Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm making a game in C++ where is a tank that can moves on a stage. The tank has an angle (float, in degrees, and i'm supposing the tank is at 0º when his cannon points to the right), a speed (float), and there is a time constant called "deltaT" (float).

When the player moves the tank forward, I use trigonometry and the physic equation of position in function of time (I mean X(t), i don't know how it says in english) in order to calculate the new tank's coordinates in the stage.

This is my problem: due to the passage from float to int, the values closest to zero are not taken into account. So, at certain angles, the tank appears rotated, but moves in a different direction.

This is what my code does:

1 - first, I separate the speed in its components X and Y, by using the angle in wich the tank is moving:

    float speedX = this->speed * cos(this->angle);
    float speedY = this->speed * sin(this->angle);

2 - then use the equation I mentioned above to get the new coordinates:

    this->x = (int) ceil(this->x + (speedX * deltaT));
    this->y = (int) ceil(this->y - (speedY * deltaT));

The problem begins at the first step: at certain angles, the value of the cos or the sin is very close to zero. So, when I multiply it for speed to obtain, say, speedX, I still got a very low number, and then when I multiply it for deltaT it is still too low, and finally when apply the ceil, that amount is totally lost.

For example, at 94º, with deltaT = 1.5, and speed = 2, and assuming initial value of X is 400, we have:

speedX = -0.1395...
this->x = 400 //it must be 399.86..., but stays in 400 due to the ceiling

So, in my game the tank appears rotated, but moves straight forward. Also, sometimes it moves well backwards but wrong forward, and viceversa.

¿How can I do to make the direction of the tank more accurate? To raise the speed or the value of deltaT are not options since it's about a tank, not a formula 1 :P

share|improve this question
3  
+1: good work explaining your question and providing minimal relevant code. –  ObscureRobot Oct 31 '11 at 2:02
1  
Storing angles as degrees is rarely useful. C++ natively works in radians. You'll end up converting back and forth. The one exception where you wouldn't use radians is when you have an array of sprites, one for each rotation of the tank. In that case, it can be useful to use the array index instead. But nobody would make 360 sprites; 128 (4x32) would be far more common. –  MSalters Oct 31 '11 at 11:14
    
@MSalters Yes, I reallized about the radians too late. But actually, the code that I've posted its a little bit simplified: I don't use the sin and cos functions from math library, but I have tabulated the values of the cos and sin of certain angles, in order to avoid calculate them in runtime. Also, for the rotated images, I don't have 128 sprites, but I have just one, and use the function "rotozoomSurface" (in SDL_gfx lib, an add on for SDL), that works with degrees. –  Granjero Oct 31 '11 at 18:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

How can I do to make the direction of the tank more accurate? To raise the speed or the value of deltaT are not options since it's about a tank, not a formula 1 :P

You should store your position values as floats, even though they are ultimately used as ints for on-screen positioning. That way, you won't lose the non-integer portion of your position. Just cast to int right at the end when you do your drawing.

share|improve this answer
1  
Oh, thanks so much! I've just made the changes in the code and it works! I can't beleive it was so simple –  Granjero Oct 31 '11 at 3:18

Keep the location of the tank in floats all the time. Alternatively, only let the tank rotate in increments of 45 degrees. Decide on whether your game will use approximate positions and headings or exact ones and stick to that decision all the way through.

share|improve this answer
    
Alternatively, only let the tank rotate in increments of 45 degrees. Yes, I've tried that before, but the tank rotated too fast and in a not very fluid way. –  Granjero Oct 31 '11 at 3:24

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.