Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Is this ValueStore class threadsafe? Does the lock scope in GetInt(string key) need to be extended around the yield return?

public class ValueStore
{
  private readonly object _locker = new object();
  private readonly Dictionary<string, int> _data = 
    new Dictionary<string, int>();

  public ValueStore(Dictionary<string, int> data)
  {
    _data = data;
  }

  public IEnumerable<int> GetInt(string key)
  {
    IEnumerable<KeyValuePair<string, int>> selected;
    lock(_locker)
    {
      selected = _data.Where(x => x.Key.Equals(key));
    }

    foreach (KeyValuePair<string, int> pair in selected)
    {
      yield return pair.Value;
    }
  }
}

The unit test seems to be fine:

[TestFixture]
public class ValueStoreTest
{
  [Test]
  public void test1()
  {
    Dictionary<string, int> data = new Dictionary<string, int>();
    for (int i = 0; i < 100000; i++)
    {
      data.Add(i.ToString(),i);
    }

    ValueStore vs = new ValueStore(data);

    for (int i = 0; i < 900000; i++)
    {
      ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(delegate
      {
        for (int j = 0; j < 100000; j++)
        {
          IEnumerable<int> d = vs.GetInt(j.ToString());
        }
      });
    }
  }
}
share|improve this question
    
You have more serious problems than thread-safety here. You're using the dictionary wrong. You're using it like a list. - You seem to think you can have multiple values assigned to a key. You can't. So yield is unnecessary. - You're enumerating all values in the dictionary instead of just using the contains/get methods. – Craig Gidney Apr 27 '09 at 16:53
up vote 6 down vote accepted

No, it's definitely not thread-safe.

The fact that it uses a dictionary passed in by the client means you have no control over when the client changes it. You're also only locking it when you apply the Where clause - but that doesn't actually perform any iteration at all. You'd need to hold the lock while iterating over the results - but as I said before, it doesn't stop the client from changing the dictionary at any time anyway.

If you created the dictionary in the class and only ever exposed the data within it (i.e. protected it from the outside world) you could make it fully thread-safe. If you insist that the client code doesn't mutate the dictionary, you don't need the lock at all, as dictionaries are safe to read from multiple threads when there are no writers.

share|improve this answer

I can tell you that the statement in the lock isn't executed until after the lock is released. If you must lock the collection during iteration then move the yield into the lock statement.

share|improve this answer
2  
The statement in the lock is executed in the lock. It's just that that statement returns a deferred-execution iterator. The lambda expression isn't executed in the lock, if that's what you meant to say. – Jon Skeet Apr 27 '09 at 16:50

No, it is not. If you begin reading and writing to the Dictionary<string, int> object you passed into the constructor, you have a problem. Your class declaration of _data is instantly overwritten by the assignment in the constructor.

To correct this, copy each key/value pair from the passed in Dictionary in the constructor into your class Dictionary rather than the direct assignment.

Then, I think you're thread-safe, but obviously your class is read-only.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.