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I need to create two threads that strictly alternates. Here is sample code what I use:

#include <Windows.h>
#include <iostream>
using std::cout;
using std::endl;

HANDLE g_hMutex1;
HANDLE g_hMutex2;

DWORD WINAPI ThreadFunc1(LPVOID lpParam);
DWORD WINAPI ThreadFunc2(LPVOID lpParam);

int main(void)
{
    int nCalcNumber = 10;
    DWORD dwThreadId;
    HANDLE pThreadHandles[2];

    g_hMutex1 = CreateMutex(NULL, FALSE, NULL);
    g_hMutex1 = CreateMutex(NULL, FALSE, NULL);

    pThreadHandles[0] = CreateThread(
        NULL,
        0,
        ThreadFunc1,
        static_cast<void*>(&nCalcNumber),
        0,
        &dwThreadId);

    pThreadHandles[1] = CreateThread(
        NULL,
        0,
        ThreadFunc2,
        static_cast<void*>(&nCalcNumber),
        0,
        &dwThreadId);

    WaitForMultipleObjects(2, pThreadHandles, TRUE, INFINITE);

    CloseHandle(pThreadHandles[0]);
    CloseHandle(pThreadHandles[1]);
    CloseHandle(g_hMutex1);
    CloseHandle(g_hMutex2);

    return 0;
}

DWORD WINAPI ThreadFunc1(LPVOID lpParam)
{
    int* nCalcNumber = static_cast<int*>(lpParam);

    for (int i = 0; i < *nCalcNumber; i++)
    {
        WaitForSingleObject(g_hMutex1, INFINITE);

        cout << "Func 1" << endl;

        ReleaseMutex(g_hMutex1);
    }

    return 0;
}

DWORD WINAPI ThreadFunc2(LPVOID lpParam)
{
    int* nCalcNumber = static_cast<int*>(lpParam);

    for (int i = 0; i < *nCalcNumber; i++)
    {
        WaitForSingleObject(g_hMutex1, INFINITE);

        cout << "Func 2" << endl;

        ReleaseMutex(g_hMutex1);
    }

    return 0;
}

And a result, which I expect to receive:

 Func 1
 Func 2
 Func 1
 Func 2
 Func 1
 Func 2
 ...and so one

What should be added to get the desired result. Can I use for that the second mutex?

share|improve this question
3  
What is your current result? And why do you want to do this, as this would defeat the whole purpose of multiple threads. Is this homework? –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Oct 30 '11 at 8:40
4  
I would say that you don't need threads here at all... –  Daniel Mošmondor Oct 30 '11 at 9:15
2  
You declare two mutex handles, 1 and 2, then create two mutexes at 1, so leaking one mutex. Then both threads acquire/release the same mutex 1. –  Martin James Oct 30 '11 at 9:21
1  
I agree with @DanielMošmondor. If you need strict alternance, why don't you use Fibers (if you really need two distinct stacks), or two functions yielding to each other ? –  Alexandre C. Oct 30 '11 at 9:52
1  
@Merlyn Morgan-Graham, this is not homework. This is the next stage of my self learning. I'm usually use C# in my work and now I want to learn a C++. –  Tenere Oct 30 '11 at 9:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you can use semaphore: You can use semaphore instead of mutex, it's easy to use same as mutex.

This code works fine:

#include <windows.h>
#include <iostream>
using std::cout;
using std::endl;

PHANDLE sem1;
PHANDLE sem2;

DWORD WINAPI ThreadFunc1(LPVOID lpParam);
DWORD WINAPI ThreadFunc2(LPVOID lpParam);

int main(void)
{
    int nCalcNumber = 10;
    DWORD dwThreadId;
    HANDLE pThreadHandles[2];

    sem1 = (PHANDLE) CreateSemaphore(NULL, 1, 1, NULL);
    sem2 = (PHANDLE) CreateSemaphore(NULL, 0, 1, NULL);


    pThreadHandles[0] = CreateThread(
                                     NULL,
                                     0,
                                     ThreadFunc1,
                                     static_cast<void*> (&nCalcNumber),
                                     0,
                                     &dwThreadId);

    pThreadHandles[1] = CreateThread(
                                     NULL,
                                     0,
                                     ThreadFunc2,
                                     static_cast<void*> (&nCalcNumber),
                                     0,
                                     &dwThreadId);

    WaitForMultipleObjects(2, pThreadHandles, TRUE, INFINITE);

    CloseHandle(pThreadHandles[0]);
    CloseHandle(pThreadHandles[1]);
    CloseHandle(sem1);
    CloseHandle(sem2);

    return 0;
}

DWORD WINAPI ThreadFunc1(LPVOID lpParam)
{
    int* nCalcNumber = static_cast<int*> (lpParam);

    for (int i = 0; i < *nCalcNumber; i++)
    {
        WaitForSingleObject(sem1, INFINITE);

        cout << "Func 1" << endl;

        ReleaseSemaphore(sem2, 1 ,NULL);
    }

    return 0;
}

DWORD WINAPI ThreadFunc2(LPVOID lpParam)
{
    int* nCalcNumber = static_cast<int*> (lpParam);

    for (int i = 0; i < *nCalcNumber; i++)
    {

        WaitForSingleObject(sem2, INFINITE);

        cout << "Func 2" << endl;

        ReleaseSemaphore(sem1, 1 ,NULL);
    }

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
but but but.... the question was "using mutexes".... –  littleadv Oct 30 '11 at 9:02
    
Thanks, this code really works. I realized the advantage of semaphores. But is it possible to solve this problem, use only mutexes? –  Tenere Oct 30 '11 at 9:25
    
@Tenere: I think it is better solution, maybe there is solution with mutexes. –  deepmax Oct 30 '11 at 10:51
    
There is no need to create a named semaphore here. In fact, it is a bug, because if you run two copies of the program, they will be sharing the same pair of semaphores instead of each having their own private pair. –  Raymond Chen Oct 30 '11 at 13:40
    
@RaymondChen: Yes, but this is a not program to run in real environment, it just a sample to show usage of semaphores for solving the problem. although, he can emit the names by replacing NULL and this issue will be solve. I updated the answer. –  deepmax Oct 30 '11 at 16:26

As noted in other answers, a semaphore is a much better choice than a mutex. But as a purely academic exercise (homework assignment?), you can do this with a mutex, too. (Emphasis: This is a purely academic exercise. A real program shouldn't use this technique.)

DWORD WINAPI ThreadFunc1(LPVOID lpParam)
{
    int* nCalcNumber = static_cast<int*>(lpParam);

    WaitForSingleObject(g_hMutex2, INFINITE);
    for (int i = 0; i < *nCalcNumber; i++)
    {
        WaitForSingleObject(g_hMutex1, INFINITE);
        ReleaseMutex(g_hMutex2);

        cout << "Func 1" << endl;

        ReleaseMutex(g_hMutex1);
        WaitForSingleObject(g_hMutex2, INFINITE);
    }

    return 0;
}

DWORD WINAPI ThreadFunc2(LPVOID lpParam)
{
    int* nCalcNumber = static_cast<int*>(lpParam);

    WaitForSingleObject(g_hMutex2, INFINITE);
    for (int i = 0; i < *nCalcNumber; i++)
    {
        WaitForSingleObject(g_hMutex1, INFINITE);
        ReleaseMutex(g_hMutex2);

        cout << "Func 2" << endl;

        ReleaseMutex(g_hMutex1);
        WaitForSingleObject(g_hMutex2, INFINITE);
    }

    return 0;
}

Mutex 1 is the "I have it" mutex, and Mutex 2 is the "I want it next" mutex.

share|improve this answer

You're assuming that OS actually supports this. Windows doesn't. It has no guarantee about the scheduling, other then no starvation.

So what you need to do is to set a flag variable, so that each thread will change it to allow the other thread to run. For example, if it's true - run, if it's false - release the mutex and sleep for awhile, and the other thread - exactly the opposite. Sleep is important here to avoid starvation and deadlock. I think it can be Sleep(0) (check if it means "yield" in Windows, I'm not sure).

Of course, the checks should be done when the mutex is taken, and at the end of the run each thread will change the variable to the opposite - to allow the other thread to run and block itself until the other thread does run and changes it back.

It can be easily changed to more than 2 threads by making the variable a counter modulo the number of threads, and each thread increasing the value at the end of the run, and checking the value modulo to be the thread's number in order of the execution at the beginning.

edit

volatile bool flag = false;

DWORD WINAPI ThreadFunc1(LPVOID lpParam)
{
    int* nCalcNumber = static_cast<int*>(lpParam);

    for (int i = 0; i < *nCalcNumber; /*no-op*/;)
    {
        WaitForSingleObject(g_hMutex1, INFINITE);

        if (flag) {Sleep(0); continue;}

        cout << "Func 1" << endl;

        flag = true;
        i++;
        ReleaseMutex(g_hMutex1);
    }

    return 0;
}

DWORD WINAPI ThreadFunc2(LPVOID lpParam)
{
    int* nCalcNumber = static_cast<int*>(lpParam);

    for (int i = 0; i < *nCalcNumber; /*no-op*/;)
    {
        WaitForSingleObject(g_hMutex1, INFINITE);
        if (!flag) {Sleep(0); continue;}

        cout << "Func 2" << endl;

        flag = false;
        i++;
        ReleaseMutex(g_hMutex1);
    }

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, for your answer. I imagine your decision as follows: WaitForSingleObject, while loop where I check the global variable, cout to stream, change global variable, ReleaseMutex. So I can use only one mutex. Is there is a solution without a while loop? –  Tenere Oct 30 '11 at 9:29
    
@tenere, the while loop has nothing to do with mutexes, it's how you manage the threads. In your code you have a for loop which is exactly the same, so you don't need any additional loop, just increase the for loop counter when the thread actually runs, and Sleep otherwise. –  littleadv Oct 30 '11 at 9:46
    
@tenere - edited to show what I mean. –  littleadv Oct 30 '11 at 9:48
    
thanks for code. Now I really understand what you mean. –  Tenere Oct 30 '11 at 9:55
    
@Tenere - you were nearly there with your original code. Two mutexes would have worked, but you created both mutexes on the same handle. If you create 1 and 2, thread A could release mutex 2 and wait on mutex 1. Thread B could release mutex 1 and wait on mutex 2. Effectively, you are then swapping a token between the two threads. Polling yield/sleep solutions are nearly always bad solutions. –  Martin James Oct 30 '11 at 10:30

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