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Before actually asking anything, I'll go ahead and say this is a theoretical question; however, it might be implemented on a website later on.

Anyway, I have a variable, any variable. Let's say it's a and its scope is global. Now, for a specific function, I want to set that variable's value to something other than it's global value, but based on it, and without changing its value globally. For example:

a = {something: "Safe", other: "Foo"}
function hello(){
  var a = a.other; // Foo
  a.something; // Undefined
}
a.something; // Safe
a.other; // Foo

The issue with the above code is that when I define var a in the function, it will have already cleared the value of the global a locally before setting it; in other words, it would return something like Can't access property [other] of undefined [a].

Again, a should still be a (so using another variable name is not an option, or at least not the ideal one). In fact, the global a should not be accessible from the function hello.

Edit: window will also be overwritten with null, regarding Milan Jaric's answer.

Thanks in advance!

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3 Answers 3

Let's say it's a and its scope is global.

You mean "a is a global variable".

... for a specific function, I want to set that variable's value to something other than it's global value, but based on it, and without changing its value globally.

Impossible. You can create a variable with the same name that is on a scope chain, however you can't conditionally create properties of variable objects (i.e. the objects used for identifier resolution on the scope chain). You can only declare local varaibles, which means they exist before any code is run and so can't be conditional, or you can assign directly to an undeclared identifier at which point it becomes a global variable.

[snipped code]

The issue with the above code is that when I define var a in the function, it will have already cleared the value of the global a locally before setting it;

The code doesn't in any way "clear" the value of a. It creates a local variable a so that the identifier a will resolve to that variable, not to the global a. To differentiate betweent the two, you can access the global a as a property of the global object:

var a = 'whatever';
var myFunction = (function(global) {
  return function() {
    var a;    // local a
    global.a; // global a
  }
}(this));

Again, a should still be a (so using another variable name is not an option, or at least not the ideal one). In fact, the global a should not be accessible from the function hello.

Impossible, though it might be almost possible in ES5 strict mode provided the code attempting to access the global a is inside another function and can't get a reference to the global object.

But I don't think you can guarantee that.

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Every global can be accessed using window object, with a little changing your code here is example

a = {something: "Safe", other: "Foo"}
function hello(){
  var a = window.a.other; // Foo
  console.log(window.a.something); // Safe
}
a.something; // Safe
a.other; // Foo

hello();

or

a = {something: "Safe", other: "Foo"}
function hello(){
  var a = this.a.other; // Foo
  delete a;
  console.log(this.a.something); // Safe
}
a.something; // Safe
a.other; // Foo

hello();
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Ok, I'm gonna make the game more interesting. Let's say..let's just say that I did this inside the function: var a = window.a.other,window=null. (I cannot allow window to be accessed either...) Any workarounds there? –  JCOC611 Oct 31 '11 at 2:32
    
:) thinking ... –  Milan Jaric Oct 31 '11 at 2:37
    
there is this instance also which could be used, but I see you have changed function signature in your answer, nice thinking :) –  Milan Jaric Oct 31 '11 at 2:45
up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is what I was looking for...now, before you think I had the answer before I asked, I didn't, I was only able to reach a tangible solution based on Milan Jaric's answer (thanks btw).

a = {something: "Safe", other: "Foo"}
function hello(b){
  var window = null;
  var a = b; // a.other;
  a.something; // Undefined
}
a.something // Safe
a.other // Foo

hello(a.other)

(I never really said what could or couldn't go outside the function).

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That is not what I understood you to be asking in the original question. What you are doing is passing a reference to the object assigned to a.other, you were asking how to prevent access to the global a but still reference its properties. –  RobG Oct 31 '11 at 2:48
    
@RobG: It's pretty much the same when you look at this code, and this code alone. I only need to access one property, and there, I accessed it; also, access to other a properties/methods is prevented. Besides, there really is no other way. Things aren't impossible. –  JCOC611 Oct 31 '11 at 3:13
    
Access to other a properties isn't prevented at all, though discovering that the object referenced by a.b is actually referenced by a.b requires a few guesses that aren't that hard given a few assumptions (in other words, security by obscurity isn't a sound policy). –  RobG Oct 31 '11 at 5:27
    
@RobG: If the use of the variables window, parent, and this are prevented, then isn't it "impossible" (or at least very hard) to access the global a, when a local a has been set? In other words, how can this code be broken? –  JCOC611 Oct 31 '11 at 18:58
    
If a is a global variable and a.b references an object, and a.b is passed to a function, and that function takes a guess about a.b it can iterate over the properties of global variables until it finds a match, at which point it knows of a and all its properties. It is very easy to get a reference to the global object in non-strict mode, it's harder (and can be prevented) in strict mode, but strict mode isn't viable on the general web anyway. –  RobG Nov 1 '11 at 0:52

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