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I am having some trouble finding some suitable examples to solve my problem. I want to share 4K (4096) byte of data between user and kernel space. I found many ideas which says I have to allocate memory from kernel and mmap it in user-space. Can someone provide an example on how to do it in Linux 2.6.38. Is there any good document which explains it?

Thanks in advance.

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There's one implementation here: people.ee.ethz.ch/~arkeller/linux/… –  Mat Oct 30 '11 at 8:55
    
I saw this one. This uses debugfs. How to avoid this debugfs? –  max Oct 30 '11 at 8:58

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your proposed way is one way, but as userspace is not within your control (meaning any userspace program have a possibility of poking into the kernel), you are opening up the opportunities for malicious attack from userspace. This kernel-based memory-sharing-with-userspace is also described here:

http://www.scs.ch/~frey/linux/memorymap.html

Instead, how about allocating memory in userspace, and then from kernel use the API copy_from_user() and copy_to_user() to copy to/from userspace memory? If u want to share the memory among the different processes, then u can always use IPC related API to allocate and define the memory, eg shmget() etc. And in this case there are lots of sample codes within the kernel source itself.

eg.

fs/checksum.c: missing = __copy_from_user(dst, src, len);

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This link worked for me to get memory mapping. I first tried allocating memory from user space and passing the pointer to kernel space and use it via copy_from_user. But problem is, I need to access from a kernel thread and kernel threads don't run under my process context all the time so copy_from_user does not copy from my desired memory. –  max Oct 31 '11 at 17:15
    
i see, so it means u are not sharing memory between single userprocess, but sharing memory between MANY user-processes, and kernel, right? if so then yes, it is better to allocate once in kernel, and then mmap it userspace. this means that u are creating lots of pagetable entries (for each process's userspace component, although all of them shared the same kernel component) pointing in the same kernel memory area. performance is going to be very bad, as each updates will be replicated to all process synchronously, via normal pagefault mechanism. –  Peter Teoh Jan 30 '12 at 15:06
    
There is only one process instance. There is multiple threads from that process. There are also multiple kernel threads created from system call. these kernel threads and user level threads share memory. Kernel level thread puts something. User thread picks it up. And something like that. –  max Jan 30 '12 at 21:06
    
i see, since one process, multiple thread, then any memory allocated in the process via malloc() is always accessible from ANY threads. and since these are the user threads that made the system call, which in turns get transition into the kernel context, u can always use copy_to/from_user inside the kernel to access the user thread allocated memory. ie, there is no kernel thread used here. i am not sure why u need kernel thread? it is normally used for per-hardware asynchronous interaction (eg, per-CPU, per-disk etc), and even so its use is discourage and going away: –  Peter Teoh Jan 31 '12 at 2:36
    
i see, since one process, multiple user thread, then any memory allocated in the process via malloc() is always accessible from ANY threads. and since these are the user threads that made the system call, which in turns get transition into the kernel context, u can always use copy_to/from_user inside the kernel to access the user thread allocated memory. ie, there is no kernel thread used here. not sure why u need kernel thread? normally used for per-hardware interaction (eg, per-CPU, per-disk etc), and even so its use is discourage and going away: lwn.net/Articles/403891 –  Peter Teoh Jan 31 '12 at 2:36

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