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Should be an easy one for you guys.....

I'm playing around with tokenizers using Boost and I want create a token that is comma seperated. here is my code:

    string s = "this is, , ,  a test";
boost::char_delimiters_separator<char> sep(",");
boost::tokenizer<boost::char_delimiters_separator<char>>tok(s, sep);


for(boost::tokenizer<>::iterator beg= tok.begin(); beg!=tok.end(); ++beg)
{
    cout << *beg << "\n";
}

The output that I want is:

This is


 a test

What I am getting is:

This
is
,
,
,
a
test

UPDATED

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Similar to this question: If I have this is,,,a test and cout << "<" << *beg << "> "; modified in your code, how do I get empty strings too, as <this is> <> <> <a string>? –  thedarkside ofthemoon Mar 11 at 16:52
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1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You must give the separator to tokenizer!

boost::tokenizer<boost::char_delimiters_separator<char>>tok(s, sep);

Also, replace the deprecated char_delimiters_separator with char_delimiter:

string s = "this is, , ,  a test";
boost::char_separator<char> sep(",");
boost::tokenizer< boost::char_separator<char> > tok(s, sep);
for(boost::tokenizer< boost::char_separator<char> >::iterator beg = tok.begin(); beg != tok.end(); ++beg)
{
    cout << *beg << "\n";
}

Please note that there is also a template parameter mismatch: it's good habit to typedef such complex types: so the final version could be:

string s = "this is, , ,  a test";
boost::char_separator<char> sep(",");
typedef boost::tokenizer< boost::char_separator<char> > t_tokenizer;
t_tokenizer tok(s, sep);
for (t_tokenizer::iterator beg = tok.begin(); beg != tok.end(); ++beg)
{
    cout << *beg << "\n";
}
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Duh, thanks!!!!! –  Lexicon Oct 29 '11 at 21:16
    
also, Now my output separates by comma AND spaces,I want to ignore spaces and I don't want to include the comma in the output (see updated question above)... –  Lexicon Oct 29 '11 at 21:18
1  
instead of typedefing things just to use iterators you can use auto –  Dani Oct 31 '11 at 1:30
    
@Dani, actually you can't. auto is valid only in c++11 standard –  gg.kaspersky Dec 10 '13 at 12:12
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