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I am using nginx on Rackspace cloud following a tutorial, searched the net and so far can't get this sorted.

I want www.mysite.com to go to mysite.com as normal in .htaccess for seo and other reasons.

My vi /etc/nginx/sites-available/www.example.com.vhost code:

server {
       listen 80;
       server_name www.example.com example.com;
       root /var/www/www.example.com/web;

       if ($http_host != "www.example.com") {
                 rewrite ^ http://example.com$request_uri permanent;
       }

I have also tried

server {
       listen 80;
       server_name example.com;
       root /var/www/www.example.com/web;

       if ($http_host != "www.example.com") {
                 rewrite ^ http://example.com$request_uri permanent;
       }

I also tried. Both the second attempts give redirect loop errors.

if ($host = 'www.example.com' ) {
rewrite ^ http://example.com$uri permanent;
}

My DNS is setup as standard:

site.com 192.192.6.8 A type at 300 seconds
www.site.com 192.192.6.8 A type at 300 seconds

(example IPs and folders have been used for examples and to help people in future). I use Ubuntu 11.

share|improve this question

10 Answers 10

up vote 453 down vote accepted

HTTP Solution

From the documentation, "the right way is to define a separate server for example.org":

server {
    listen       80;
    server_name  example.com;
    return       301 http://www.example.com$request_uri;
}

server {
    listen       80;
    server_name  www.example.com;
    ...
}

HTTPS Solution

For those who want a solution including https://...

server {
        listen 80;
        server_name www.domain.com;
        # $scheme will get the http protocol
        # and 301 is best practice for tablet, phone, desktop and seo
        return 301 $scheme://domain.com$request_uri;
}

server {
        listen 80;
        server_name domain.com;
        # here goes the rest of your config file
        # example 
        location / {

            rewrite ^/cp/login?$ /cp/login.php last;
            # etc etc...

        }
}

Note: I have not originally included https:// in my solution since we use loadbalancers and our https:// server is a high-traffic SSL payment server: we do not mix https:// and http://.


To check the nginx version, use nginx -v.

Strip www from url with nginx redirect

server {
    server_name  www.domain.com;
    rewrite ^(.*) http://domain.com$1 permanent;
}

server {
    server_name  domain.com;
    #The rest of your configuration goes here#
}

So you need to have TWO server codes.

Add the www to the url with nginx redirect

If what you need is the opposite, to redirect from domain.com to www.domain.com, you can use this:

server {
    server_name  domain.com;
    rewrite ^(.*) http://www.domain.com$1 permanent;
}

server {
    server_name  www.domain.com;
    #The rest of your configuration goes here#
}

As you can imagine, this is just the opposite and works the same way the first example. This way, you don't get SEO marks down, as it is complete perm redirect and move. The no WWW is forced and the directory shown!

Some of my code shown below for a better view:

server {
    server_name  www.google.com;
    rewrite ^(.*) http://google.com$1 permanent;
}
server {
       listen 80;
       server_name google.com;
       index index.php index.html;
       ####
       # now pull the site from one directory #
       root /var/www/www.google.com/web;
       # done #
       location = /favicon.ico {
                log_not_found off;
                access_log off;
       }
}
share|improve this answer
13  
+1 For the level of detail –  puk Nov 30 '11 at 10:38
3  
@puk appreciate it. Nginx is amazing, but good documentation that stays up to date with server version and OS and server hardware changes is quite tiresome. The best resource that serves me is howtoforge.com as it supports the RackSpace cloud versions. Some of the commands above won't work in later versions. But this nginx/0.8.54 - is believe me, the best nginx server) no need to upgrade or update. Works fine. 100,000 unique hits a day with 4200 transactions average a day. Nginx is RAPID. like using a site with no traffic. –  TheBlackBenzKid Nov 30 '11 at 18:11
10  
Your rewrites should become returns, as in return 301 $scheme://domain.com$request_uri;. There is no need to capture any patterns, see Nginx pitfalls –  Rob Oct 10 '12 at 20:08
2  
@TheBlackBenzKid Sorry, maybe I have missed something, but updated solution is not working. It's because listen 80 - with that, you are saying that only HTTP is matching this. There should be more ports to listen if same configuration is used for HTTP and HTTPS... Or? But definitelly helped me, +1. Thanks for reply. Cheers. –  tomis May 14 '13 at 21:02
3  
@TheBlackBenzKid It was just note. I have found out working solution. In your example, only Listen 443 should be added and complete working. –  tomis May 15 '13 at 11:33

Actually you don't even need a rewrite.

server {
    #listen 80 is default
    server_name www.example.com;
    return 301 $scheme://example.com$request_uri;
}

server {
    #listen 80 is default
    server_name example.com;
    ## here goes the rest of your conf...
}

As my answer is getting more and more up votes but the above as well. You should never use a rewrite in this context. Why? Because nginx has to process and start a search. If you use return (which should be available in any nginx version) it directly stops execution. This is preferred in any context.

Redirect both, non-SSL and SSL to their non-www counterpart:

server {
    listen 80;
    listen 443 ssl;
    server_name www.example.com;
    return 301 $scheme://example.com$request_uri;
}

server {
    listen 80;
    listen 443 ssl;
    server_name example.com;
    # rest goes here...
}

The $scheme variable will only contain http if your server is only listening on port 80 (default) and the listen option does not contain the ssl keyword. Not using the variable will not gain you any performance.

Redirect everything to SSL (personal config on UNIX with IPv4, IPv6, SPDY, ...):

#
# Redirect all www to non-www
#
server {
    server_name          www.example.com;
    ssl_certificate      ssl/example.com/crt;
    ssl_certificate_key  ssl/example.com/key;
    listen               *:80;
    listen               *:443 ssl spdy;
    listen               [::]:80 ipv6only=on;
    listen               [::]:443 ssl spdy ipv6only=on;

    return 301 https://example.com$request_uri;
}

#
# Redirect all non-encrypted to encrypted
#
server {
    server_name          example.com;
    listen               *:80;
    listen               [::]:80;

    return 301 https://example.com$request_uri;
}

#
# There we go!
#
server {
    server_name          example.com;
    ssl_certificate      ssl/example.com/crt;
    ssl_certificate_key  ssl/example.com/key;
    listen               *:443 ssl spdy;
    listen               [::]:443 ssl spdy;

    # rest goes here...
}

I guess you can imagine other compounds with this pattern now by yourself.

More of my configs? Go here and here.

share|improve this answer
4  
Thanks for this. Repped. –  TheBlackBenzKid Aug 22 '12 at 14:57
    
Is there a need for the $scheme variable? –  Chuan Ma Mar 25 '13 at 10:24
    
What do you want to do? Normally you use an absolute URL but to be honest I never tried a protocol relative URL in the location block (e.g. //example.com$request_uri). Of course you can use a absolute URL without any host (e.g. /new_uri) but that doesn't make sense in this context. –  Fleshgrinder Mar 30 '13 at 1:16
    
@Fleshgrinder I used your setup and keep getting problems with www won't work... keep getting a HSTS failure in chrome. Any idea on that? –  chuck reynolds Aug 9 '14 at 2:15
1  
Your Chrome shouldn't be able to go to the www domain of yours if you're using HSTS. Please open a new question with as many details as possible and I'll help you (you can post the URL to the question as a comment here). –  Fleshgrinder Aug 9 '14 at 6:26

Here's how to do it for multiple www to no-www server names (I used this for subdomains):

server {
        server_name 
             "~^www\.(sub1.example.com)$"
             "~^www\.(sub2.example.com)$"
             "~^www\.(sub3.example.com)$";
         return 301 $scheme://$1$request_uri ;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is very smart; plus + 1 for this. –  TheBlackBenzKid Dec 11 '14 at 11:02

not sure if anyone notice it may be correct to return a 301 but browsers choke on it to doing

rewrite ^(.*)$ https://yoursite.com$1; 

is faster than:

return 301 $scheme://yoursite.com$request_uri;
share|improve this answer

Ghost blog

in order to make nginx recommended method with return 301 $scheme://example.com$request_uri; work with Ghost you will need to add in your main server block:

proxy_set_header    X-Real-IP           $remote_addr;
proxy_set_header    X-Forwarded-For     $proxy_add_x_forwarded_for;
proxy_set_header    Host                $http_host;
proxy_set_header    X-Forwarded-Proto   $scheme;
proxy_set_header    X-NginX-Proxy       true;

proxy_pass_header   X-CSRF-TOKEN;
proxy_buffering     off;
proxy_redirect      off;  
share|improve this answer

Unique format:

server {
  listen 80;
  server_name "~^www\.(.*)$" ;
  return 301 https://$1$request_uri ;
}
share|improve this answer

This will work for any domain:

if ($host ~* ^www\.(.*)$) {
    rewrite / http://$1 permanent;
}
share|improve this answer

This will remove www before any domain:

if ($host ~* ^www\.(.*)$) {
    rewrite / http://$1 permanent;
}
share|improve this answer

try this

    if ($host !~* ^www\.){
        rewrite ^(.*)$ https://www.yoursite.com$1;
    }
share|improve this answer
1  
Generally best to avoid If's as outlined: wiki.nginx.org/IfIsEvil –  Drew Jun 29 '14 at 1:11
    
Why did the authors provide an if-statement in nginx and then tell people to avoid it? Sounds flippant to me. –  GregSmethells Mar 30 at 18:06
    
There is stated "IF in location is evil". You can safely put if into your server block –  Kukman Apr 1 at 19:56

If you are having trouble getting this working, you may need to add the IP address of your server. For example:

server {
listen XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX:80;
listen XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX:443 ssl;
ssl_certificate /var/www/example.com/web/ssl/example.com.crt;
ssl_certificate_key /var/www/example.com/web/ssl/example.com.key;
server_name www.example.com;
return 301 $scheme://example.com$request_uri;
}

where XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX is the IP address (obviously).

Note: ssl crt and key location must be defined to properly redirect https requests

Don't forget to restart nginx after making the changes:

service nginx restart
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3  
/etc/init.d/nginx reload you can reload the server too which does not cause any downtime. –  TheBlackBenzKid Oct 29 '13 at 15:03

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