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Is there a built in method in .NET to convert a number to the string representation of the number? For example, 1 becomes one, 2 becomes two, etc.

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I guess this is language and technology (not only .NET) independent question. –  KvanTTT Nov 7 '12 at 13:20

10 Answers 10

up vote 38 down vote accepted

I've always been a fan of the recursive method

  public static string NumberToText( int n)
  {
   if ( n < 0 )
      return "Minus " + NumberToText(-n);
   else if ( n == 0 )
      return "";
   else if ( n <= 19 )
      return new string[] {"One", "Two", "Three", "Four", "Five", "Six", "Seven", "Eight", 
         "Nine", "Ten", "Eleven", "Twelve", "Thirteen", "Fourteen", "Fifteen", "Sixteen", 
         "Seventeen", "Eighteen", "Nineteen"}[n-1] + " ";
   else if ( n <= 99 )
      return new string[] {"Twenty", "Thirty", "Forty", "Fifty", "Sixty", "Seventy", 
         "Eighty", "Ninety"}[n / 10 - 2] + " " + NumberToText(n % 10);
   else if ( n <= 199 )
      return "One Hundred " + NumberToText(n % 100);
   else if ( n <= 999 )
      return NumberToText(n / 100) + "Hundreds " + NumberToText(n % 100);
   else if ( n <= 1999 )
      return "One Thousand " + NumberToText(n % 1000);
   else if ( n <= 999999 )
      return NumberToText(n / 1000) + "Thousands " + NumberToText(n % 1000);
   else if ( n <= 1999999 )
      return "One Million " + NumberToText(n % 1000000);
   else if ( n <= 999999999)
      return NumberToText(n / 1000000) + "Millions " + NumberToText(n % 1000000);
   else if ( n <= 1999999999 )
      return "One Billion " + NumberToText(n % 1000000000);
   else 
      return NumberToText(n / 1000000000) + "Billions " + NumberToText(n % 1000000000);
}

Source

share|improve this answer
    
Nicely done, you should modify it at least to receive longs though. +1 –  BenAlabaster Apr 27 '09 at 19:04
3  
I liked your code as it was easier to follow than balabaster's. I modified it a bit to account for a single "0" parameter (returns "Zero"), to accept a long rather than an int, and to return Billion instead of Billions, Million instead of Millions, etc. Good code! –  Mike Cole Apr 27 '09 at 20:49
    
See my post for modified code. –  Mike Cole Apr 27 '09 at 20:51
    
@Ryan : i understood your solution but can you explain me the second square bracket operator you used when returning a new string ( if n <= 19 ), as i have not used that style before and didn't understand it. Thanks ! –  Neville Jun 13 at 19:41

Ah, there may not be a class to do this, but there was a code golf question which I provided a C# example for:

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/309884/code-golf-number-to-words/408776#408776

However, it's not the easiest to read and it only goes up to decimal.MaxValue, so I've written a new version that will go as high as you need to.

I couldn't find any information regarding values higher than vigintillions, but if you append the values to the thou[] array, you can continue going up as far as you like. It still doesn't support fractions, but I'm thinking about adding that at some point.

    static string NumericStringToWords(string NumericValue)
    {
        if ("0" == NumericValue) return "zero";

        string[] units = { "one", "two", "three", "four", "five", 
                           "six", "seven", "eight", "nine" };

        string[] teens = { "eleven", "twelve", "thirteen", "four", "fifteen", 
                           "sixteen", "seventeen", "eighteen", "nineteen" };

        string[] tens = { "ten", "twenty", "thirty", "forty", "fifty", 
                          "sixty", "seventy", "eighty", "ninety" };

        string[] thou = { "thousand", "million", "billion", "trillion", 
                          "quadrillion", "quintillion", "sextillion", 
                          "septillion", "octillion", "nonillion", "decillion", 
                          "udecillion", "duodecillion", "tredecillion", 
                          "quattuordecillion", "quindecillion", "sexdecillion", 
                          "septendecillion", "octodecillion", "novemdecillion", 
                          "vigintillion" };

        string sign = String.Empty;
        if ("-" == NumericValue.Substring(0, 1))
        {
            sign = "minus ";
            NumericValue = NumericValue.Substring(1);
        }

        int maxLen = thou.Length * 3;
        int actLen = NumericValue.Length;
        if(actLen > maxLen)
            throw new InvalidCastException(String.Format("{0} digit number specified exceeds the maximum length of {1} digits.  To evaluate this number, you must first expand the thou[] array.", actLen, maxLen));

        //Make sure that the value passed in is indeed numeric... we parse the entire string
        //rather than just cast to a numeric type to allow us to handle large number types passed
        //in as a string.  Otherwise, we're limited to the standard data type sizes.
        int n; //We don't care about n, but int.TryParse requires it
        if (!NumericValue.All(c => int.TryParse(c.ToString(), out n)))
            throw new InvalidCastException();

        string fraction = String.Empty;
        if (NumericValue.Contains("."))
        {
            string[] split = NumericValue.Split('.');
            NumericValue = split[0];
            fraction = split[1];
        }

        StringBuilder word = new StringBuilder();
        ulong loopCount = 0;

        while (0 < NumericValue.Length)
        {
            int startPos = Math.Max(0, NumericValue.Length - 3);
            string crntBlock = NumericValue.Substring(startPos);
            if (0 < crntBlock.Length)
            {
                //Grab the hundreds tens & units for the current block
                int h = crntBlock.Length > 2 ? int.Parse(crntBlock[crntBlock.Length - 3].ToString()) : 0;
                int t = crntBlock.Length > 1 ? int.Parse(crntBlock[crntBlock.Length - 2].ToString()) : 0;
                int u = crntBlock.Length > 0 ? int.Parse(crntBlock[crntBlock.Length - 1].ToString()) : 0;

                StringBuilder thisBlock = new StringBuilder();

                if (0 < u)
                    thisBlock.Append(1 == t? teens[u - 1] : units[u - 1]);

                if (1 != t)
                {
                    if (1 < t && 0 < u) thisB    
share|improve this answer
2  
+1 for going up so far... you should add decimal places too... –  BobTheBuilder Apr 27 '09 at 18:35
    
@BobTheBuilder: LOL, maybe, but I'm not sure how I'd write most of the fractions. Do you write them as hundredths, thousandths, or just "point zero five three nine..." or do you write them as actual fractions like three fifths etc.? –  BenAlabaster Apr 27 '09 at 18:42
    
How about .1 = "one tenth", .14 = "fourteen hundredths", .141 = "one hundred forty one thousandths" and so on? =P –  Neil Williams Apr 27 '09 at 19:20
    
It's under consideration :) –  BenAlabaster Apr 27 '09 at 19:26
1  
@Neil Williams: Actually, I'm not sure that would work so well on larger numbers or on long fractions as it could make it more confusing to read than using point zero seven nine... etc. –  BenAlabaster Apr 28 '09 at 17:23

This thread was a great help. I like Ryan Emerle's solution the best for its clarity. Here's my version which I think makes the structure clear as day:

public static class Number
{
    static string[] first =
    {
        "Zero", "One", "Two", "Three", "Four", "Five", "Six", "Seven", "Eight", "Nine",
        "Ten", "Eleven", "Twelve", "Thirteen", "Fourteen", "Fifteen", "Sixteen",
        "Seventeen", "Eighteen", "Nineteen"
    };
    static string[] tens =
    {
        "Twenty", "Thirty", "Fourty", "Fifty", "Sixty", "Seventy", "Eighty", "Ninety",
    };

    /// <summary>
    /// Converts the given number to an english sentence.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="n">The number to convert.</param>
    /// <returns>The string representation of the number.</returns>
    public static string ToSentence(int n)
    {
        return n == 0 ? first[n] : Step(n);
    }
    // traverse the number recursively
    public static string Step(int n)
    {
        return n < 0            ? "Minus " + Step(-n):
               n == 0           ? "":
               n <= 19          ? first[n]:
               n <= 99          ? tens[n / 10 - 2] + " " + Step(n % 10):
               n <= 199         ? "One Hundred " + Step(n % 100):
               n <= 999         ? Step(n / 100) + "Hundred " + Step(n % 100):
               n <= 1999        ? "One Thousand " + Step(n % 1000):
               n <= 999999      ? Step(n / 1000) + "Thousand " + Step(n % 1000):
               n <= 1999999     ? "One Million " + Step(n % 1000000):
               n <= 999999999   ? Step(n / 1000000) + "Million " + Step(n % 1000000):
               n <= 1999999999  ? "One Billion " + Step(n % 1000000000):
                                  Step(n / 1000000000) + "Billion " + Step(n % 1000000000);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for clarity and making the "constants" a static value, as opposed to the other solutions declaring them inline. –  drzaus Feb 15 '13 at 16:52
public string IntToString(int number)//nobody really uses negative numbers
{
    if(number == 0)
        return "zero";
    else
        if(number == 1)
            return "one";
        .......
        else
            if(number == 2147483647)
                return "two billion one hundred forty seven million four hundred eighty three thousand six hundred forty seven";
}
share|improve this answer
3  
Didn't I see this on Daily WTF? –  Mike Cole Apr 29 '09 at 19:27
4  
No, but it should be. What was I thinking with all those else if's. I should have used a switch. –  Kevin Apr 30 '09 at 17:57
    
I'm tempted to downvote this, but it's so bad that it actually reversed my decision.. +1 for humor sense. –  nawfal Dec 29 '13 at 23:59

Here is the modified code I used:

//Wrapper class for NumberToText(int n) to account for single zero parameter.
public static string ConvertToStringRepresentation(long number)
{
    string result = null;

    if (number == 0)
    {
        result = "Zero";
    }
    else
    {
        result = NumberToText(number);
    }

    return result;
}

//Found at http://www.dotnet2themax.com/blogs/fbalena/PermaLink,guid,cdceca73-08cd-4c15-aef7-0f9c8096e20a.aspx.
//Modifications from original source:
//  Changed parameter type from int to long.
//  Changed labels to be singulars instead of plurals (Billions to Billion, Millions to Million, etc.).
private static string NumberToText(long n)
{
    if (n < 0)
        return "Minus " + NumberToText(-n);
    else if (n == 0)
        return "";
    else if (n <= 19)
        return new string[] {"One", "Two", "Three", "Four", "Five", "Six", "Seven", "Eight", 
                                "Nine", "Ten", "Eleven", "Twelve", "Thirteen", "Fourteen", "Fifteen", "Sixteen", 
                                "Seventeen", "Eighteen", "Nineteen"}[n - 1] + " ";
    else if (n <= 99)
        return new string[] {"Twenty", "Thirty", "Forty", "Fifty", "Sixty", "Seventy", 
                                "Eighty", "Ninety"}[n / 10 - 2] + " " + NumberToText(n % 10);
    else if (n <= 199)
        return "One Hundred " + NumberToText(n % 100);
    else if (n <= 999)
        return NumberToText(n / 100) + "Hundred " + NumberToText(n % 100);
    else if (n <= 1999)
        return "One Thousand " + NumberToText(n % 1000);
    else if (n <= 999999)
        return NumberToText(n / 1000) + "Thousand " + NumberToText(n % 1000);
    else if (n <= 1999999)
        return "One Million " + NumberToText(n % 1000000);
    else if (n <= 999999999)
        return NumberToText(n / 1000000) + "Million " + NumberToText(n % 1000000);
    else if (n <= 1999999999)
        return "One Billion " + NumberToText(n % 1000000000);
    else
        return NumberToText(n / 1000000000) + "Billion " + NumberToText(n % 1000000000);
}
share|improve this answer

Based on Ryan Emerle's solution, this adds dashes at the correct locations, does not include trailing spaces, does not pluralize numbers, and properly handles an input of zero (0):

public static string ToText(long n) {
    return _toText(n, true);
}
private static string _toText(long n, bool isFirst = false) {
    string result;
    if(isFirst && n == 0) {
        result = "Zero";
    } else if(n < 0) {
        result = "Negative " + _toText(-n);
    } else if(n == 0) {
        result = "";
    } else if(n <= 9) {
        result = new[] { "One", "Two", "Three", "Four", "Five", "Six", "Seven", "Eight", "Nine" }[n - 1] + " ";
    } else if(n <= 19) {
        result = new[] { "Ten", "Eleven", "Twelve", "Thirteen", "Fourteen", "Fifteen", "Sixteen", "Seventeen", "Eighteen", "Nineteen" }[n - 10] + (isFirst ? null : " ");
    } else if(n <= 99) {
        result = new[] { "Twenty", "Thirty", "Forty", "Fifty", "Sixty", "Seventy", "Eighty", "Ninety" }[n / 10 - 2] + (n % 10 > 0 ? "-" + _toText(n % 10) : null);
    } else if(n <= 999) {
        result = _toText(n / 100) + "Hundred " + _toText(n % 100);
    } else if(n <= 999999) {
        result = _toText(n / 1000) + "Thousand " + _toText(n % 1000);
    } else if(n <= 999999999) {
        result = _toText(n / 1000000) + "Million " + _toText(n % 1000000);
    } else {
        result = _toText(n / 1000000000) + "Billion " + _toText(n % 1000000000);
    }
    if(isFirst) {
        result = result.Trim();
    }
    return result;
}
share|improve this answer

A conversion from integer to long form English... I could write that ;-) is a pretty good article on the topic:

using System;

public class NumberToEnglish {
    private static string[] onesMapping =
        new string[] {
            "Zero", "One", "Two", "Three", "Four", "Five", "Six", "Seven", "Eight", "Nine",
            "Ten", "Eleven", "Twelve", "Thirteen", "Fourteen", "Fifteen", "Sixteen", "Seventeen", "Eighteen", "Nineteen"
        };
    private static string[] tensMapping =
        new string[] {
            "Twenty", "Thirty", "Forty", "Fifty", "Sixty", "Seventy", "Eighty", "Ninety"
        };
    private static string[] groupMapping =
        new string[] {
            "Hundred", "Thousand", "Million", "Billion", "Trillion"
        };

    private static void Main(string[] args) {
        Console.WriteLine(EnglishFromNumber(long.Parse(args[0])));
    }

    private static string EnglishFromNumber(int number) {
        return EnglishFromNumber((long) number);
    }

    private static string EnglishFromNumber(long number) {
        if ( number == 0 ) {
            return onesMapping[number];
        }

        string sign = "Positive";
        if ( number < 0 ) {
            sign = "Negative";
            number = Math.Abs(number);
        }

        string retVal = null;
        int group = 0;
        while(number > 0) {
            int numberToProcess = (int) (number % 1000);
            number = number / 1000;

            string groupDescription = ProcessGroup(numberToProcess);
            if ( groupDescription != null ) {
                if ( group > 0 ) {
                    retVal = groupMapping[group] + " " + retVal;
                }
                retVal = groupDescription + " " + retVal;
            }

            group++;
        }

        return sign + " " + retVal;
    }

    private static string ProcessGroup(int number) {
        int tens = number % 100;
        int hundreds = number / 100;

        string retVal = null;
        if ( hundreds > 0 ) {
            retVal = onesMapping[hundreds] + " " + groupMapping[0];
        }
        if ( tens > 0 ) {
            if ( tens < 20 ) {
                retVal += ((retVal != null) ? " " : "") + onesMapping[tens];
            } else {
                int ones = tens % 10;
                tens = (tens / 10) - 2; // 20's offset

                retVal += ((retVal != null) ? " " : "") + tensMapping[tens];

                if ( ones > 0 ) {
                    retVal += ((retVal != null) ? " " : "") + onesMapping[ones];
                }
            }
        }

        return retVal;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Obviously not a code golf contender :P –  BenAlabaster Apr 27 '09 at 18:30
1  
@balabaster: Nor as inclusive as your code golf version, but it is easier to read –  BobTheBuilder Apr 27 '09 at 18:36
    
@BobTheBuilder: Yeah, but like I said, that's not the purpose of code golf :P –  BenAlabaster Apr 27 '09 at 18:39

There's no built in solution in .net, but there are good libraries around. The best currently is definitely Humanizr:

Console.WriteLine(794663.ToWords()); // => seven hundred and ninety-four thousand six hundred and sixty-three

It also supports ordinal, and roman representations:

Console.WriteLine(794663.ToOrdinalWords()); // => seven hundred and ninety-four thousand six hundred and sixty third
Console.WriteLine(794.ToRoman()); // => DCCXCIV

Humanizr also has a wide range of tools regarding string, DateTime, TimeSpan and so forth.

Console.WriteLine(794.Seconds().Humanize().Underscore().Hyphenate()); // => 13-minutes
share|improve this answer

Here's my refined version of the first answer. I hope it's useful.

/// <summary>
/// Converts an <see cref="int"/> to its textual representation
/// </summary>
/// <param name="num">
/// The number to convert to text
/// </param>
/// <returns>
/// A textual representation of the given number
/// </returns>
public static string ToText(this int num)
{
    StringBuilder result;

    if (num < 0)
    {
        return string.Format("Minus {0}", ToText(-num));
    }

    if (num == 0)
    {
        return "Zero";
    }

    if (num <= 19)
    {
        var oneToNineteen = new[]
        {
            "One",
            "Two",
            "Three",
            "Four",
            "Five",
            "Six",
            "Seven",
            "Eight",
            "Nine",
            "Ten",
            "Eleven",
            "Twelve",
            "Thirteen",
            "Fourteen",
            "Fifteen",
            "Sixteen",
            "Seventeen",
            "Eighteen",
            "Nineteen"
        };

        return oneToNineteen[num - 1];
    }

    if (num <= 99)
    {
        result = new StringBuilder();

        var multiplesOfTen = new[]
        {
            "Twenty",
            "Thirty",
            "Forty",
            "Fifty",
            "Sixty",
            "Seventy",
            "Eighty",
            "Ninety"
        };

        result.Append(multiplesOfTen[(num / 10) - 2]);

        if (num % 10 != 0)
        {
            result.Append(" ");
            result.Append(ToText(num % 10));
        }

        return result.ToString();
    }

    if (num == 100)
    {
        return "One Hundred";
    }

    if (num <= 199)
    {
        return string.Format("One Hundred and {0}", ToText(num % 100));
    }

    if (num <= 999)
    {
        result = new StringBuilder((num / 100).ToText());
        result.Append(" Hundred");
        if (num % 100 != 0)
        {
            result.Append(" and ");
            result.Append((num % 100).ToText());
        }

        return result.ToString();
    }

    if (num <= 999999)
    {
        result = new StringBuilder((num / 1000).ToText());
        result.Append(" Thousand");
        if (num % 1000 != 0)
        {
            switch ((num % 1000) < 100)
            {
                case true:
                    result.Append(" and ");
                    break;
                case false:
                    result.Append(", ");
                    break;
            }

            result.Append((num % 1000).ToText());
        }

        return result.ToString();
    }

    if (num <= 999999999)
    {
        result = new StringBuilder((num / 1000000).ToText());
        result.Append(" Million");
        if (num % 1000000 != 0)
        {
            switch ((num % 1000000) < 100)
            {
                case true:
                    result.Append(" and ");
                    break;
                case false:
                    result.Append(", ");
                    break;
            }

            result.Append((num % 1000000).ToText());
        }

        return result.ToString();
    }

    result = new StringBuilder((num / 1000000000).ToText());
    result.Append(" Billion");
    if (num % 1000000000 != 0)
    {
        switch ((num % 1000000000) < 100)
        {
            case true:
                result.Append(" and ");
                break;
            case false:
                result.Append(", ");
                break;
        }

        result.Append((num % 1000000000).ToText());
    }

    return result.ToString();
}
share|improve this answer

Another naasking, version in VB.NET if any one is interested! Had to use the floor function to round properly..

 Public Function NumberToText(n As Integer) As String
        Dim a As String() = {"One", "Two", "Three", "Four", "Five", "Six", "Seven", "Eight", "Nine", "Ten", "Eleven", "Twelve", "Thirteen", "Fourteen", "Fifteen", "Sixteen", "Seventeen", "Eighteen", "Nineteen"}
        Dim tens As String() = {"Twenty", "Thirty", "Forty", "Fifty", "Sixty", "Seventy",
         "Eighty", "Ninety"}

        If (n < 0) Then
            Return "Minus " + NumberToText(-n)
        ElseIf (n = 0) Then
            Return ""
        ElseIf (n <= 19) Then
            Return a(n - 1) + " "
        ElseIf (n <= 99) Then
            Return tens(Math.Floor(n / 10) - 2) + " " + NumberToText(n Mod 10)
        ElseIf (n <= 199) Then
            Return "One Hundred " + NumberToText(n Mod 100)
        ElseIf (n <= 999) Then
            Return NumberToText(Math.Floor(n / 100)) + "Hundreds " + NumberToText(n Mod 100)
        ElseIf (n <= 1999) Then
            Return "One Thousand " + NumberToText(n Mod 1000)
        ElseIf (n <= 999999) Then
            Return NumberToText(Math.Floor(n / 1000)) + "Thousands " + NumberToText(n Mod 1000)
        ElseIf (n <= 1999999) Then
            Return "One Million " + NumberToText(n Mod 1000000)
        ElseIf (n <= 999999999) Then
            Return NumberToText(Math.Floor(n / 1000000)) + "Millions " + NumberToText(n Mod 1000000)
        ElseIf (n <= 1999999999) Then
            Return "One Billion " + NumberToText(n Mod 1000000000)
        Else
            Return NumberToText(Math.Floor(n / 1000000000)) + "Billions " + NumberToText(n Mod 1000000000)
        End If

    End Function
share|improve this answer

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