29 '11 at 22:38
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I've thought about this for a while now, and nobody has been able to point me to a clear and consistent explanation for the way PHP (up to 5.3 anyway) processes includes.

I conclude that it would be better to avoid this issue entirely and achieve control over "test double" class substitution via autoloading:

[spl-autoload-register][1]

In other words, replace the includes at the top of each PHP file with a require_once() which "bootstraps" a class which defines the logic for autoloading. And when writing automated tests, "inject" alternative autoloading logic for the classes to be "mocked" at the top of each test script.

It will naturally require a good deal of effort to modify existing code to follow this approach, but the effort appears to be worthwhile both to improve testability and to reduce the total number of lines in the codebase.

EDIT: For some reason, SO isn't rendering the above link correctly, so here are a couple of "raw" URL strings:

http://php.net/manual/en/language.oop5.autoload.php
http://php.net/manual/en/function.spl-autoload-register.php
share|improve this answer
    
Another approach is to use an Inversion of Control framework (like Dice) to take care of autoloading and make Dependency Injection easier to implement without getting bogged down in the courier anti-pattern. –  Peter Oct 20 '13 at 1:29

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