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I'm using XSLT 1.0 and I'm tring to make the following:

I've got the 1.xml file:

<root>
    <elem1>value1</elem1>
    <elem2>
        <elem3>
            <param1>value2</param1>
            <param2>value3</param2>
        </elem3>
    </elem2>
    <elem4>
        <param3>value4</param3>
    </elem4>
</root>

Now a client passes me another xml file that tells me what elements he wants me to give him back (could change between clients), i.e.:

<root>
  <RequiredElements>
    <elementName>elem1</elementName>
    <elementName>elem2/elem3/param1</elementName>
  </RequiredElements>
</root>

Which means that in this case, I should make another xml file, with this structure:

<root>
  <elem1>value1</elem1>
  <elem2>
    <elem3>
      <param1>value2</param1>
    </elem3>
  </elem2>
</root>

I've tried to come up with something in xslt (no programing languages other than that) to get the structure that I need, but couldn't make it.

Any ideas or pointers of what should I do?

Thanks for the help.

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2 Answers 2

This simple transformation (less than 30 lines if the parameter-doc isn't inlined):

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform"
 xmlns:my="my:my">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>
 <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

 <my:paramDoc>
        <root>
          <RequiredElements>
            <elementName>elem1</elementName>
            <elementName>elem2/elem3/param1</elementName>
          </RequiredElements>
        </root>
 </my:paramDoc>

 <xsl:variable name="vPaths" select=
   "document('')/*/my:paramDoc/*/*/*"/>

 <xsl:template match="node()|@*" name="identity">
         <xsl:copy>
           <xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*"/>
         </xsl:copy>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="*/*">
  <xsl:variable name="vPath">
    <xsl:for-each select=
      "ancestor-or-self::*[not(position()=last())]">
      <xsl:value-of select="concat(name(), '/')"/>
    </xsl:for-each>
  </xsl:variable>

   <xsl:if test=
   "$vPaths[starts-with(concat(.,'/'), $vPath)]">
    <xsl:call-template name="identity"/>
   </xsl:if>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

when applied on the provided XML document:

<root>
    <elem1>value1</elem1>
    <elem2>
        <elem3>
            <param1>value2</param1>
            <param2>value3</param2>
        </elem3>
    </elem2>
    <elem4>
        <param3>value4</param3>
    </elem4>
</root>

produces the wanted, correct result:

<root>
   <elem1>value1</elem1>
   <elem2>
      <elem3>
         <param1>value2</param1>
      </elem3>
   </elem2>
</root>

Explanation:

  1. The identity rule copies every node "as-is".

  2. There is a single overriding template that matches any element whose parent is element In this template the following is done:

  3. A string that is a relative XPath expression with context node the top element of the document -- is produced for the current (matched) node.

  4. If this relative path is a prefix of one of the expressions specified in the document passed as parameter, then we perform the identity transform on this element.

share|improve this answer
    
Beautiful! I didn't even know you could construct variables using elements embedded in xsl:variable. XSLT can be so elegant in the right hands. –  G_H Oct 31 '11 at 10:09
    
@G_H: Yes, XSLT can be extremely powerful and elegant. Just have a look at FXSL (2.0 for XSLT 2.0). –  Dimitre Novatchev Oct 31 '11 at 12:11

This is the best I've been able to come up with so far:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">

    <xsl:output method="xml" encoding="UTF-8" indent="yes" version="1.0"/>

    <xsl:template match="/root">
        <xsl:copy>
            <xsl:for-each select="*">
                <xsl:call-template name="check-if-allowed">
                    <xsl:with-param name="path" select="local-name(.)"/>
                </xsl:call-template>
            </xsl:for-each>
        </xsl:copy>
    </xsl:template>

    <xsl:template name="check-if-allowed">

        <xsl:param name="path"/>

        <xsl:copy>

            <xsl:if test="$path = document('filter.xml')//RequiredElements/elementName/text()">
                <xsl:attribute name="flagged-by-filter">true</xsl:attribute>
            </xsl:if>

            <xsl:choose>
                <xsl:when test="*">
                    <xsl:for-each select="*">
                        <xsl:call-template name="check-if-allowed">
                            <xsl:with-param name="path" select="concat($path, '/', local-name(.))"/>
                        </xsl:call-template>
                    </xsl:for-each>
                </xsl:when>
                <xsl:otherwise>
                    <xsl:copy-of select="text()"/>
                </xsl:otherwise>
            </xsl:choose>

        </xsl:copy>

    </xsl:template>

</xsl:stylesheet>

Let's go over that: the first template matches your /root element. It's gonna make a shallow copy and then calls template check-if-allowed for each child element, passing in that child element's local name as a parameter path.

The check-if-allowed template accepts a parameter with name path. It makes a shallow copy of its node, then tests if the path parameter is contained in the selection made from document filter.xml. This'd have to be a path to your second document, which contains the list of paths that are allowed. If the test is successful (i.e. if the path param appears as a elementName's text content in filter.xml) then it's also gonna add an attribute with name flagged-by-filter and value true.

After that, the xsl:choose is gonna do one of two things. If there are any child elements for the current one, it's going to call the same check-if-allowed template on them, but each time with a path parameter that the local name of that element was added to. If there are no child elements, it's simply gonna copy whatever text might have been in the current element.

Mind that this is a very incomplete solution. It ignores attributes and won't work for mixed content (that is, text mixed with elements).

This second stylesheet can be applied to the result of the first one to do the actual filtering:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">

    <xsl:output method="xml" version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" indent="yes"/>

    <xsl:template match="/">
        <xsl:copy><xsl:apply-templates select="*"/></xsl:copy>
    </xsl:template>

    <xsl:template match="*[//*[@flagged-by-filter='true']]">
        <xsl:copy><xsl:apply-templates select="*"/></xsl:copy>
    </xsl:template>

    <xsl:template match="*[* and not(//*[@flagged-by-filter='true']) and @flagged-by-filter='true']">
        <xsl:copy></xsl:copy>
    </xsl:template>

    <xsl:template match="*[not(*) and @flagged-by-filter='true']">
        <xsl:copy-of select="."/>
    </xsl:template>

    <xsl:template match="*[not(*) and not(@flagged-by-filter='true')]"/>

</xsl:stylesheet>

Again, very basic work here. It doesn't handle attributes, and there's still an issue since elem4 always passes for some reason. Not sure why, debugger shows me it always matches the second template but I can't imagine how.

This is the more usual declarative XSLT style. First template matches the root. It simply copies it, then applies templates to its child elements. Second template matches any element that has a descendent with an flagged-by-filter="true" attribute. Third template matches any element that has at least one child element, has the flagged-by-filter attribute but no descendants with said attribute. Fourth template matches any element that doesn't have a child element but is itself flagged. Final template matches any element thta doesn't have a child element nor is flagged itself.

While this isn't a full solution to your problem, I hope it's enough to get you on your way. If you're not at liberty to apply two consecutive XSLT transforms, you'll need to find a way to apply stuff from the first XSLT as you require. I can't think of how this could be done, but perhaps someone else has a good idea.

That said and done, for a problem like this either wouldn't use XSLT or would simply generate the stylesheet programmatically based in your filter XML. The above is gonna be very bad in terms of performance, since we're constantly applying XPath expressions on an additional document. Not only that, it'll have to be fully parsed every time. I've once had a similar setup and found performance to be very poor. So I changed the access to the second document into an extension function that would call a Java method using pre-loaded data.

XSLT is great for some stuff, but when you get into complexity like this I think it's best in combination with another language.

share|improve this answer
    
@_G_H: It seems that at the end of your answer you are implying that every call to the document() function causes (re-) parsing of the XML document. This isn't true and in fact if a given XSLT processor is re-parsing, it is non-compliant -- because as the W3C XSLT specification(s) define it, the document() function must be stable -- that is, produce exactly the same node every time it is called with the same arguments. –  Dimitre Novatchev Oct 30 '11 at 21:04
    
@DimitreNovatchev Interesting... I have observed dimished performance using document(), though. Although that is probably to be expected when you're dragging a second document into the process over which XPath expressions are evaluated. It is so that the second document was basically key-value pairs, meaning a search on attribute values instead of element names. Not a very good approach. I changed it to reading the property doc into a Properties object and simply accessing that via an extension function. Performance improved quite a bit. –  G_H Oct 31 '11 at 10:04
    
@_G_H: If the key-value pairs document isn't small, serching through it must cause performance bottleneck. The right solution here is to use <xsl:key> and the key() function -- this will cause significant performance improvement if multiple searches are performed. –  Dimitre Novatchev Oct 31 '11 at 12:19
    
@DimitreNovatchev That would've probably worked as well. Still, it doesn't matter a great deal. It's used for the presentation of EDI-XML messages in a user portal but I'll soon rework it. Newer version makes use of a much more understandable XML format. –  G_H Oct 31 '11 at 12:23

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