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I'm running across a very annoying problem regarding transitive const in D.

I have the code below:

struct Slice(T)
{
    T items;
    size_t start, length, stride;

    this(T items, size_t start = 0, size_t length = size_t.max, size_t stride=1)
    {
        if (length == size_t.max)
        { length = 1 + (items.length - start - 1) / stride; }

        this.items = items;
        this.start = start;
        this.length = length;
        this.stride = stride;
    }

    Slice!(T) opSlice(size_t a, size_t b)
    {
        // Everything is fine here
        return Slice!(T)(items, start + a * stride, b - a, stride);
    }

    const(Slice!(T)) opSlice(size_t a, size_t b) const
    {
        // ERROR!  'items' is const(T), not T.
        return const(Slice!(T))(items, start + a * stride, b - a, stride);
    }
}

The trouble I'm running to is that, pretty much, the data types const(Slice!int) and Slice!const(int) and const(Slice!const(int)) are just... weird.

How do I overload opSlice above, to return a constant copy of the current slice which can subsequently be used like the original slice?

In other words, let's say I have:

void test(in Slice!(int[]) some_slice)
{
    //...
}

void main()
{
    auto my_slice = Slice!(int[])();
    const my_const_slice = my_slice;
    test(my_slice); // succeeds
    test(my_const_slice); //succeeds
    test(my_const_slice[0 .. 1]); // fails
}

The code above doesn't work. What is the best way of making it work? (I could of course always templatize test(), but then all the slice variations -- const(Slice!(Slice!const(int[]))) and such -- would grow exponentially, and confusingly so.)

Edit:

Is there a solution that works for structs and classes?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

inout also works if Slice is a class:

class Slice(T)
{
    T items;
    size_t start, length, stride;
    this(){}
    inout this(inout T items, size_t start = 0, size_t length = size_t.max, size_t stride=1)
    {
        if (length == size_t.max)
            { length = 1 + (items.length - start - 1) / stride; }

        this.items = items;
        this.start = start;
        this.length = length;
        this.stride = stride;
    }

    inout(Slice!(T)) opSlice(size_t a, size_t b) inout{
        return new inout(Slice!T)(items, start + a * stride, b - a, stride);
    }
}

void test(in Slice!(int[]) some_slice)
{
    //...
}

void main()
{
    auto my_slice = new Slice!(int[])();
    const my_const_slice = my_slice;
    test(my_slice); // succeeds
    test(my_const_slice);//succeeds
    test(my_const_slice[0 .. 1]); // succeeds
}
share|improve this answer
    
the inout(Slice!(T)) opSlice(size_t a, size_t b) inout was pretty obscure, thanks for suggesting it. –  Mehrdad Dec 2 '11 at 15:50

change the constructor to

inout this(inout T items, size_t start = 0, size_t length = size_t.max, size_t stride=1)
{
    if (length == size_t.max)
    { length = 1 + (items.length - start - 1) / stride; }

    this.items = items;
    this.start = start;
    this.length = length;
    this.stride = stride;
}

the inout keyword was made for this, it lets the const-ness/immutability of a parameter propagate to the result

share|improve this answer
    
O___O you can use inout on a constructor?! –  Mehrdad Oct 30 '11 at 23:52
    
@Mehrdad I just tried it before submitting the answer and on my old v2.052 compiler it works, I think it's only for structs though –  ratchet freak Oct 31 '11 at 0:06
    
Whoa, good point. +1 for solving my current problem, but I'd love to know how to do it for classes as well, the next time it comes up. Thanks a lot for the answer! :) –  Mehrdad Oct 31 '11 at 0:10
1  
Do not trust inout prior to dmd 2.056. It's horribly broken prior to that. Now, it may very well work in this case exactly as suggested here, but whether or not inout works in a particular situation prior to 2.056 really doesn't tell you anything. You need to use at least dmd 2.056 if you want to use inout and have it work correctly. –  Jonathan M Davis Oct 31 '11 at 4:39
    
@JonathanMDavis I'm forced to keep using 2.052 because I'm hired to finish a program that I build with dfl and I haven't been able to find a dfl lib that compiles with the current dmd –  ratchet freak Oct 31 '11 at 9:43

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