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I am currently creating a C# application that supports MySQL and MSSQL databases. The problem I am having is with my wrapper. I have my code working for MySQL, but I am having issues modifying it to support multiple databases.

If you take a look at a stripped down version of my code you will see I have a dbConn object of type DBMySQL, which is fine if I only want MySQL Support. I need modify DBMySQL to be something generic so that I can run dbConn = new DBMySQL(...) and dbConn = DBMSSQL(...) and then I can simply call dbConn.SomeMethod() and have it work on the appropriate database. I would prefer to keep this same setup as much as possible as I have other things in my DBMySQL and DBMSSQL classes for bulk inserting into databases and specific error checking.

I was thinking / trying to declare something like Object dbConn, then manipulating that, but that did not go so well. Then I tried to use an enum class of object types, but I had issues with that as well. I know there are many third party libraries that do all of this but I would prefer to use my own code.

Does anyone have any suggestions how I might modify my DBWrapper to solve this problem?

//WRAPPER CLASS THAT CALLS DBMySQL, ISSUE IS I NOW NEED TO SUPPORT 
//DBMSSQL as well, not just DBMySQL
class DBWrapper
{
    DBMySQL dbConn;

    public DBWrapper(...,string type)
    {
        if(type.Equals("MySQL")
        {
            dbConn = new DBMySQL(...);
        }
        //NEED TO REWORK TO SUPPORT THIS BELOW!!
        else if(type.Equals("MSSQL")
        {
            //NEED TO MODIFY TO SUPPORT MSSQL
            //ISSUE IS DbConn is of type DBMySQL
            //SO I CANNOT GO
            // DbConn = new DBMSSQL(...);
            // any ideas?
        }   
    }

    public void setQuery(string myquery)
    {
            dbConn.setQuery(myquery);
    }
}

class DBMySQL
{
    public string dbinfo;
    string query;

    public DBMySQL(...)
    {
        dbinfo = ...;

    }

    public void setQuery(...)
    {
        query = myquery;
    }
}

//NEED TO RE-WORK WRAPPER TO SUPPORT THIS
class DBMSSQL
{
    public string dbinfo;
    string query;

    public DBMSSQL(...)
    {
        dbinfo = ...;

    }

    public void setQuery(...)
    {
        query = myquery;
    }
}

At this point I would appreciate any help at all, so if you are viewing this post and have an idea, please let me know as I have already spent all day on this.

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This problem could be solved using Factory Method design pattern, take a look here –  sll Oct 30 '11 at 20:09

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

What you need is to create interface which would describe what you want your data access classes to do.

E.g. from your sample

public interface IDBAccess
{
     void setQuery(...);
}

public class DBMySQL : IDBAccess
{
    public string dbinfo;
    string query;

    public DBMySQL(...)
    {
        dbinfo = ...;

    }

    public void setQuery(...)
    {
        query = myquery;
    }
}

public class DBMSSQL : IDBAccess
{
    public string dbinfo;
    string query;

    public DBMSSQL(...)
    {
        dbinfo = ...;

    }

    public void setQuery(...)
    {
        query = myquery;
    }
}

At this point you will be able to do this:

IDBAccess dbConn;
dbConn = new DBMySQL();
dbConn = new DBMSSQL();

Having in mind that you are new to this it may not be useful to suggest that you take a look at NHibernate or Castle ActiveRecord and Castle Windsor. But have them in mind for future.

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Thank you! This is exactly what I needed. I am going to look more into these interface things, pretty neat idea. –  user1020184 Oct 29 '11 at 22:23
    
Yes, you should look into object oriented programming concepts. If I may suggest take a look at msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms173156.aspx and msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms173152.aspx –  Nikola Radosavljević Oct 29 '11 at 22:29

You should not make one big class that handles both databases. You should create a common interface for your wrapper IDBWrapper, and then make a separate implementation for each database.

After this you can create some logic that will choose the right implementation for you. You don't want to write something like this every time you need the wrapper:

IDBWrapper db = (useMySQL ? new MySqlDBWrapper(...) : new MsSqlDBWrapper(...));

There are a couple of options. You could use an abstract factory, but really anything that abstracts the creation of the database wrapper will work.

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I am new to C# and still learning so that kind of thing sounds foreign to me but I will search Google on that shortly, if you are still around and have a few good links let me know. Thanks for the advice. –  user1020184 Oct 29 '11 at 22:12

Is there a specific reason why you want to reimplement a database layer within C#? Have you looked into using say; Entity Framework, NHibernate or any other .NET ORM? Which would wrap all data access up nicely without you having to worry about the implementation details too much. Plus they provide other advantages such as mapping tables to classes for you, (i.e. they populate your classes, based on what's in your tables and the other way around), caching and various other features.

Alternatively, if you do want to create your own, then what you have to do is declare an interface, have all your database connections inherit from this interface and store the connection instances in a property of the interface type. I.e:

public interface IDatabaseConnection
{
    void setQuery(string myQuery);
}

public class DBWrapper
{
    private IDatabaseConnection Connection { get; set; } 

    public DBWrapper(string type)
    {
        if(type == "MySql")
            Connection = new DBMySQL();
        else if(type == "MsSql")
            Connection = new DBMSSQL();
    }
}

public class DBMySQL : IDatabaseConnection
{
    ...
}

public class DBMSSQL : IDatabaseConnection
{
    ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
I've seen the two things you linked to earlier. I would prefer to build everything from scratch so I can learn more about designing my own software, so it's a learning experience really. Your answer is similar to what was just posted a few mins before, I wish I could select both as right answers, but thanks for the help. –  user1020184 Oct 29 '11 at 22:27
    
No worries - Was originally just going to post the interface-based solution but decided to make sure you knew about ORMs, entity framework and NHibernate aswell as it's definitely worth reading into them and using them in the future as they provide a lot of functionality and features and a very good framework to build upon. No harm in building your own as a learning experience though, especially if you later compare yours against 'theirs' (Entity Framework / NHibernate) and use it as a learning experience. –  J.Kommer Oct 29 '11 at 22:44

In ADO.NET, all the connection classes inherit from System.Data.Common.DbConnection, so what you want is actually built in to .NET - all you have to do is store the connection in a DbConnection instead of SqlConnection/MySqlConnection, and use the classes in System.Data.Common instead of the ones in System.Data.Sql/MySql/whatever.

Your main problem here, as I see it, is that there is no real SQL standard - other than simple selects and inserts, you'll need different syntax for SqlServer and MySql queries. To solve this, you need to either use Linq to SQL - which is a lot of work if you don't want to depend on libraries - or, if you only want your wrapper to do specific operations - you can have a dictionary for each database, that stores ready-for-String.Format query templates of those operations, and apply at runtime in the wrapper methods that do those operations.

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You may also take a look at Generic Repository pattern and ORM over those DBs.

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I am looking into that now. Thank you, seems like it will be helpful for the future. –  user1020184 Oct 29 '11 at 22:25

one quick hack that i can think of off the top of my head, is creating one massive class with requisite support for both and based on what the user has selected, use the corresponding objects and classes. Also, you can create several classes one for each of your data sources and then create one landing class which would re-route to the right data source provider class based on what user has selected. Not really pretty, but the one that might work...

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