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I am currently thinking of how to implement an authentication for a web application with a NoSQL solution. The problem I encounter hereby is that in most of the NoSQL solutions (e.g. Cassandra, MongoDB) have probably delayed writes. For example we write on node A but it is not guaranteed that the write is appearing on node B at the same time. This is logical with the approaches behind the NoSQL solutions.

Now one idea would be that you do no secondary reads (so everything goes over a master). This would probably work in MongoDB (where you actually have a master) but not in Cassandra (where all nodes are equal). But our application runs at several independent points all over the world, so we need multi master capability.

At the moment I am not aware of a solution with Cassandra where I could update data and be sure that subsequent reads (to all of the nodes) do have the change. So how could one build an authentication on top of those NoSQL solutions where the authentication request (read) could appear on several nodes in parallel?

Thanks for your help!

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1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

With respects to Apache Cassandra:

The ConsistencyLevel is an enum that controls both read and write behavior based on in your schema definition. The different consistency levels have different meanings, depending on if you're doing a write or read operation. Note that if W + R > ReplicationFactor, where W is the number of nodes to block for on write, and R the number to block for on reads, you will have strongly consistent behavior; that is, readers will always see the most recent write. Of these, the most interesting is to do QUORUM reads and writes, which gives you consistency while still allowing availability in the face of node failures up to half of ReplicationFactor. Of course if latency is more important than consistency then you can use lower values for either or both.

This is managed on the application side. To your question specifically, it comes down to how you design your Cassandra implementation, replication factor across the Cassandra nodes and how your application behaves on read/writes.

Write

  • ANY: Ensure that the write has been written to at least 1 node, including HintedHandoff recipients.
  • ONE: Ensure that the write has been written to at least 1 replica's commit log and memory table before responding to the client.
  • QUORUM: Ensure that the write has been written to N / 2 + 1 replicas before responding to the client.
  • LOCAL_QUORUM: Ensure that the write has been written to / 2 + 1 nodes, within the local datacenter (requires NetworkTopologyStrategy)
  • EACH_QUORUM: Ensure that the write has been written to / 2 + 1 nodes in each datacenter (requires NetworkTopologyStrategy)
  • ALL: Ensure that the write is written to all N replicas before responding to the client. Any unresponsive replicas will fail the operation.

Read

  • ANY: Not supported. You probably want ONE instead.
  • ONE: Will return the record returned by the first replica to respond. A consistency check is always done in a background thread to fix any consistency issues when ConsistencyLevel.ONE is used. This means subsequent calls will have correct data even if the initial read gets an older value. (This is called ReadRepair)
  • QUORUM: Will query all replicas and return the record with the most recent timestamp once it has at least a majority of replicas (N / 2 + 1) reported. Again, the remaining replicas will be checked in the background.
  • LOCAL_QUORUM: Returns the record with the most recent timestamp once a majority of replicas within the local datacenter have replied.
  • EACH_QUORUM: Returns the record with the most recent timestamp once a majority of replicas within each datacenter have replied.
  • ALL: Will query all replicas and return the record with the most recent timestamp once all replicas have replied. Any unresponsive replicas will fail the operation.
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Ok that would be an approach to cover the requirement. Now have to see how to handle this per datacenter so that the data stays primarly at the preffered data center. –  rit Oct 31 '11 at 13:04
    
Read into the NetworkTopologyStrategy for Cassandra. datastax.com/docs/0.7/operations/clustering .. that'll sort you out. –  sdolgy Oct 31 '11 at 13:17
    
Updated doc link: datastax.com/dev/blog/… –  jbellis Nov 1 '11 at 14:40

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