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What's the difference between a Python module and a Python package?

See also: What's the difference between "package" and "module" (for other languages)

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1  
I might be wrong but for me: a module is basically one python file. A package is a folder with a bunch of modules (python files). –  lc2817 Oct 30 '11 at 22:56
12  
To be considered a package, that folder must contain an __init__.py file. –  Giulio Piancastelli Oct 30 '11 at 23:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 104 down vote accepted

A module is a single file (or files) that are imported under one import and used. e.g.

import my_module

A package is a collection of modules in directories that give a package hierarchy.

from my_package.timing.danger.internets import function_of_love

Documentation for modules

Introduction to packages

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44  
+6 for the function_of_love ? –  Jakob Bowyer Oct 30 '11 at 23:47
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The function_of_love just keeps on giving. –  Jakob Bowyer Oct 29 '13 at 15:30
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When you say: "A module is a single file (or files) that are imported under one import" can you explain the situation where a module is more than one file? Or am I misreading what you mean? –  User Dec 1 '13 at 11:01
    
I gave +1 for function of love..lolz –  hagubear Mar 2 at 17:07
    
May I ask what's a function_of_love? Is it some slang with some interesting stories underneath? –  zhangxaochen Mar 10 at 10:07

Any Python file is a module, its name being the file's base name without the .py extension. A package is a collection of Python modules: while a module is a single Python file, a package is a directory of Python modules containing an additional __init__.py file, to distinguish a package from a directory that just happens to contain a bunch of Python scripts. Packages can be nested at any deep, providing that the corresponding directories contain their own __init__.py file.

The distinction between module and package seems to hold just at the file system level. When you import a module or a package, the corresponding object created by Python is always of type module. Note, however, when you import a package, only variables/functions/classes in the __init__.py file of that package are directly visible, not sub-packages or modules. As an example, consider the xml package in the Python standard library: its xml directory contains an __init__.py file and four sub-directories; the sub-directory etree contains an __init__.py file and, among others, an ElementTree.py file. See what happens when you try to interactively import package/modules:

>>> import xml
>>> type(xml)
<type 'module'>
>>> xml.etree.ElementTree
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
AttributeError: 'module' object has no attribute 'etree'
>>> import xml.etree
>>> type(xml.etree)
<type 'module'>
>>> xml.etree.ElementTree
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
AttributeError: 'module' object has no attribute 'ElementTree'
>>> import xml.etree.ElementTree
>>> type(xml.etree.ElementTree)
<type 'module'>
>>> xml.etree.ElementTree.parse
<function parse at 0x00B135B0>

In Python there also are built-in modules, such as sys, that are written in C, but I don't think you meant to consider those in your question.

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1  
no function_of_love, but much better explanation ;). <3 –  OBu May 29 at 14:33

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