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Hi I start learn NHibernate and now I am trying create own repository class for NHibernate.

I found many articles about this thema. I chose this tutorial: http://dotnetslackers.com/Community/blogs/antrad/archive/2008/10/25/about-repository-pattern-and-nhibernate.aspx

I am little confuse how handle with transaction in repository.

I have repository interface:

public interface IRepository<T> where T : class
{
    void Commit();
    void RollBack();
    void BeginTransaction();
    //...
}

My question is why is good begin transaction in constructor class of repository.

This part of code is from blog on top.

public class NHibRepository<T> :IRepository<T> 
    where T : class
{
    #region Private fields

    private ISession _session;

    #endregion

    #region Constructor

    public NHibRepository(ISession session)
    {
        _session = NHibernateSessionManager.Instance.GetSession();

        //why begin transaction where???
        _session.BeginTransaction();
    }

    #endregion


    #region Trans

    public void Commit()
    {
        if (session.Transaction.IsActive)
        {
            session.Transaction.Commit();
        }
    }

    public void Rollback()
    {
        if (session.Transaction.IsActive)
        {
            session.Transaction.Rollback();
            session.Clear();
        }
    }

    public void BeginTransaction()
    {
        Rollback();
        session.BeginTransaction();
    }

    #endregion


}

I update this repository and now I use this solution:

public class NHibRepository<T> :IRepository<T> 
        where T : class
    {
        #region Private fields

        private ISession _session;

        #endregion

        #region Constructor

        public NHibRepository(ISession session)
        {
            _session = session;
        }

        #endregion


        #region Trans

        public void Commit()
        {
            using (var trans=_session.BeginTransaction())
            {
                trans.Commit();
            }
        }

        public void RollBack()
        {
            using (var trans = _session.BeginTransaction())
            {
                trans.Rollback();
            }
        }

        public void BeginTransaction()
        {
            throw new NotImplementedException();
        }

        #endregion


    }

My first question is which solution is better and why? or what is correct why?


And my second question is how open session for repository class, now I use this helper class:

  public class NHibeHelper
    {
        private static ISessionFactory _sessionFactory;

        private static ISessionFactory SessionFactory
        {
            get
            {
                if (_sessionFactory == null)
                    InitializeSessionFactory();

                return _sessionFactory;
            }
        }

        private static void InitializeSessionFactory()
        {

            _sessionFactory = Fluently.Configure()
                .Database(MsSqlConfiguration.MsSql2008
                              .ConnectionString(
                                   @"Server=Zues\SQLEXPRESS;Database=TEST;Trusted_Connection=True;")
                                  )

                .Mappings(m => m.FluentMappings.AddFromAssemblyOf<UserMap>().Conventions.Add(DefaultCascade.All()))


                .ExposeConfiguration(cfg => new SchemaUpdate(cfg).Execute(true, true))

                .BuildSessionFactory();
        }

        public static ISession OpenSession()
        {
            return SessionFactory.OpenSession();
        }
    }

On use like this:

 _userRepo = new NHibRepository<User>(NHibeHelper.OpenSession());
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1 Answer

Looking at the two options you've presented for transaction management, they both actually have issues.

In example 1, the transaction isn't necessarily disposed, and also you're linking the lifetime of the transaction to the lifetime of the repository. This isn't necessarily a bad thing but unless you're using an IoC container or some other method to ensure that the repository is recreated for each database operation, you will only be able to commit once, and subsequent commits will probably fail.

Example 2 will unfortunately not work at all - in Commit/RollBack you are starting a new transaction every time. Especially in the case of RollBack, if this was called from external code while in the context of a transaction, all you will do is start a new nested transaction and then immediately roll it back. Not very useful unfortunately.

My personal solution to your first question is to pull transaction management away from the repository by using the ambient transactions in System.Transactions. This way you still have separation as ambient transactions are provider-agnostic, but also you have more control about what of many repository operations you might be performing will be involved in the transaction, rather than always using the single-transaction-per-operation model. See http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/cc163527.aspx for more info.

As for your second question, I would highly recommend looking into an IoC container like Castle Windsor or Unity. The helper class you have there is far better than rebuilding the session factory and such every time, but by using an IoC container you can very easily ensure the lifetime of your session object is exactly what you want it to be. For instance, in a number of WCF Per-Call services I'm working on, I use Castle Windsor to ensure that the session is created (and injected into the repository) when the WCF operation begins, and is disposed (along with the repository) when it ends.

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