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I have spent about 2 Days trying to find out how to make 3d objects using lwjgl, and have found nothing. I can easily render 2d objects, and when I tried to render 3d objects, either the program crashed, or a black screen was opened, right now, I'm using Eclipse, and I'm running it in that environment (I don't know if that's the problem). If someone could point me towards a good tutorial, or just give me an explanation of what I'm doing wrong, that would be appreciated. Here's my code:

    import org.lwjgl.LWJGLException;
    import org.lwjgl.opengl.Display;
    import org.lwjgl.opengl.DisplayMode;
    import org.lwjgl.opengl.GL11;

    public class Objects {
        public static void main(String[] args) {
            Objects objects = new Objects();
            objects.start();
        }

        public void start() {
            try {
                Display.setDisplayMode(new DisplayMode(800, 600));
                Display.create();
            } catch (LWJGLException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
                System.exit(0);
            }

            initGL();

            while(!Display.isCloseRequested) {
                Cube();

                Display.update();
            }

            Display.destroy();
        }

        public void initGL() {
            GL11.glMatrixMode(GL11.GL_PROJECTION);
            GL11.glLoadIdentity();
            GL11.glOrtho(0, 800, 600, 0, 1, -1);
            GL11.glMatrixMode(GL11.GL_MODELVIEW);

            return;
        }

        public void cube() {
            GL11.glClear(GL11.GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT | GL11.GL_DEPTH_BUFFER_BIT);

            //front face

            GL11.glColor3d(0.0, 1.0, 1.0);
            GL11.glVertex3d(1.0, 1.0, -1.0);
            GL11.glVertex3d(-1.0, 1.0, -1.0);
            GL11.glVertex3d(-1.0, -1.0, -1.0);
            GL11.glVertex3d(1.0, -1.0, -1.0);

            //side face

            GL11.glColor3d(1.0, 0.0, 0.0);
            GL11.glVertex3d(1.0, 1.0, -1.0);
            GL11.glVertex3d(1.0, 1.0, -3.0);
            GL11.glVertex3d(1.0, -1.0, -3.0);
            GL11.glVertex3d(1.0, -1.0, -1.0);

            ...(I kept going like this for the rest of the faces)

             return;
         }

******EDIT******

I have read both of your answers, and have made a java lwjgl code based on it, however when I tried to run it in the Eclipse environment, it gave me the error:

usage:
XPMFile <file>
java.lang.ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException: 0
at org.lwjgl.util.XPMFile.main(XPMFile.java:260)

So, once again here's my code:

    package testing;

    import org.lwjgl.LWJGLException;
    import org.lwjgl.opengl.Display;
    import org.lwjgl.opengl.DisplayMode;
    import org.lwjgl.opengl.GL11;
    import org.lwjgl.util.glu.GLU;

    public class CubeRender {
        public static void main(String[] args) {
            CubeRender cube = new CubeRender();
            cube.start();
        }

        public void start() {
            try {
                Display.setDisplayMode(new DisplayMode(800, 600));
                Display.create();
            } catch(LWJGLException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
                System.exit(0);
            }

            initGL();

            while(!Display.isCloseRequested()) {
                renderCube();

                Display.update();
            }

            Display.destroy();
        }

        public void initGL() {
            GL11.glMatrixMode(GL11.GL_PROJECTION);

            GL11.glLoadIdentity();

            GLU.gluPerspective(45, 100, 1, 100);
            GL11.glEnable(GL11.GL_DEPTH_TEST);
            GL11.glDepthFunc(GL11.GL_LEQUAL);

            GL11.glMatrixMode(GL11.GL_MODELVIEW);
        }

        public void renderCube() {
            double x = 1;
            double y = 1;
            double z = -1;

            //front face

            GL11.glBegin(GL11.GL_QUADS);

            GL11.glNormal3d(0, 0, 1);

            GL11.glColor3d(0.0, 1.0, 1.0);
            GL11.glVertex3d(x, y, z);
            GL11.glVertex3d(x-2, y, z);
            GL11.glVertex3d(x-2, y-2, z);
            GL11.glVertex3d(x, y-2, z);

            GL11.glEnd();

            //right face

            GL11.glBegin(GL11.GL_QUADS);

            GL11.glNormal3d(-1, 0, 0);

            GL11.glVertex3d(x, y, z);
            GL11.glVertex3d(x, y, z-2);
            GL11.glVertex3d(x, y-2, z-2);
            GL11.glVertex3d(x, y-2, z);

            GL11.glEnd();

            return;
        }
    }

**EDIT 2** if you have anything to contribute for the above answer please post answers here: XPMFile information needed for lwjgl

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your using a 2d orthographic view see the following line "GL11.glOrtho(0, 800, 600, 0, 1, -1);" which clips everything to 1, -1 axis for the 3rd dimension.

What you really need to be looking at is a setting up a 3d view, likely using glFrustum or gluPerspective instead of glOrtho.

Although old now, you should have a quick read of the Nehe Tutorials at http://nehe.gamedev.net/ with some LWJGL ports of the first few found at http://ninjacave.com/nehetutorials

Do keep in mind that the Nehe tutorials use classic OpenGL is which pretty much depreciated for modern opengl, however it doesn't hurt to know how classic opengl works. Its better you google for some newer OpenGL tutorials that use techniques such as shaders and VBO's, I'd recommend that you get some books like the OpenGL Red Book, Orange Book or OpenGL Super Bible. Alternatively have a look at the links and resources page on the LWJGL Wiki, it should point you to a ton of opengl resources and tutorials.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the response, I'll try that. –  JAW1025 Oct 30 '11 at 16:35
    
Okay, I looked at the gluPerspective on the lwjgl website, and i know it wants four float values, but how do you use it?, and what do the float values mean??? –  JAW1025 Oct 30 '11 at 17:01
    
don't think i'll be able to explain it better than this link profs.sci.univr.it/~colombar/html_openGL_tutorial/en/… Anything before the nearClip point and after the farClip point is clipped (i.e. not drawn), aspect is usually the ratio of the screen (i.e. width/height), and fov is the angle of the field of view. –  Gavin Oct 30 '11 at 17:37
    
Thanks for the answer, I looked at the website and it helped a lot. I take it you would import org.lwjgl.util.gluPerspective –  JAW1025 Oct 30 '11 at 17:54
    
gluPerspective is part of GLU library, LWJGL includes GLU in the lwjgl_util.jar, so the import will be "import org.lwjgl.util.glu.GLU;" then "GLU.gluPerspective()" in your code (with parameters) lwjgl.org/javadoc/org/lwjgl/util/glu/GLU.html –  Gavin Oct 30 '11 at 20:18

I'm not sure if you included it, but if you didn't I'll point it out.

You appear to be trying to draw the cube, without actually starting to draw.

GL11.glBegin(int mode)

Starts drawing the shapes. GL11.GL_QUADS is used when drawing faces with 4 vertices, every 4 vertices added will automatically be used as the next face, then you define 4 more vertices.

GL11.GL_TRIANGLES is used when creating trigons, or faces with 3 vertices. For your case you want to use:

GL11.glBegin(GL11.GL_QUADS);

Place that at the beginning of rendering your entire world, you can switch between triangles and quads at any point, granted the previous face is complete.

After you are done with all the drawing all the shapes, then put this line at the end of your rendering.

GL11.glEnd();

And that will end the drawing process.

If you plan on using lighting it is extremely important to get into the habit of setting normals before placing vertices, a normal is a set of 3 numbers that tell which direction a face if pointing. By default it's facing towards the +z axis, meaning if you had a floor and a light above the floor the light would seem to only go in one direction. To set a normal use:

GL11.glNormal3d(x, y, z);

examples:

 0,  1,  0 is straight up
 0, -1,  0 is straight down.
 1,  0,  0 is facing towards +X
-1,  0,  0 is facing towards -X
 0,  0,  1 is facing towards +Z
 0,  0, -1 is facing towards -Z

You set the normal before the vertices, you do not need to set the normal for each vertice, only before the group of them, seeing all vertice on that face will be facing the same direction.

Even without light, it is usually a good idea to work with normals, they can also affect how well your physics work.

Also, without depth testing some 3D objects that should be behind other ones might show up in the front. LWJGL has a function specifically for using depth.

GL11.glEnable(GL11.GL_DEPTH_TEST);
GL11.glDepthFunc(GL11.GL_LEQUAL);

Place that in your initGL(), before setting the Matrix Mode and such.

LEQUAL stands for length equal, it compares the distances to see which is higher and those objects are behind those that have shorter distance.

pointers to some good LWJGL resources:

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the extra help, I did put the GL11.glBegin in my code, but didn't post it, what would you do if you were drawing a face with more than four vertices? And I didn't know about the normals, or the depth stuff, and the links you provided were very helpful. –  JAW1025 Oct 30 '11 at 20:07
    
most engines don't allow polygons with more than 4 vertices, so most of them split one face into a few, like example, to make a 5 sided face make a square and a triangle off of two of the square's vertices. For LWJGL it is possible, but ineffective to use GL_POLYGON. –  D3_JMultiply Oct 30 '11 at 23:54

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