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See this piece of code:

import java.util.*;
public class Temp{
    public static void main(String[] args){
        List<int[]> list1 = new ArrayList<int[]>(); //WORKS!
        List<double[]> list2 = new ArrayList<double[]>(); //WORKS!
        //List<double> list3 = new ArrayList<double>(); //DOES NOT WORK
        //List<int> list4 = new ArrayList<int>(); //DOES NOT WORK
    }
}

AFAIK, java generics does not support primitive types, then how is int[] is compiling? How is autoboxing possible here?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

int[] and double[] are object types which extend Object They are not primitives.

You cannot auto box with arrays. Only between primitives and their wrappers.

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1  
Typo: "Only between primitives AND their wrappers." right? –  John Apr 2 '12 at 1:34
1  
Thank you for the correction. –  Peter Lawrey Apr 2 '12 at 7:12

You can to use only reference types (extends from Object) as generic therefore is not compiling with int and double.

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AFAIK, java generics does not support primitive types, then how is int[] is compiling? How is autoboxing possible here?

Firstly, int[] and double[] are not primitive types. They are reference types.

Secondly, there is no autoboxing going on here. Autoboxing is when a primitive value is converted to the corresponding wrapper type value:

  • There is no use of the wrapper type values here.
  • Indeed, there are no values involved at all. (int[] is a type not a value.)
  • There is not even any type-level conversion going on here.

All there is is a compile-time type check that int[] is a subtype of Object.

And an attempted compile-time check that int is a subtype of Object ... that fails, and gives you a compilation error.

If you want a list of integers or doubles, you have to explicitly use the wrapper classes as the type parameter; e.g. List<Integer> or List<Double>.

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they are objects. you can always use Integer or Double. if you want to use int you should use Trove http://trove.starlight-systems.com/

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