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I am using new (==) hashInt which returns a value of type IO (HashTable key val) so is it the case that I can only do lookups/inserts inside of the IO monad?

If this is the case, how can I get pure data from a HashTable for use in a pure function? For ex. I have a function which takes a HashTable and a key as parameters and should return the value that is indexed by that key...

I'm really stumbling around working with Hashtables because I can't get values out of the IO monad. Is this even possible?

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Getting the hashtable out of IO is easy. new (==) hashInt >>= \hashtable -> here you go. Of course, you can't actually do anything without being back to IO. But there's good reasons for that. Hashtables are impure data structures. You don't want IO? Well, don't use impure data structures. There's Data.Map. –  delnan Oct 30 '11 at 0:42
    
The real question is: Is there an ST interface? –  FUZxxl Oct 30 '11 at 13:40
    
Thank you delnan, your comment has helped me understand better :) –  Adi Oct 30 '11 at 14:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

is it the case that I can only do lookups/inserts inside of the IO monad?

Yes

I'm really stumbling around working with Hashtables because I can't get values out of the IO monad. Is this even possible?

No.

Pure values are immutable. This Hashtable is, like most hash tables, a mutable container. This means your program can use the Hashtable only by being careful about the execution order of all the commands. To be helpful when controlling execution order the Haskell language provides the IO (or ST) monads and syntax sugar ("do" notation) for writing your code.

Reading and writing to a Hashtable are both execution commands, and do not use the pure value "let" binding syntax. Thus reading from a HashTable will usually be seen to use "<-" in "do" notation, as in vivian's example.

Note: Using Data.Map.Map will allow you to have something that also allows insert and lookup but is pure.

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Thank you for the really great explanation :) –  Adi Nov 1 '11 at 14:10

The purpose of the IO monad is to deal with side-effects. You need to call your pure functions within the IO monad if you are using data 'inside' IO.

You need to call your pure function within the IO monad.

doSomethingWithHashTable :: HashTable key val -> key -> Maybe val
-- this is the pure function that you sequence within the `IO` monad

main :: IO ()
main = do
    ...
    hashtable <- new (==) hashInt
    hashtable' <- return $ doSomethingWithHashtable hashtable
    ...

EDIT As pointed out in comments all hashtable functions are impure.

doSomethingWithHashTable :: HashTable key val -> IO Bool
doSomethingwithHashtable ht = do
    insert ht 1
    r <- lookup ht 1
    case r of
       Just _   -> return True
       NOhting  -> return False

main = do
    ...
    hashtable <- new (==) hashInt
    result <- doSomethingWithHashTable hashtable
    ...
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1  
Any reason for using the <- return construction instead of a let? –  hugomg Oct 30 '11 at 2:41
    
Also, could you give an example of doSomethingWithHashTable? From the documentation, it seems all operations on Hashtable have IO results. The general idea of your answer (take stuff out of the monad, perform pure operations on it, then put it back in the monad), but since this question is specifically about Hashtable... –  delnan Oct 30 '11 at 2:54
    
Looking at the interface, you're right. Specifically with HashTable all the operations are impure. –  vivian Oct 30 '11 at 3:30
    
@delnan. You are correct, all the HashTable functions are impure. @missingno, no reason, just thought it would demonstrate how pure functions integrate. –  vivian Oct 30 '11 at 3:33

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