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why invoking a method by reflection is much slower than making a interface then recall it by reflection. the first version shows the tedious way the other version shows the enhanced way??

 // first version
  class A
    {
        public void fn()
        { 
        }
    }
  void Main(String[]x)
  {
        Type type = typeof(A);
        object obj = Activator.CreateInstance(type);
        type.InvokeMember("fn", BindingFlags.Public, null, obj, null);
  }

  //second verison
   interface IA
    {
        void fn();
    }

    class A :IA
    {
        public void fn()
        {
        }
    }

 void Main(String []x)
 {
        Type type = typeof(A);
        IA obj =(IA) Activator.CreateInstance(type);
        obj.fn();
 }
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3  
You aren't reflecting a method call in the second example; all you're doing is calling a method normally. Also, you didn't provide any benchmarks. –  BoltClock Oct 30 '11 at 21:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Reflection-based method calls are extremely slow, since you need to do member lookup and parameter binding and other things at runtime.

Interface methods, by contrast, are called with a regular callvirt instruction using the vtable.

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what about invoke menber method which method it used? –  Hussein Zawawi Oct 30 '11 at 23:04
    
InvokeMember, like the rest of the Type class, is reflection. –  SLaks Oct 30 '11 at 23:05
    
how the reflection call works? –  Hussein Zawawi Oct 30 '11 at 23:06
1  
Using magic inside the CLR. –  SLaks Oct 30 '11 at 23:08
    
that as u said much slower than using callvirt right?? –  Hussein Zawawi Oct 30 '11 at 23:15

For an apples to apples comparison, call Type.GetConstructor to get a ConstructorInfo object and invoke that to create your object. You can then keep the ConstructorInfo around and reuse. Activator is very slow in comparison.

Answering your question about how the reflection way works:

Activator searches the Metadata of the loaded assemblies for a type name that matches what you've specified. It then searches for a constructor similar to Type.GetConstructor, which returns a ConstructorInfo. It calls that constructor and returns the object.

Then when you call Type.InvokeMember, you're using reflection again, querying the metadata of the class to find the matching method signature. This is returned as a MethodInfo which is then invoked.

The hard work in reflection isn't the call itself, it's the metadata searches for the type, constructor, and method. That's why I was saying you can make relatively high performance method calls on reflected objects by reusing the ConstructorInfo and MethodInfo objects. You'll find repeatedly calling MethodInfo.Invoke is much faster than Type.InvokeMember

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I disagree. If you break down the Activator call and the invoke member call to their actual implementations, it involves getting ContructorInfo and MethodInfo. Interfaces use or static method call that doesn't need the MethodInfo lookup –  Jeremiah Gowdy Oct 30 '11 at 23:12

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