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As part of an assignment for a data structures class, I am trying to get this over a decade-old code to actually work. The code is found here: http://www.brpreiss.com/books/opus4/

(And to all of the users here who are horrified at such bad design, take heart - this is a homework assignment where the goal is ostensibly to get someone else's code to work. I am not advocating its use.)

Here, the author defined the class Stack and its associated Iterator:

#ifndef STACK_H
#define STACK_H

#include "linkList.h"
#include "container.h"

class Stack : public virtual Container
{
public:

    virtual Object& Top () const = 0;
    virtual void Push (Object&) = 0;
    virtual Object& Pop () = 0;
};

class StackAsLinkedList : public Stack
{
    LinkedList<Object*> list;
    class Iter;

public:

    StackAsLinkedList () : list() {}
    ~StackAsLinkedList() { Purge(); }

    //
    // Push, Pop and Top
    //
    void Push(Object& object);
    Object& Pop() override;
    Object& Top() const override;

    int CompareTo(Object const& obj) const;

    //
    // purge elements from, and accept elements onto, the list
    //
    void Purge();
     void Accept (Visitor&) const;

     friend class Iter;
 };

class StackAsLinkedList::Iter : public Iterator
{
    StackAsLinkedList const& stack;
    ListElement<Object*> const* position;

public:

    Iter (StackAsLinkedList const& _stack) : stack(_stack) { Reset(); }

    //
    // determine whether iterator is pointing at null
    //
    bool IsDone() const { return position == 0; }

    //
    // overloaded dereference and increment operator
    //
    Object& operator*() const;
    void   operator++();

    void Reset() { position = stack.list.Head(); }
};

#endif

I am not sure what the objective is here, because trying to instantiate a StackAsLinkedList::Iter will predictably give an error because it is private. Furthermore, the author doesn't use the iterator he just implemented for stack in the below example, which instead uses the iterator defined in the parent class of Stack called Container to traverse the stack and print the values:

StackAsLinkedList stack;
Iter& i = stack.NewIterator();

stack.Push(*new Int(1) );     //type "Int" is a Wrapper for primitive "int"
stack.Push(*new Int(2) );
...

while ( ! outIter.IsDone() )
{
    cout << *outIter << endl;
    ++outIter;
}

...

But when he creates stack.NewIterator(), a look at the method call in Container shows:

virtual Iterator& NewIterator () const { return *new NullIterator (); }

So the conditional in the while statement will always fail and thus the body will never execute.

This leads me to believe that I should be implementing another NewIterator method for Stack, but I am not sure what the return value should be ( *new StackAsLinkedList::Iter(_stack) ?).

Any ideas?

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3  
so - is your homework fixing this guys ancient book? –  sehe Oct 30 '11 at 19:28
2  
It's a really bad idea to return *new something because you'll forget to delete it. –  Seth Carnegie Oct 30 '11 at 19:28
3  
-1 To discourage others from using this code. Not clear why you'd want an iterator for the stack -- compared to a list, isn't the point that you can't do much other than pushing and popping? –  phooji Oct 30 '11 at 19:32
1  
@phooji: this is quite unfair to give me a -1. Perhaps I wasn't clear enough when I tagged this as homework, but this is indeed a homework assignment which requires me to fix this guy's "ancient code". Don't assume that I am advocating its use. I am merely asking for help to get this assignment working, per the instructions for this assignment. –  Dylan Oct 30 '11 at 19:45
1  
@phooji: Also, it is my understanding that software engineers working in industry do have to maintain legacy-code, however poorly written. So this might be beneficial to those that are dealing with the same problems of maintaining poorly designed code (but code which works nonetheless). –  Dylan Oct 30 '11 at 19:47

1 Answer 1

Adding the following method in StackAsLinkedList seemed to clear up the problem:

Iterator& StackAsLinkedList::NewIterator() const
{ 
    return *new Iter(*this); 
}

Also, the order of assignment in main() was also an issue. This seemed to correct it:

StackAsLinkedList stack;

stack.Push(*new Int(1) );     //type "Int" is a Wrapper for primitive "int"
stack.Push(*new Int(2) );
...

Iter& i = stack.NewIterator();

while ( ! outIter.IsDone() )
{
    cout << *outIter << endl;
    ++outIter;
}

I realize that this solution is not ideal - ideally I should refactor or better yet just start over (or just use STL). But as I said above, the goal was to just get this stuff to compile and work within a limited time-frame. So to echo what others have said: please don't use this code!

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