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I have a very simple AR application in which I have a marker that I detect, then on this marker, I create an openGL flat surface and apply a texture to it. I'm using a simple square at the moment. The code looks like this:

#define NUM_SURFACE_OBJECT_VERTEX 12
#define NUM_SURFACE_OBJECT_INDEX 12

static const float surfaceVertices[] =
{
     20, -20, 5, 
     20,  20, 5,
    -20,  20, 5, 
    -20, -20, 5
};

static const float surfaceTexCoords[] =
{
    1, 0,
    1, 1,
    0, 1,
    0, 0
};

static const float surfaceNormals[] =
{

};

static const unsigned short surfaceIndices[] =
{
    0, 1, 2,
    2, 3, 0
};

and the code to draw it looks like this:

QCAR::Matrix44F modelViewProjection;

ShaderUtils::translatePoseMatrix(
    0.0f, 0.0f, kObjectScale, &modelViewMatrix.data[0]);

ShaderUtils::scalePoseMatrix(
    kObjectScale,
    kObjectScale,
    kObjectScale,
    &modelViewMatrix.data[0]);

ShaderUtils::multiplyMatrix(
    &projectionMatrix.data[0],
    &modelViewMatrix.data[0],
    &modelViewProjection.data[0]);

glUseProgram(shaderProgramID);

glVertexAttribPointer(
    vertexHandle,
    3,
    GL_FLOAT,
    GL_FALSE,
    0,
    (const GLvoid*)&surfaceVertices[0]);

glVertexAttribPointer(
    textureCoordHandle,
    2,
    GL_FLOAT,
    GL_FALSE,
    0,
    (const GLvoid*)&surfaceTexCoords[0]);

glEnableVertexAttribArray(vertexHandle);
glEnableVertexAttribArray(textureCoordHandle);

glActiveTexture(GL_TEXTURE0);
glBindTexture(GL_TEXTURE_2D, [thisTexture textureID]);
glUniformMatrix4fv(
    mvpMatrixHandle, 1, GL_FALSE, (const GLfloat*)&modelViewProjection.data[0]);

glDrawElements(
    GL_TRIANGLES,
    NUM_SURFACE_OBJECT_INDEX,
    GL_UNSIGNED_SHORT,
    (const GLvoid*)&surfaceIndices[0]);

ShaderUtils::checkGlError("EAGLView renderFrameQCAR");

And here is an array of test textures that I'm rotating through (actually, all the png's are the same, I just copied them over multiple times. They are each 512x512px in size):

 const char* textureFilenames[] = {
        "test.png", "test2.png", "test3.png", "test4.png", "test5.png", 
        "test6.png", "test7.png", "test8.png", "test8.png", "test10.png"} 

My apologies if these arent the correct code segments to show, but this is the draw section of the program. Essentially, this is the sample code that I'm trying to work off of and I've just replaced the teapot model that they use with a flat surface and textures.

So, some points to note:

  1. For some reason, when I use the above code with 1 to about 5 texture only, everything works out fine. I can see the texture normally and can move the camera around to see different perspectives. I have a function that changes the texture every 10 seconds, and when using just a few textures, everything is still normal.
  2. When using more than that, like say rotating between 10 or more different textures, I begin to get strange behavior, like a plane that is jutting outwards from the screen.
    1. If you notice my code above, I commented out anything that uses the normals. I actually don't know what the normals array would look like for a flat surface, so I just tried commenting all the code out.

I've uploaded some pics for reference:

This is a shot of the marker in the background (some wood chips) and the texture applied to the surface. Eveything seems ok.

Marker in background

This is a shot taken at an angle. At this point, I'm only rotating between 5 textures in the code. Everything ok here too.

Shot at an angle

Now, here I'm trying to rotate 10 textures every 10 seconds. Even on the first texture, I get a strange plane that juts out like so:

Fail

Why might this be the case? The sample code isn't giving me any warnings on the loading of the textures and I've tried to even make the textures really small, but still the same behavior. Is there something wrong with how I've declared the vertices and indices? Is it because I've left out normals?

Thank you!

Clarification

These pictures are taken from my iPad 2. My AR application is running on my iPad 2. I am using my macbook air to display the marker of the wood chips. So my ipad is recognizing the marker image being displayed on my macbook air and applying a texture on top of the marker.

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2  
I am a bit confused about the last image. Is this a picture of your computer taken from a camera, or is the lamp an everything part of your textures? Because if it is taken from a camera... well then your computer is somehow leaking polygons into the real world... –  NickLH Oct 30 '11 at 4:27
1  
This picture is a screenshot of what I see in my AR application that is running on my ipad 2. :) –  kurisukun Oct 30 '11 at 4:34

1 Answer 1

It seems to be fixed by adding in the normal vectors!

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