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I need to translate some c++ into java, but I have I few issues.

How to I have to deal with pointers when they are declared as arguments in the Method?

static void test( double *output){}

Also what is and how can I replace struct?

struct test { int t;
int arg;
float *pva;
double *array;
}

And then in the code they use:

double test(struct test *test)
{}

Oh and a last one.. this is also inside struct test, what means :

test->arg
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Looks like C to me. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Oct 31 '11 at 9:39

4 Answers 4

static void test( double *output){}

This needs more context, it can mean a pointer to a double or an array of doubles.

struct test { int t;
int arg;
float *pva;
double *array;
}

A struct is a class with default public access level. You can replace it with a class with public members.

test->arg

This accesses the arg member in test.

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You do not have pointers in Java, only references and only for objects (not for primitive types). References are like pointers, but you use the '.' notation instead of '*' or '->'. Also, you do not need to delete objects in Java, you just stop using them and eventually the garbage collector with destroy them.

Answering your points above, from bottom to top: If test is a pointer to a struct or class in C++, and arg is a member variable of test, then

test->arg

is used to access the member through the pointer. This would map to

test.arg

in Java, if arg is a public member variable of the test object.

I would translate the following:

struct test
{
    int t;
    int arg;
    float *pva;
    double *array;
}

...

double test(struct test *test)
{}

to

public class Test
{
    public int t;

    public int arg;

    float [] pva;

    double [] array;
}

...

public static double test(Test test)
{}

For the first case, i.e. the function

static void test( double *output){}

you cannot pass a pointer to double and modify the double in Java. You have to return a double. If you need the double also as an input parameter, you specify it as a normal parameter that is passed by value:

static double test(double output)
{}

I hope this helps.

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Or you could do it the c++ way, passing a double[] of size 1 and modifying its contents (useful when the method already has another return type) –  mauhiz Sep 17 '13 at 15:17

In the simple cases you can replace float * and double * with float [] and double [] However C++ allows you to do all sorts of unpleasant things which are difficult to translate into Java because it is not allowed in Java.

You can replace a struct with a class

If you want to understand basic C++ syntax, I suggest you read a guide on how to program in C++.

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... 'If you want to understand basic C++ syntax, I suggest you read a guide on how to program in C++' ... mmm –  sehe Oct 31 '11 at 9:33
    
We can't be helping him translate line by line as C++ has many levels of complexity Java doesn't have. He has be able able to read basic C++ code. –  Peter Lawrey Oct 31 '11 at 9:36
    
void test(double * output) can relate to either passing an array of double or passing a pointer to a single double where the output is written. The choice of name for the attribute seems to indicate the latter. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Oct 31 '11 at 12:00
    
If you have a method with returns one double I would expect to be written as double test(). –  Peter Lawrey Oct 31 '11 at 12:51

(1) static void test( double *output){}

Here double* can be replaced with a Double[] (assume that you do a new Double[]) and the method can be put inside a class.

class testMethod {
  public static void test (Double []output) { }
}

(2) how can I replace struct? It can be replaced with a class.

class test {
public int t;
public int arg;
public Float []pva;
public Double []array;
}

(3) double test(struct test *test) {} It can be,

double test (test t) {}

(4) test->arg

Java doesn't have pointers (though it's implemented with reference); so above statement will be test.arg

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Why would us use Float[] or Double[] instead of float[] or double[]? –  Peter Lawrey Oct 31 '11 at 9:37
    
I think you want double instead of Double. Similarly for Float. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Oct 31 '11 at 9:38
    
@PeterLawrey, I assumed that the OP may want to do dynamic allocation in C++ (i.e. new double[100]). Which would be more suitable as new Double[100], in Java. –  iammilind Oct 31 '11 at 9:40
    
In Java you can use new double[100] (array of primitive type double) or new Double[100] (array of Double objects). I do not see the advantage of using the second possibility, though. –  Giorgio Oct 31 '11 at 9:46
    
The first case can relate to either passing an array of double or passing a pointer to a single double where the output is written. The choice of name for the attribute seems to indicate the latter. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Oct 31 '11 at 12:00

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