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Using XStream lib,my .xml structure should be following:

<record>value1</record>
         ...
<record>valueN</record>
<tailRecord>recordsCount</tailRecord>

tailRecord is the last and single tag for whole .xml file.
It should hold number of record,so should be calculable.

Is it possible to provide calculable tag with XStream?
Generic Use Case is following:
when user action is performed,record should be added, and tailRecord value should be updated.

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1  
Could you publish the relevant piece of code, that serializes <record> from your output? I believe that is a collection, and what you need is to add tailRecord property to your Java bean, that holds the number of elements in your collection. –  dma_k Nov 5 '11 at 23:14
    
command $ xmlstarlet sel -t -v 'sum(//record)' file.xml print sum of records –  kev Nov 8 '11 at 12:44

1 Answer 1

You will need to make a minor adjustment to your schema. Instead of:

<record>value1</record>
<record>value2</record>
...
<record>valueN</record>
<tailRecord>recordsCount</tailRecord>

You will need:

<records>
    <record>value1</record>
    <record>value2</record>
    ...
    <record>valueN</record>
</records>
<tailRecord>recordsCount</tailRecord>

...then, if your object looks something like this:

public class RecordObject
{
    private List<Integer> records;

    // ... a bunch of code

    public List<Integer> getRecords()
    {
        return records;
    }

    public int getRecordSize()
    {
        return records.size();
    }
}

Then two lines of XStream is all you need:

XStream xstream = new XStream();
RecordObject recordObject = (RecordObject)xstream.fromXML("your-xml-example-as-a-string");

XStream will (by default) detect that <record>value1</record> is a node of type int (or String, or any other obvious primitive type). It will then bundle multiple <record> objects into a java.utils.collections.List of the appropriate autoboxed type.

You will then be able to use your RecordObject as you normally would:

System.out.println("There were " recordObject.getRecordCount() + " records found.");

Note: You may have an issue with the tailRecord XML element. I would recommend deleting it or configuring XStream to ignore it altogether with the @XStreamOmitField annotation like this example demonstrates.

My argument for this is that proper OOD would never allow an object to contain a list of things, and to have a separate property representing the size of the list (recordCount). You would just design an object (like my example above) to have a list of those things and have - at most - a convenience method like getRecordCount() to return the size of the list at runtime.

I understand that for other reasons (interfacing with legacy systems, etc.) you may need that tailRecord element in there, but by the team it goes through XStream and becomes a bona fide Java object, there's just no good use for it in Java Land.

And, if for some reason I didn't understand your question and this isn't the answer you're looking for, my last suggestion would be to check out Smooks. Smooks implements the Visitor interface and allows you to have custom processing performed every time an XML node is visited by its internal SAXParser. You could configure it to run tallying method whenever it reaches a tailRecord and to sum up the counts however you want it to. Best of luck to you!

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@sergionni I would appreciate feedback as to whether or not this answer was helpful to you! If not I can go back to the drawing boards. –  IAmYourFaja Nov 9 '11 at 21:05

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