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Suppose I have two matrices, each with two columns and differing numbers of row. I want to check and see which pairs of one matrix are in the other matrix. If these were one-dimensional, I would normally just do a %in% x to get my results. match seems only to work on vectors.

> a
      [,1] [,2]
[1,]    1    2
[2,]    4    9
[3,]    1    6
[4,]    7    7
> x
     [,1] [,2]
[1,]    1    6
[2,]    2    7
[3,]    3    8
[4,]    4    9
[5,]    5   10

I would like the result to be c(FALSE,TRUE,TRUE,FALSE).

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I actually asked a very similar question. You can check the answer here: [stackoverflow.com/questions/9316946/… The solution by Matthew Dowle using data.table is extremely elegant. –  user680111 Apr 10 '12 at 18:43

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Another approach would be:

> paste(a[,1], a[,2], sep="$$") %in% paste(x[,1], x[,2], sep="$$")
[1] FALSE  TRUE  TRUE FALSE

A more general version of this is:

> apply(a, 1, paste, collapse="$$") %in% apply(x, 1, paste, collapse="$$")
[1] FALSE  TRUE  TRUE FALSE
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Ok, call me stupid -- what does the "$$" separator do, or did you simply pick a character set guaranteed not to look like an element of a or x ? –  Carl Witthoft Oct 30 '11 at 16:32
    
Thanks Patrick. This is the most intuitive to me, although it does seem a little like cheating :). Carl, yes you are right that there is nothing special about "$$" as long as it is not an element of a or x. But note that nothing is ever "guaranteed" to not be in any matrix that this function operates on. So it's probably a good idea to check that "$$" is not in the matrix. You could do this by making sure both matrices are numeric with is.numeric() or you can check more explicitly with grepl("\\$\\$",a). Actually, I think you only need to check one, right? –  Xu Wang Oct 30 '11 at 17:03
    
Thanks XW. I think I'll use the infamous "_" to join values :-) –  Carl Witthoft Oct 31 '11 at 11:26
2  
Xu Wang: rather than "cheating" I think the word you are looking for is "kludgy". –  Patrick Burns Nov 2 '11 at 8:04

Coming in late to the game: I had previously written an algorithm using the "paste with delimiter" method, and then found this page. I was guessing that one of the code snippets here would be the fastest, but:

andrie<-function(mfoo,nfoo) apply(mfoo, 1, `%inm%`, nfoo)
# using Andrie's %inm% operator exactly as above
carl<-function(mfoo,nfoo) {
allrows<-unlist(sapply(1:nrow(mfoo),function(j) paste(mfoo[j,],collapse='_')) 
 allfoo <- unlist(sapply(1:nrow(nfoo),function(j) paste(nfoo[j,],collapse='_')))
 thewalls<-setdiff(allrows,allfoo)
 dowalls<-mfoo[allrows%in%thewalls,]
}

 ramnath <- function (a,x) apply(a, 1, digest) %in% apply(x, 1, digest)

 mfoo<-matrix( sample(1:100,400,rep=TRUE),nr=100)
 nfoo<-mfoo[sample(1:100,60),]
 microbenchmark(andrie(mfoo,nfoo),carl(mfoo,nfoo),ramnath(mfoo,nfoo),times=5)

Unit: milliseconds
                expr       min        lq    median        uq
  andrie(mfoo, nfoo) 25.564196 26.527632 27.964448 29.687344
    carl(mfoo, nfoo)  1.020310  1.079323  1.096855  1.193926
 ramnath(mfoo, nfoo)  8.176164  8.429318  8.539644  9.258480
        max neval
 102.802004     5
   1.246523     5
   9.458608     5

So apparently constructing character strings and doing a single set operation is fastest! (PS I checked and all 3 algorithms give the same result)

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Andrie's solution is perfectly fine. But if you have big matrices, you might want to try something else, based on recursion. If you work columnwise, you can cut down on the calculation time by excluding everything that doesn't match at the first position:

fastercheck <- function(x,matrix){
  nc <- ncol(matrix)
  rec.check <- function(r,i,id){
    id[id] <- matrix[id,i] %in% r[i]
    if(i<nc & any(id)) rec.check(r,i+1,id) else any(id)
  }
  apply(x,1,rec.check,1,rep(TRUE,nrow(matrix)))
}

The comparison :

> set.seed(100)
> x <- matrix(runif(1e6),ncol=10)
> a <- matrix(runif(300),ncol=10)
> a[c(3,7,9,15),] <- x[c(1000,48213,867,20459),]
> system.time(res1 <- a %inm% x)
   user  system elapsed 
  31.16    0.14   31.50 
> system.time(res2 <- fastercheck(a,x))
   user  system elapsed 
   0.37    0.00    0.38 
> identical(res1, res2)
[1] TRUE
> which(res2)
[1]  3  7  9 15

EDIT:

I checked the accepted answer just for fun. Performs better than the double apply ( as you get rid of the inner loop), but recursion still rules! ;-)

> system.time(apply(a, 1, paste, collapse="$$") %in% 
 + apply(x, 1, paste, collapse="$$"))
   user  system elapsed 
   6.40    0.01    6.41 
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Nice........ –  Andrie Oct 30 '11 at 9:27
    
This is cool, thank you Joris. I really like recursive functions! –  Xu Wang Oct 30 '11 at 17:07

Here is another approach using the digest package and creating checksums for each row, which are generated using a hashing algorithm (the default being md5)

a <- matrix(c(1, 2, 4, 9, 1, 6, 7, 7), ncol=2, byrow=TRUE)
x <- matrix(c(1, 6, 2, 7, 3, 8, 4, 9, 5, 10), ncol=2, byrow=TRUE)
apply(a, 1, digest) %in% apply(x, 1, digest)

[1] FALSE  TRUE  TRUE FALSE
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what a creative and concise solution! Thank you very much, I like this one! –  Xu Wang Oct 31 '11 at 3:29
    
Any thoughts on my speed test? –  Carl Witthoft Jul 16 at 12:42

Recreate your data:

a <- matrix(c(1, 2, 4, 9, 1, 6, 7, 7), ncol=2, byrow=TRUE)
x <- matrix(c(1, 6, 2, 7, 3, 8, 4, 9, 5, 10), ncol=2, byrow=TRUE)

Define a function %inm% that is a matrix analogue to %in%:

`%inm%` <- function(x, matrix){
  test <- apply(matrix, 1, `==`, x)
  any(apply(test, 2, all))
}

Apply this to your data:

apply(a, 1, `%inm%`, x)
[1] FALSE  TRUE  TRUE FALSE

To compare a single row:

a[1, ] %inm% x
[1] FALSE

a[2, ] %inm% x
[1] TRUE
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1  
You can also use identical, eg : %inm% <- function(x,matrix){ apply(x,1,function(i){ any(apply(matrix,1,identical,i)) }) } –  Joris Meys Oct 30 '11 at 9:10
    
thank you Andrie! Thanks also for using a %inm% type operator, which is what I wanted to do. And thank you Joris for the suggestion to use identical. I'm learning a lot from reading all of your solutions, Andrie and Joris! –  Xu Wang Oct 30 '11 at 17:10
    
Andrie, any thoughts on my new speed test? –  Carl Witthoft Jul 16 at 12:43

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