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I'm trying to programmatically add an identity column to a table Employees. Not sure what I'm doing wrong with my syntax.

ALTER TABLE Employees
  ADD COLUMN EmployeeID int NOT NULL IDENTITY (1, 1)

ALTER TABLE Employees ADD CONSTRAINT
	PK_Employees PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED 
	(
	  EmployeeID
	) WITH( STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, 
	ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS = ON) ON [PRIMARY]

What am I doing wrong? I tried to export the script, but SQL Mgmt Studio does a whole Temp Table rename thing.

UPDATE: I think it is choking on the first statement with "Incorrect syntax near the keyword 'COLUMN'."

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1  
What's the error? –  ahsteele Apr 27 '09 at 17:00
    
See update I made. –  BuddyJoe Apr 27 '09 at 17:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 112 down vote accepted

Just remove COLUMN from ADD COLUMN

ALTER TABLE Employees
  ADD EmployeeID numeric NOT NULL IDENTITY (1, 1)

ALTER TABLE Employees ADD CONSTRAINT
        PK_Employees PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED 
        (
          EmployeeID
        ) WITH( STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, 
        ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS = ON) ON [PRIMARY]
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To clarify, the 'COLUMN' keyword is only valid (but not required) in MySQL. –  ethanbustad Feb 12 at 21:28

It could be doing the temp table renaming if you are trying to add a column to the beginning of the table (as this is easier than altering the order). Also, if there is data in the Employees table, it has to do insert select * so it can calculate the EmployeeID.

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1  
"easier that altering the order" - Do you mean that it is possible (although it is more difficult) to alter the order of the columns without recreating the table (through a temp table)? –  Örjan Jämte Sep 16 '09 at 11:41
    
In a relational database, you should never have a need for the ordinality of the columns so if you are trying to neatly order the columns, the question is why? If column ordinality was so important, why isn't there a trivial function to swap or fix ordinality of columns? The reason is it designed for ordinality to not matter. –  Shiv Nov 12 '14 at 3:54

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