Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am still fighting my battle against my low IQ :D This is the usual infamous cycle with closures:

function r(){
  var a = [];
  var i;

  for(i=0;i<10;i++){
    a[i]=(function(x){
      return function(){return x;}
    })(i);
  return a;
}

This is quite clear to me now. In order to understand closures better, I played with the code and came up with:

function r(){
  var a = [];
  var i;
  for(i=0;i<10;i++){
    a[i] = (function(){
      var x=i;
      return function(){return x;}
    })();
  }

  return a;
}

Is my code fully equivalent?

Merc.

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Is my code fully equivalent?

Yes.

I find it slightly easier to read the second way, because it saves having to look to the end of the immediately-executed function to find out what's passed in as a parameter (not that that's a big problem with short functions like this), but the first way is more compact and probably more common so...

share|improve this answer

I guess you didn't try them, the first one doesn't even work! Use firebug to test your code. Here is a version of the first example which actually doesn't give errors:

function r() {
    var a = [];
    var i;

    for (i=0; i<10; i++) {
        a[i] = (function (x) {
            return function () { 
                return x; 
            }
        })(i);
    }
    return a;
}

So, after adding the missing closing brace, they are equivalent, they build an array of functions that return the numbers from 0 to 9, they don't build an array of numbers from 0 to 9. So for example, calling r()[5](); returns 5 (is the sixth element of the array).

share|improve this answer
2  
It was probably just a typo... – Felix Kling Oct 31 '11 at 7:52
    
+1 "Also the second one is broken, so yes, they are equivalent, they both don't work." lol'ed so hard. – helpermethod Oct 31 '11 at 7:53
    
@OliverWeiler yes it was a joke, but I was wrong, so quickly edited to fix my mistake. – stivlo Oct 31 '11 at 7:58

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.