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I have 2 Hibernate classes in a Spring-driven Application like these:

@Entity
public class Image {

@Id
@GeneratedValue(strategy = GenerationType.IDENTITY)
private long id;

@ManyToMany(mappedBy = "picture", fetch = FetchType.LAZY)
private Set<InspectionObjectDetail> inspectionObjectDetails = new HashSet<InspectionObjectDetail>();

@Override
public int hashCode() {
    // Eclipse generated hashCode()
}

@Override
public boolean equals(Object obj) {
    // Eclipse generated equals()
 }
}

and

@Entity
public class InspectionObjectDetail {

@Id
@GeneratedValue(strategy = GenerationType.IDENTITY)
private long id;


@ManyToMany (fetch = FetchType.LAZY)
@JoinTable(
name = "MXInspectionObjectDetail_picture",
joinColumns = {@JoinColumn(name = "INSPECTIONOBJECTDETAIL_ID")},
inverseJoinColumns = {@JoinColumn(name = "PICTURE_ID")}
)
@Where(clause = "active = true")
private Set<UOCImage> picture = new HashSet<UOCImage>();
@Override
public int hashCode() {
    // Eclipse generated hashCode()
}

@Override
public boolean equals(Object obj) {
    // Eclipse generated equals()
 }
}

I can add elements to this relation and query them just fine, but a jUnit test where I try to remove the relation without actually deleting one of these objects fails.

What I'm currently doing is unlinking each object from the other one in a transactional context:

// Junit Test

@Test
public void deleteInspectionObjectDetailImage() {
    InspectionObjectDetail inspectionObjectDetail = new InspectionObjectDetail();
    dao.save(inspectionObjectDetail);
    someClass.saveInspectionObjectDetailImage(controlObject.getId());
            //passes
    assertTrue(inspectionObjectDetail.getPictures().size() == 1);
    UOCImage image = inspectionObjectDetail.getPictures().iterator().next();
    someClass.deleteImage(image);
    Set<UOCImage> images = inspectionObjectDetail.getPictures();
            //fails
    assertTrue(images.size() == 0);
}

// BO Class

@Transactional
@Component
public class SomeClass() {
    public void delteImage(Image image) {
        if(image!= null) {
        image.setActive(false);
        while(image.getInspectionObjectDetails().iterator().hasNext()) {
             InspectionObjectDetail inspectionObjectDetail = image.getInspectionObjectDetails().iterator().next();
             inspectionObjectDetail.getPictures().remove(image);
             image.getInspectionObjectDetails().remove(inspectionObjectDetail);

                }
        }
        sessionFactory.getCurrentSession().flush();
     }

}

The Hibernate Log tells me that it did an insert to the relationship to the relationship is executed correctly, my remove statements however do not appear (Even after the session.flush() ). If possible I'd like to keep the lazy fetching the way it is, because I expect a lot of reads on the either table that won't need the according other class loaded.

Has someone any pointers for me?

UPDATE

regarding @Thor84no 's suggestion, I tried to remove each association by removing it through the iterator.remove() function, so my BO Object now looks like this:

// BO Class

@Transactional
@Component
public class SomeClass() {
    public void delteImage(Image image) {
        if(image!= null) {
        image.setActive(false);
        Iterator<InspectionObjectDetail> inspectionObjectDetailsIterator = image.getInspectionObjectDetails().iterator();
        while (inspectionObjectDetailsIterator.hasNext()) {
            InspectionObjectDetail inspectionObjectDetail = inspectionObjectDetailsIterator.next();
            Iterator<UOCImage> imageIterator = inspectionObjectDetail.getPictures().iterator();
            while (imageIterator.hasNext()) {
                if (imageIterator.next() == image) {
                    imageIterator.remove();
                }
            }
            inspectionObjectDetailsIterator.remove();
        }
    }
    sessionFactory.getCurrentSession().flush();
}

}

In my (edited) Junittest:

    // ...
    someClass.deleteImage(image.getId());
    assertTrue(image.getInspectionObjectDetails().size() == 0);
    assertTrue(inspectionObjectDetail.getPictures().size() == 0);

The first assertion succeeds, but the second one fails, so the bidirectional association between

Image <--> InspectionObjectDetail was only reduced to
Image <-- InspectionObjectDetail

share|improve this question
    
Is someMethodToDelete the method called as deleteImage in deleteInspectionObjectDetailImage, I assume not directly, so how are they related? Why are you creating and populating a new ArrayList in this method rather than using the iterator on the existing List you want to remove things from? What's controlObject and how is it populated? –  Thor84no Oct 31 '11 at 11:07
    
@Thor84no , thanks for the feedback - While trying to keep the example short and understandable I was messing it up - the (formerly named) someMethodToDelete Method is the deleteImage method. Also, thanks for the pointer on the duplicate ArrayList, I was using a copy to avoid a concurrentModificationException, but that was the wrong approach. I refactored it to make use of the Iterator (please see the edit), but the original problem is still the same –  Christian Uhl Oct 31 '11 at 12:12
    
Ok. That clarifies it a little. Your current code however would likely cause the ConcurrentModificationException you're referring to. When using an Iterator store it as a variable outside the while (or use a for loop) and use the remove() method on the iterator itself to remove the last object returned from using next(). Other than that I can't see why it wouldn't be removed until I've had an opportunity to test it. –  Thor84no Oct 31 '11 at 12:29
    
Your deleteImage call in deleteInspectionObjectDetailImage passes in image.getId(), but your deleteImage method in SomeClass takes the image as a parameter. How are you getting the Image instance? –  Thor84no Oct 31 '11 at 14:37
    
Ouch, that was another mistake in the simple example, not in the real code. Sorry for the unneccessary complication, I'm passing the Image instance that is recieved in SomeClass. –  Christian Uhl Oct 31 '11 at 14:46

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

For anyone with a similar problem, the real issue was that the picture Set in inspectionObjectDetail still had the image in it after the deleteImage call. In order to most easily test whether this is the case you could either use a debugger to step through the code and check whether the Set changes or print it out before and after calling the remove method.

If you find that the object is not removed, make sure you check the hashCode() and equals() methods of the object you are removing from the Set. The Set may only use hashCode(), but do remember that hashCode() and equals() are supposed to be consistent and there's no guarantee they ignore equals().

share|improve this answer
while(image.getInspectionObjectDetails().iterator().hasNext()) {
    InspectionObjectDetail inspectionObjectDetail = image.getInspectionObjectDetails().iterator().next();
    inspectionObjectDetail.getPictures().remove(image);
    image.getInspectionObjectDetails().remove(inspectionObjectDetail);
}

Did you know that calling iterator() on a list creates a new Iterator each time it is called? I guess your problem is (or at least on of them) that you're in a infinite loop here. The while will always be true as long as image.getInspectionObjectDetails() has at least 1 element and also image.getInspectionObjectDetails().iterator().next() will always return the same (the first) element.

Try something like this:

Iterator<InspectionObjectDetail> it = image.getInspectionObjectDetails().iterator();
while (it.hasNext()
    InspectionObjectDetail detail = it.next();
    detail.getPictures().remove(image);
    it.remove();
}

UPDATE:

if (imageIterator.next() == image)

Never compare objects like this in java; use equals instead and implement equals/hashCode on your entity. == will simply check if both operands have the same reference so this might yield false although logically it is the same entity (same business key): http://leepoint.net/notes-java/data/expressions/22compareobjects.html

Afterwards you can rewrite:

Iterator<UOCImage> imageIterator = inspectionObjectDetail.getPictures().iterator();
            while (imageIterator.hasNext()) {
                if (imageIterator.next() == image) {
                    imageIterator.remove();
                }
            }

as:

inspectionObjectDetail.getPictures().remove(image);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @TheStijn, you're right about the iterator! I changed that, however the problem stays the same (at least for one side of the realtion, the other one is removed as intendet) - I've updated my question accordingly –  Christian Uhl Oct 31 '11 at 14:04
    
You are right, that's a horrible bad practice I should get rid of! Thansk for the refactoring tip, that is way more "clean code" than my attempt, I refactored it accordingly –  Christian Uhl Oct 31 '11 at 17:16

The thumb rule in deleting the association is to clear the Collections in involved Java objects and then save the objects.

Thus, if Class A has a collection of Class B, and Class B has a collection of Class A (A many-to-many relation case), then simply clear the collection of

  • Class B in Class A
  • Class A in Class B

and save Class A and Class B. The relation would be deleted but the objects would stay.

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer

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