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I have a class like:

function run(){
this.interval;
this.start = function(){
    this.interval = setInterval('this.draw()',1000);
};
this.draw = function(){
    //some code
};} var run = new run(); run.start();

however I can't seem to reference/call this.draw() within the setInterval, it says this.draw() is not a function, and if I remove the quotes it says useless setInterval call, what am I doing wrong?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The value of this is set depending on how a function is called. When you call a function as a constructor using new then this will refer to the object being created. Similarly when you call a function with dot notation like run.start() then this will refer to run. But by the time the code run by the setInterval is called this doesn't mean what you think. What you can do is save a reference to this and then use that reference, like the following:

function Run(){
  var self = this;

  self.start = function(){
    self.interval = setInterval(function() { self.draw(); },1000);
  };

  self.draw = function(){
    //some code
  };
}

var run = new Run();

run.start();

Note also that you've created a function called run and a variable called run - you need to give them different names. In my code (bearing in mind that JS is case sensitive) I've changed the function name to start with a capital "R" - which is the convention for functions intended to be run as constructors.

EDIT: OK, looking at the other answers I can see that just maybe I overcomplicated it and as long as draw() doesn't need to access this it would've been fine to just say:

this.interval = setInterval(this.draw, 1000);

But my point about not giving your constructor and later variable the same name still stands, and I'll leave all the self stuff in because it is a technique that you will need if draw() does need to access this. You would also need to do it that way if you were to add parameters to the draw() function.

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1  
this.draw won't work if draw needs the right this inside it, when draw is called in the setInterval(this.draw, 1000) version, this will be window inside draw. All the self stuff is necessary if draw uses an instance properties (i.e. if it really is a method rather than just a plain function). –  mu is too short Oct 29 '11 at 22:53
1  
True. When I added my "edit" I was just looking at draw containing "some code" which may not need this, but then it probably won't be a very useful method if it doesn't, so...I'll edit my edit... –  nnnnnn Oct 29 '11 at 22:58
    
Thanks for your answer, removing the quotes and the () worked, then I noticed every time the interval run the variables inside the draw function ponting to this was undefined! then I set everything to self, everything is solved, but, I still don't understand why and how this works, do you mind explaining a bit more please? thanks again. :) oh okay, so this points to window inside the setInterval, HOW WEIRD! anyway is there a better way of doing this, self doesn't look right to me :\ –  fenerlitk Oct 29 '11 at 23:04
    
Well you don't have to call the variable "self", but semantically that's what it is. Some people say "me" or something instead. A lot of people say "that" instead, but I hate "that" because it is wrong semantically ("this" and "that" should not be the same thing). Whatever you name it though the concept is still the best way to do it (that I know of). For more info on how "this" works have a look at what MDN has to say about it (or just google "javascript this" and see what turns up). –  nnnnnn Oct 29 '11 at 23:14
    
nice its working for me –  kathir Aug 28 '14 at 11:13

Instead of using a string as the first argument of setInterval, use a function:

this.interval = setInterval(function(){ this.draw() }, 1000);

Additionally, you can pass the variable directly:

this.interval = setInterval(this.draw, 1000);

If you use the last one, you must remove the () since it will expect whatever this.draw returns to be a function.

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1  
Why not use this.draw directly? –  Dave Newton Oct 29 '11 at 22:45
1  
@Dave: yeah, I've already edited :) –  JCOC611 Oct 29 '11 at 22:46
3  
@Dave: Won't work if draw needs to access the right this (unless of course you've explicitly bound the method to the object). –  mu is too short Oct 29 '11 at 22:49
    
@muistooshort Ah, good point. –  Dave Newton Oct 29 '11 at 22:52
function run(){
    this.interval;
    this.start = function(){
        this.interval = setInterval(this.draw,1000);
    };
    this.draw = function(){
        //some code
    }
;} 

var run = new run();
run.start();
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