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I have a div with two images and an h1. All of them need to be vertically aligned within the div, next to each other. One of the images needs to be absolute positioned within the div.

What is the css needed for this to work on all common browsers?

  <div id=header">
      <img src=".." ></img>
      <h1>testing...</h1>
      <img src="..."></img>
    </div>
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I made a list of all ways to vertical align..I am going to leave it here: jsfiddle.net/techsin/FAwku/1 –  Muhammad Umer May 22 at 17:27

17 Answers 17

up vote 344 down vote accepted

Wow, this problem is popular. It's based on a misunderstanding in the vertical-align property. This excellent article explains it:

Understanding vertical-align, or "How (Not) To Vertically Center Content" by Gavin Kistner.


In a nutshell (and to prevent link rot):

  • Inline elements (and only inline elements) can be vertically aligned in their context via vertical-align: middle. However, the “context” isn’t the whole parent container height, it’s the height of the text line they’re in. jsfiddle example
  • For block elements, vertical alignment is harder and strongly depends on the specific situation:
    • If the inner element can have a fixed height, you can make its position absolute and specify its height, margin-top and top position. jsfiddle example
    • If the centered element consists of a single line and its parent height is fixed you can simply set the container’s line-height to fill its height. This method is quite versatile in my experience. jsfiddle example
    • … there are be more such special cases.
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7  
+1 for the fiddles, which clarified a misunderstanding for me. –  John Lehmann Mar 27 '13 at 23:14
25  
The problem with the "valid" solutions (so not the vertical-align: middle) is that you have to specify a fixed height. Not very possible for Responsive Web Design. –  Emilie May 14 '13 at 8:42
    
I had this structure: <div height="##px"> My Text </ div> Worked for me set the property lineHeight using the same value as used in div height property: '##px' (## because this value is dynamic in my case) thank you –  patricK Aug 24 '13 at 20:00
2  
This also works with inline-block and table-cell elements. If you are having issues with this, try adjusting line-height of the container element (i.e. context) since it is used in the vertical-align line box calculations. –  Alex W Oct 16 '13 at 19:14
2  
list of hacks..ways...etc. jsfiddle.net/techsin/FAwku/1 –  Muhammad Umer May 22 at 17:28

It worked for me :

.vcontainer {
   min-height: 10em;
   display: table-cell;
   vertical-align: middle;
}
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3  
So it's no longer "block" element? –  Pacerier Oct 12 '12 at 7:57
2  
Then if you want to horizontal align with margin : 0 auto, it won't work because of the display: table-cell –  Ortomala Lokni Jun 30 at 13:12

All of them need to be vertically aligned within the div

Aligned how? Tops of the images aligned with the top of the text?

One of the images needs to be absolute positioned within the div.

Absolutely positioned relative to the DIV? Perhaps you could sketch out what you're looking for...?

fd has described the steps for absolute positioning, as well as adjusting the display of the H1 element such that images will appear inline with it. To that, i'll add that you can align the images by use of the vertical-align style:

#header h1 { display: inline; }
#header img { vertical-align: middle; }

...this would put the header and images together, with top edges aligned. Other alignment options exist; see the documentation. You might also find it beneficial to drop the DIV and move the images inside the H1 element - this provides semantic value to the container, and removes the need to adjust the display of the H1:

<h1 id=header">
   <img src=".." ></img>
   testing...
   <img src="..."></img>
</h1>
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i used this very simple code:

HTML:

<div class="ext-box">
    <div class="int-box">
        <h2>Some txt</h2>
        <p>bla bla bla</p>
    </div>
</div>

CSS:

div.ext-box { display: table; }
div.int-box { display: table-cell; vertical-align: middle; }

...and it works for me. obviously using CLASS or ID won't change the result.. that's it all!

bye bye - Nicola

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Use this formula and it will works always without cracks

<div id="outer">
  <div id="middle">
    <div id="inner">
      any text
      any height
      any content, for example generated from DB
      everything is vertically centered
    </div>
  </div>
</div>

<style type="text/css">
#outer {height: 400px; overflow: hidden; position: relative;}
#outer[id] {display: table; position: static;}

#middle {position: absolute; top: 50%;} /* for explorer only*/
#middle[id] {display: table-cell; vertical-align: middle; width: 100%;}

#inner {position: relative; top: -50%} /* for explorer only */
/* optional: #inner[id] {position: static;} */
</style>
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A technique from a friend of mine:

html:

<div style="height:100px; border:1px solid;">
    <p style="border:1px dotted;">I'm vertically centered.</p>
</div>

css:

div:before {content:" "; display:inline-block; height:100%; vertical-align:middle;}
div p {display:inline-block;}

DEMO here

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I don't have a clue how content: " "; would help with vertically centering a div, but it works 0.o –  RobinJ Feb 18 '13 at 16:56
1  
this technique is described in more detail here: css-tricks.com/centering-in-the-unknown –  nerdess Jul 8 '13 at 13:45
1  
Works just for a single line.. –  Mr_Green Sep 13 '13 at 5:08
    
Nice, This worked awesome. –  Alpinestar22 Nov 11 at 21:39

By default h1 is a block element and will render on the line after the first img, and will cause the second img to appear on the line following the block.

To stop this from occurring you can set the h1 to have inline flow behaviour:

#header > h1 { display: inline; }

As for absolutely positioning the img inside the div, you need to set the containing div to have a "known size" before this will work properly. In my experience, you also need to change the position attribute away from the default - position: relative works for me:

#header { position: relative; width: 20em; height: 20em; }
#img-for-abs-positioning { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; }

If you can get that to work, you might want to try progressively removing the height, width, position attributes from div.header to get the minimal required attributes to get the effect you want.

UPDATE:

Here is a complete example that works on Firefox 3:

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN"
          "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">
<html>
    <head>
        <title>Example of vertical positioning inside a div</title>
        <style type="text/css">
            #header > h1 { display: inline; }
            #header { border: solid 1px red; 
                      position: relative; }
            #img-for-abs-positioning { position: absolute;
                                       bottom: -1em; right: 2em; }
        </style>
    </head>

    <body>
        <div id="header">
            <img src="#" alt="Image 1" width="40" height="40" />
            <h1>Header</h1>
            <img src="#" alt="Image 2" width="40" height="40" 
                 id="img-for-abs-positioning" />
        </div>
    </body>
</html>
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3  
I should note that having the right DOCTYPE can sometimes make big differences to how CSS will render, especially on Internet Explorer. I'd recommend you chose a DOCTYPE known to align with a strict standards mode so you can expect more consistent behaviour between browsers. –  fd. Sep 18 '08 at 17:14
2  
I wouldn't 'expect' any consistency between browsers.. only way to be sure is to test :/ –  Cocowalla Nov 10 '09 at 8:03

Almost all methods needs to specify the height, but often we don't have any heights.
So here is a CSS3 3 line trick that doesn't require to know the height.

.element {
    position: relative;
    top: 50%;
    transform: translateY(-50%);
}

It's supported even in IE9.

with its vendor prefixes:

.element {
    position: relative;
    top: 50%;
    -webkit-transform: translateY(-50%);
    -ms-transform: translateY(-50%);
    transform: translateY(-50%);
}

Source: http://zerosixthree.se/vertical-align-anything-with-just-3-lines-of-css/

share|improve this answer
    
but this seems work only when the height of element's parent is fixed. the property 'top' with percentage value only works in the container with fixed height, correct? –  ucdream May 14 at 6:05
    
Yes it works only for some cases, I had problems later with this methods... The thing is to have the most possibilities as possible and as soon as you need one you test all of them until you get the good one, because all methods got things that won't works in a specific case... –  Shadowbob May 14 at 8:46

why not just a one cell table inside the div! just set the cell and table height and with to 100% and you can use the vertical-align.

a one cell table inside the div handles the vertical-align and is backward compatible back to the stone age!

Sorry my last answer was incomplete I tried a code example and it didn't show.

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here is just another (responsive) apporach:

html,
    body {
        height: 100%;
    }
    body {
        margin: 0;
    }



    .table {
        display: table;
        width:  auto;
        table-layout:auto;
        height: 100%;
    }
        .table:nth-child(even) { 
            background: #a9edc3;
        }
        .table:nth-child(odd) { 
            background: #eda9ce;
        }

    .tr { 
        display: table-row; 
    }
    .td { 
        display: table-cell;
        width: 50%;
        vertical-align: middle;
    }

http://jsfiddle.net/herrfischerhamburg/JcVxz/

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I have been using the following solution (with no positioning and no line height) since over a year, it works with IE 7 and 8 as well.

<style>
.outer {
    font-size: 0;
    width: 400px;
    height: 400px;
    background: orange;
    text-align: center;
    display: inline-block;
}

.outer .emptyDiv {
    height: 100%;
    background: orange;
    visibility: collapse;
}

.outer .inner {
    padding: 10px;
    background: red;
    font: bold 12px Arial;
}

.verticalCenter {
    display: inline-block;
    *display: inline;
    zoom: 1;
    vertical-align: middle;
}
</style>

<div class="outer">
    <div class="emptyDiv verticalCenter"></div>
    <div class="inner verticalCenter">
        <p>Line 1</p>
        <p>Line 2</p>
    </div>
</div>
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This is my personal solution for an i element inside a div

JSFiddle Example

HTML

<div class="circle">
    <i class="fa fa-plus icon">
</i></div>

CSS

.circle {
   border-radius: 50%;
   color: blue;
   background-color: red;
   height:100px;
   width:100px;
   text-align: center;
   line-height: 100px;
}

.icon {
  font-size: 50px;
  vertical-align: middle;
}
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Please, avoid link only answer. –  M42 Sep 16 at 11:41
    
Now you can check my solution in JSFiddle @M42 –  danigonlinea Sep 16 at 11:41
    
Thank you M42 ;) –  danigonlinea Sep 16 at 11:48

To position block elements to the center (works ie9 and above), needs a wrapper div: .vcontainer { position: relative; top: 50%; transform: translateY(-50%); -webkit-transform: translateY(-50%); }

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My trick is to put inside the div a table with 1 row and 1 column, set 100% of width and height, and the property vertical-align:middle.

<div>

    <table style="width:100%; height:100%;">
        <tr>
            <td style="vertical-align:middle;">
                BUTTON TEXT
            </td>
        </tr>
    </table>

</div>

Fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/joan16v/sbqjnn9q/

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<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN">
<html>
<head>
<style type="text/css">
    #style_center { position:relative; top:50%; left:50%; }
    #style_center_absolute { position:absolute; top:50px; left:50px; }
    <!--#style_center { position:relative; top:50%; left:50%; height:50px; margin-top:-25px; }-->
</style>
</head>
<body>
    <div style="height:200px; width:200px; background:#00FF00">
        <div id="style_center">+</div>
    </div>
</body>
</html>
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why not just this

<div>
    <table style="width: 100%; height: 100%">
        <tr>
            <td style="width: 100%; height: 100%; vertical-align: middle;">
               What ever you want vertically-aligned
            </td>
        </tr>
    </table>
</div>

a one cell table inside the div handles the vertical-align and is backward compatible back to the stone age!

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<div id="header" style="display: table-cell; vertical-align:middle;">

...

or CSS

.someClass
{
   display: table-cell;
   vertical-align:middle;
}

Browser Coverage

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1  
The vertical-align property does not apply since the div is display: block by default and nothing appears to have been done to change it. –  Quentin Mar 12 '10 at 12:38
2  
Apparently the display was updated to table-cell, which makes vertical-align: middle; work. Even better, it works without needing a nested wrapper/buffer div, and it works for both text and images (or both), and you don't need to change the position properties. –  MSpreij Jun 24 '12 at 17:56
3  
This one works. It changes the display to table-cell which takes the vertical-align property. No idea why people vote this down. –  texasbruce Dec 17 '12 at 4:55
1  
yes, as far as i know this is the least intrusive way to center anything verticaly in a div. +1 –  Pma Jan 8 '13 at 0:22
    
Ok, maybe i was too quick with my conclusions... Adding display:table-cell breakes div margin and additionaly border is displayed outside div, border combined with border-radius displays rounded corners inside of the div istead of outside –  Pma Jan 9 '13 at 9:42

protected by Hashem Qolami Sep 23 at 9:50

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