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Having class Int (code below) and operator+(below) I can successfully compile it with gcc 4.6.1 if I have:

template<class Int_T>
    class Int
    {
    };

template<class A,class B>
A operator+(const Int<A>& left, const Int<B>& right)

{
    return -1;///this is dummy
}



int main()
{
    Int<int> a(5);
    Int<int> b(6);//BUT IF I CHANGE TO OTHER TYPE THAN int I'M GETTING ERROR
    auto c = a + b;
    return 0;
}

The error I'm getting:
...\main.cpp|10|error: no match for 'operator+' in 'a + b'
Could anyone tell me what am I doing wrong?
EDIT (real example)

#ifndef IF__H_INCLUDED
#define IF__H_INCLUDED

template<bool Cond, class First, class Second>
struct if_
{
    typedef typename First::type type;
};

template<class First, class Second>
struct if_<false,First,Second>
{
    typedef typename Second::type type;
};

#endif // IF__H_INCLUDED
#ifndef CHOOSE_LARGER_H_INCLUDED
#define CHOOSE_LARGER_H_INCLUDED
#include <type_traits>
template<class A,class B>
struct Choose_Larger
{
    typedef typename std::conditional<(sizeof(A) > sizeof(B)),A,B>::type type;
};
#ifndef IS_CHAR_H_INCLUDED
#define IS_CHAR_H_INCLUDED
#include <type_traits>

template<class Int_T>
struct Is_Char_
{
    enum {value = false};
};

template<>
struct Is_Char_<char>
{
    enum {value = true};
};

template<>
struct Is_Char_<unsigned char>
{
    enum {value = true};
};

template<>
struct Is_Char_<signed char>
{
    enum {value = true};
};

template<class Int_T>
struct Is_Char : Is_Char_<typename std::remove_cv<Int_T>::type>
{

};

#endif // IS_CHAR_H_INCLUDED

#endif // CHOOSE_LARGER_H_INCLUDED
#ifndef PROMOTE_H_INCLUDED
#define PROMOTE_H_INCLUDED
#include <type_traits>
#include <boost/mpl/vector.hpp>
#include <boost/mpl/find.hpp>
#include <boost/mpl/next.hpp>
#include <boost/mpl/deref.hpp>
#include <boost/mpl/end.hpp>
#include "Is_Char.h"

/**
Created by Art 10/2011
*/
/*Promotes Integer type to one up in size range*/
template<class Integer>
struct Promote
{
    static_assert(std::is_integral<Integer>::value,"Non Integer type is not allowed.");
    /*Check correct type - depending on Integer being signed or unsigned*/
    typedef typename std::conditional<std::is_signed<Integer>::value,
                                boost::mpl::vector<signed char,short,int,long,long long>,
    boost::mpl::vector<unsigned char,unsigned short,unsigned int,long,long long>
                                     >::type types;
    /*
    Find this type from the list above - substituting Integer for signed or unsigned char iff Integer is of type char
    */
    typedef typename boost::mpl::find<types,
    typename std::conditional<Is_Char<Integer>::value,
    typename std::conditional<std::is_signed<Integer>::value,signed char,unsigned char>::type, Integer>::type>::type this_type;

    /*If Integer is int and if size of it is == to long promote int to long long (iterate to next element twice)*/
    typedef typename boost::mpl::eval_if<boost::mpl::bool_<((std::is_same<Integer,int>::value || std::is_same<Integer,unsigned int>::value)
                                                                && (sizeof(int) == sizeof(long)))>,
                                         boost::mpl::next<typename boost::mpl::next<this_type>::type>,
                                         boost::mpl::next<this_type>
                                        >::type next_type;
    /*Check if iterator points within range or if one pass end which means that Integer was u/long long*/
    typedef typename std::conditional<std::is_same<typename boost::mpl::end<types>::type,next_type>::value,Integer,typename boost::mpl::deref<next_type>::type>::type type;
};

#endif // PROMOTE_H_INCLUDED

/*Add two Int types*/
template<class A,class B,class R = Int<typename if_<!std::is_same<Int<A>,Int<B>>::value,
                                                    Choose_Larger<Int<A>,Int<B>>,
                                                    Promote<A>
                                                    >::type
                                        >
        >
R operator+(const Int<A>& left, const Int<B>& right)

{
    return add<R>(left,right);
}
share|improve this question
    
Perhaps a minimal, complete example would make the problem easier to locate. –  Kerrek SB Oct 30 '11 at 15:57
    
Seconded. Where's Int.h? Make this a single snippet and chop off things that are irrelevant. –  avakar Oct 30 '11 at 16:01
1  
This doesn't compile due to calling a nonexistent constructor. When I fix that it works fine. –  interjay Oct 30 '11 at 16:08
    
Works fine for me as well when using clang++ and g++ when fixing the constructor. –  Morten Kristensen Oct 30 '11 at 16:12
    
@smallB, you should trust us; you're more likely to get answers if people can copy-paste-compile your code. –  avakar Oct 30 '11 at 16:49

1 Answer 1

Well the question has changed since I started on this answer.

So it's really an answer to a question that no longer exists.

Anyway, for the alternative approach below, unfortunately Visual C++ 10.0 does not yet support the new C++11 function declaration syntax, but at least this compiles with both MSVC and g++:

#include <iostream>

template< class IntType >
struct Int
{
    IntType value_;
    explicit Int( IntType v = 0 ): value_( v ) {}
};

template< class IntA, class IntB >
Int< decltype( IntA() + IntB() ) > operator+( Int< IntA > a, Int< IntB > b )
{
    typedef decltype( IntA() + IntB() ) R; 
    return Int<R>( a.value_ + b.value_ );
}

int main()
{
    Int<int> a(5);
    Int<long> b(6);
    auto c = a + b;

    std::cout << c.value_ << std::endl;
}

Cheers & hth.,

share|improve this answer
    
yes it does work because I've listend to some guy and "simplified" example. I'll give you original one and see if you can do something about it. Ok? –  smallB Oct 30 '11 at 16:21

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