Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

The following ways of writing a javascript function are equivalent.

Maybe the first one is more clear.

Nevertheless, many programmers prefer the second way.

There are significant difference between the two ways for preferring the second-one?

First way:

Class.prototype.fn = function () {
        var obj = { 
            … 
        };

        return obj;
};

Second way:

Class.prototype.fn = function () {

        return {
            .........
          };
};
share|improve this question
1  
Personally I dislike having variables that are only used once. Why do you think the first way is more clear? When you see return { you know you're returning an object. – nnnnnn Oct 30 '11 at 11:23
    
@nnnnnn: Well, there's always the desire to inspect the resulting object before returning it when single-stepping the code in a debugger. – T.J. Crowder Oct 30 '11 at 11:28
    
@T.J. - True, and I nearly mentioned that, having needed to do it just the other day, but still I find if I get stuck debugging something it's not that big a deal to temporarily put a single-use variable in for that situation (especially in JS where a minor change generally doesn't require rebuilding the project). The same day I found myself debugging somebody else's code including some pretty long functions where I kept having to double-check where some variables were used only to find they were used only once within a line or two of declaration and assignment. – nnnnnn Oct 30 '11 at 11:42
up vote 7 down vote accepted

Unless you need to perform an operation on obj after creating it via the literal, there's no difference and it's just a subjective style preference. (Note that said use could be in the code, or during debugging; more below.)

So for example, there's a real practical difference here:

Class.prototype.fn = function () {
        var obj = { 
            subordinate: {
                foo: function() {
                    if (obj.flag) {
                        doOneThing();
                    }
                    else {
                        doSomethingElse();
                    }
                }
            }
        };

        return obj;
};

There, you need the name, so that obj.subordinate.foo() works. (Not that I'd advocate doing this, but it's an example of when there's an objective rather than subjective distinction.) But barring needing to use it after initialization and before return, it's just a subjective thing.

Of course, that use need not necessarily be in the code. The form with the obj variable can be more useful when debugging, if you need to inspect what you're returning before you return it.


Perhaps going a bit off-piste here, but I think it's related: In contrast to the examples in your question, there's a real, practical, tangible difference between this:

Class.prototype.foo = function () {
        … 
};
Class.prototype.bar = function () {
        … 
};

and this:

(function() {
    function Class_foo() {
            … 
    }
    function Class_bar() {
            … 
    }

    Class.prototype.foo = Class_foo;
    Class.prototype.bar = Class_bar;
})();

...that difference being that in the former, the functions have no names (the properties referring to them do, but not the functions themselves). In the latter case, the functions have real names, which help your tools help you by showing you names in call stacks, lists of breakpoints, etc.

share|improve this answer
    
You can assign and name functions inline though: Class.prototype = { bar: function Class$bar(){ }, foo: function Class$foo(){ } }; – Esailija Oct 30 '11 at 11:33
1  
@Esailija: You should be able to, but you can't on IE8 or earlier (and other JavaScript engines have at various times gotten aspects of that wrong as well). If you try that -- it's called a named function expression -- on IE8 or earlier, it actually creates two completely distinct function objects and it leaks the function names into the containing scope (which it shouldn't). See the linked article for more. – T.J. Crowder Oct 30 '11 at 11:41
    
I was aware that on older IE browsers two functions are created, but since we are in a closure (per your example) and it only leaks to scope (not to global), it shouldn't be a problem. – Esailija Oct 30 '11 at 11:51
    
@Esailija: Even then, there are serious problems (and of course a lot of people won't realize they need to do that). Within the function, the function's name will refer to a different function on IE than it will on other browsers. Consider: jsbin.com/ijideh It's a code trap waiting to catch you and waste your time. It gets even worse if you try to clean up those dangling functions as advocated by some: jsbin.com/ijideh/2 Until older IE versions are finally gone, you're much better off avoiding named function expressions in browser code. – T.J. Crowder Oct 30 '11 at 12:18
    
The jsbin examples you provided are intentionally constructed to fail (using function name instead of arguments.callee, naming the function the same as the variable/property it is assigned to ). The only real downside is insignificant memory usage increase in < IE8 browsers (3k per 10000 function objects?). And even that can be worked around with extra work if absolutely necessary. You can read more from here – Esailija Oct 30 '11 at 12:39

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.