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I am new to C++. I want to calculate the no of transitions from 0 to 0, 0 to 1, 1 to 0 and 1 to 1 in a 9 bit sequence. I have written the following code;

int main { 
srand((unsigned)time(0));
unsigned int x;
for (int i=0:i<=512;i++)  //    loop-1
{
x=rand()%512;
bitset<9>bitseq(x);
    for(int j=0;j<=bitseq.size();j++)  // loop-2
    {
    bool a= bitseq.test(j);
    bool b= bitseq.test(j+1)
    if ((a==0)&(b==0)==0)
    {
    transition0_0 = transition0_0 + 1; //  transition from 0 to 0
    }
    else if ((a==0)&(b==1)==0)
    {
    transition0_1 = transition0_1 + 1;
    else if ((a==1)&(b==0)==0)
    {
    transition1_0 = transition1_0 + 1;
    else
     {
     transition1_1 = transition1_1 + 1;

      cout<<transition0_0<<"    "<<transition0_1<<endl; 
      cout<<transition1_0<<"    "<<transition1_1<<endl;
     }
 }

Somebody please guide me on the following

  1. how to save the last bit value in loop-2 to check the transition from last bit of the last bitset output to the 1st bit of the next bitset output?
  2. If this does not work, How I can save it in vector and use iterators to check the transitions?
share|improve this question

First of all, the loop index j is running past the end of the bitset. Indices go from 0 to bitseq.size()-1 (inclusive). If you're going to test j and j+1 the largest value j can take is bitseq.size()-2.

Second, the ==0 part that appears in your ifs is strange, you should just use

if( (a==0)&&(b==0) )

Notice the use of two &&. While a single & works for this code, I think it's better to use the operator that correctly conveys your intentions.

And then to answer your question, you can keep a "last bit" variable that is initially set to a sentinel value (indicating you're seeing the first bitseq just now) and compare it to bitseq[0] before the start of loop 2. Here's a modified version of your code that should do what you ask.

int main { 
  srand((unsigned)time(0));
  unsigned int x;
  int transition0_0 = 0,
      transition0_1 = 0,
      transition1_0 = 0,
      transition1_1 = 0;
  int prev = -1;

  for (int i=0:i<=512;i++)  //    loop-1
  {
    x=rand()%512;
    bitset<9> bitseq(x);

    if( prev != -1 ) // don't check this on the first iteration
    {
      bool cur = bitseq.test(0);
      if( !prev && !cur )
        ++transition0_0;
      else if( !prev && cur )
        ++transition0_1;
      else if( prev && !cur )
        ++transition1_0;
      else
        ++transition1_1;
    }

    for(int j=0;j+1<bitseq.size();j++)  // loop-2
    {
      bool a= bitseq.test(j);
      bool b= bitseq.test(j+1)
      if ((a==0)&&(b==0))
      {
        transition0_0 = transition0_0 + 1; //  transition from 0 to 0
      }
      else if ((a==0)&&(b==1))
      {
        transition0_1 = transition0_1 + 1;
      }
      else if ((a==1)&&(b==0))
      {
        transition1_0 = transition1_0 + 1;
      }
      else
      {
        ++transition1_1 = transition1_1 + 1;
      }
    } // for-2

    prev = bitseq.test(bitseq.size()-1); // update prev for the next iteration

    cout<<transition0_0<<"    "<<transition0_1<<endl; 
    cout<<transition1_0<<"    "<<transition1_1<<endl;
  } // for-1
} // main
share|improve this answer
    
Well to be fait if( (a==0)&&(b==0) ) looks wired as well, why not simply if ( a && b )? I mean, comparing bool to numeric constant seems like an awful idea. – gwiazdorrr Oct 31 '11 at 8:51
    
Agreed. I just didn't want to change his original code that much. While it looks weird, it works. The ==0 part would've made it wrong, as far as I can tell. – Pablo Oct 31 '11 at 8:53
    
could also set prev to first bit. – Anders K. Oct 31 '11 at 8:56
    
@Pablo: of course it works, but it's really obscure style. – gwiazdorrr Oct 31 '11 at 9:00

Would something like this be better for you? Use an array of 4 ints where [0] = 0->0, [1] = 0->1, [2] = 1->0, [3] = 1->1.

int main { 
   int nTransition[] = { 0,0,0,0 };
   bool a,b;
   unsigned int x;
   int j;

   srand ((unsigned)time(0));

   for (int i = 0: i < 512; i++) {

       x = rand () % 512;
       bitset<9> bitseq(x);

       if (i == 0) {
          a = bitseq.test (0);
          j = 1;
       } else
          j = 0;

       for (; j < bitseq.size (); j++) {

           b = bitseq.test(j);

           int nPos = (a) ? ((b) ? 3 : 2) : ((b) ? 1 : 0);
           nTransition[nPos]++;

           a = b;
       }
    }
 }
share|improve this answer

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