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Let me first state, that this is not a matter of getting my selector name right, nor setting up the button target in loadView, nor any other suggestion I've seen in the last 4 hours of browsing. I should also explain I am not using nibs, nor IB.

These buttons have been working for the bulk of development.
Then poof! It's not just the buttons. My table views do not scroll. Pressing the cells in the table views do not invoke the actions that I had setup.

It seems I've broken the responder chain entirely; or something to that effect.
To try and narrow down the source of the problem a created a window-based project; stripped out everything that xCode generates; deleted the nib; and copied in several methods from my original app delegate and my rootViewController.

It's the RVT that contains the subView that contains the buttons. Fairly straight forward. Same effect. I've literally stripped out all functional code but the following source in appDelegate.m:

-(BOOL)application:(UIApplication *)application didFinishLaunchingWithOptions:(NSDictionary *)launchOptions {
    [[UIApplication sharedApplication] setDelegate:self];
    if(window == nil)
        window = [[UIWindow alloc] init];

    window.autoresizesSubviews = YES;

    if(controller == nil)
        controller = [[Controller alloc] init];

    window.rootViewController = controller;
    [window makeKeyAndVisible];
    return YES;
}

-(void)dealloc {
    [window release];
    [controller release];
    [super dealloc];
}

And in Controller:

- (void)buttonResponse {
    NSLog(@"Button touched up inside!!!!!");
}


- (void)loadView {
    [super loadView];
//test
    button = [UIButton buttonWithType:UIButtonTypeCustom];

    NSString *filePath = [[NSBundle mainBundle] pathForResource:@"Button" ofType:@"png"]; 
    UIImage *image = [UIImage imageWithContentsOfFile:filePath];
    CGSize imageSize = [image size];

    CGRect buttonFrame = CGRectMake(0,0,imageSize.width + 100, BUTTONBAR_H + 100);
    button.frame = buttonFrame;
    [button setImage:image forState:UIControlStateNormal];

    button.backgroundColor = [UIColor blueColor];
    [button setTitle:@"" forState:UIControlStateNormal];

    button.userInteractionEnabled = YES;

    [button addTarget:self action:@selector(buttonResponse) forControlEvents: UIControlEventTouchUpInside];
    UIView *view = self.view;
    CGRect viewFrame = view.frame; //self.view is valid and takes up available screen
    [self.view addSubview:button];
    [self.view bringSubviewToFront:button];
//end test

    [self.view setNeedsDisplay];
}

- (void)dealloc {
    [button release];
    [super dealloc];
}

I know it's gotta be something really simple. But I can't see it. I would prefer to leave my hair in place. I'm wondering if that's going to happen as I continue to learn the quirks.

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1 Answer

Does loadView ever get called? Put a NSLog (or a breakpoint) in loadView just as a sanity check.

Also, from UIViewController Documentation:

If you override this method (loadView) in order to create your views manually, you should do so and assign the root view of your hierarchy to the view property. (The views you create should be unique instances and should not be shared with any other view controller object.) Your custom implementation of this method should not call super.

If you want to perform any additional initialization of your views, do so in the viewDidLoad method. In iOS 3.0 and later, you should also override the viewDidUnload method to release any references to the view or its contents.

Try putting all the button code in viewDidLoad:

- (void)buttonResponse:(id)sender {
    NSLog(@"Button touched up inside!!!!!");
}

- (void)loadView {
    // Dont call super (according to the UIViewController docs)
    // [super loadView];

    // self.view = ... however your setting up self.view 
    // self.view.frame = CGRectMake....
    // self.view.etc...
    [self.view setNeedsDisplay];
}

- (void)viewDidLoad {
    [super viewDidLoad];
    button = [UIButton buttonWithType:UIButtonTypeCustom];
    NSString *filePath = [[NSBundle mainBundle] pathForResource:@"Button" ofType:@"png"]; 
    UIImage *image = [UIImage imageWithContentsOfFile:filePath];
    CGSize imageSize = [image size];
    CGRect buttonFrame = CGRectMake(0,0,imageSize.width + 100, BUTTONBAR_H + 100);
    button.frame = buttonFrame;
    [button setImage:image forState:UIControlStateNormal];
    button.backgroundColor = [UIColor blueColor];
    [button setTitle:@"" forState:UIControlStateNormal];
    button.userInteractionEnabled = YES;
    [button addTarget:self action:@selector(buttonResponse:) forControlEvents:UIControlEventTouchUpInside];

    [self.view addSubview:button];
    [self.view bringSubviewToFront:button];    
}

- (void)dealloc {
    [button release];
    [super dealloc];
}
share|improve this answer
    
hi chown. Thanks for the response. loadView was infact called. I found that defining both loadView and viewDidLoad blew my call stack. I had also tried moving the contents of loadView to viewDidLoad, and omitting loadView. Same apparent effect... –  stephen Oct 30 '11 at 5:16
    
I guess omitting [super loadview] and allocating self.view with a frame is the proper way to define loadview. Still nothing changes... –  stephen Oct 30 '11 at 5:29
    
That is weird. Try putting in NSLog(@"%@", [button allControlEvents]); and NSLog(@"%@", [button allTargets]); and see if the button even has the correct actions. –  chown Oct 30 '11 at 5:50
    
EXC_BAD_ACCESS on first. no touch events on second. –  stephen Oct 30 '11 at 6:19
    
apparently NSLog objects when you pass UIControlEvents as %@. It evaluates to 64, which is UIControlEventTouchUpInside. –  stephen Oct 30 '11 at 6:34
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