Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am new to these awk and shell things and got stuck with a simple but logical issue ..

Input File:

6000 9876 5675 ....
8576 8765 9845 ...
....

Output File: (required)

60 00 98 76 56 75 ....
85 76 87 65 98 45 ...
....

Converting output to input is a rather easy task

awk '{printf("%s%s %s%s %s%s %s%s", $1, $2, $3, $4, $5, $6, $7, $8)}' output_file
                                                          > input_file

But converting input to output I am getting no guess

(also no. of fields are not known in advance although I think some logic with NF can solve this issue) but main problem is even if I know no. of fileds then how to proceed for that??

The min. unit to be read wll be like $1,$2 etc.. and I need to break them and need to insert a space between them.

I don't know much about regex but trying my hand on it.May be some manipulation with sed and regex could help me out.

Please provide your valuable suggestons.`

share|improve this question
    
Sorry for that wrong spelling of formatting in title .Thanx for the edit ... –  Udit Gupta Oct 30 '11 at 13:05

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted
tr -d ' ' < inputFile | sed 's/../& /g'

Alternatively to avoid the first tr:

sed -e 's/ //g' -e 's/../& /g'
share|improve this answer
    
Can you explain what that & is doing exactly.As i have mentioned I am new to these things so asking just because of curiosity. –  Udit Gupta Oct 30 '11 at 13:07
    
& means here the two characters to be substituted, i.e. the sed command tell to replace every sequence of two characters by themselves followed by a space character. The first tr command removes any space from the initial file to simplify the sed processing. –  jlliagre Oct 30 '11 at 13:18
    
thanx I got it .... –  Udit Gupta Oct 30 '11 at 13:20
    
Would this leave a space before the newline? –  potong Oct 30 '11 at 13:36
    
As is, it will indeed but this issue would be easy to workaround: ... -e 's/ $//' –  jlliagre Oct 30 '11 at 14:10

Here's a sed example:

$ echo "1234 5678 9012"|sed -e 's/\([0-9][0-9]\)\([0-9][0-9]\)/\1 \2/g'
12 34 56 78 90 12
share|improve this answer
    
As you already know the input consists only of numbers and spaces perhaps <<<"1234 5678 9012" sed -r 's/(..)(..)(\s)?/\1 \2\3/g' might be suffice. –  potong Oct 30 '11 at 13:34

since the question title mentioned "awk", I gave an awk solution though there is already accepted answer:

this needs gawk:

kent$  echo "6000 9876 5675
8576 8765 9845"|awk '{for(i=1;i<=NF;i++)$i=gensub(/^([0-9]{2})([0-9]{2})$/,"\\1 \\2","g",$i);print }'                                    
60 00 98 76 56 75
85 76 87 65 98 45
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.