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I was surprised to see an example of a string being initialised to null and then having something appended to it in a production environment. It just smelt wrong.

I was sure it would have thrown a null object exception but this greatly reduced example also works:

string sample = null;
sample += "test";
// sample equals "test"

*Note the original code I found sets a string property to null and appends to it elsewhere so answers involving the compiler optimizing out the null at compile-time are irrelevant.

Can someone explain why this works without error?

Follow-up:

Based on Leppie's answer I used Reflector to see what is inside string.Concat. It is now really obvious why that conversion takes place (no magic at all):

public static string Concat(string str0, string str1)
{
    if (IsNullOrEmpty(str0))
    {
        if (IsNullOrEmpty(str1))
        {
            return Empty;
        }
        return str1;
    }
    if (IsNullOrEmpty(str1))
    {
        return str0;
    }
    int length = str0.Length;
    string dest = FastAllocateString(length + str1.Length);
    FillStringChecked(dest, 0, str0);
    FillStringChecked(dest, length, str1);
    return dest;
}

**Note: the specific implementation I was investigating (in the .Net library by Microsoft) does not convert to empty strings as is suggested by the C# standards and most of the answers, but uses a few tests to shortcut the process. The end result is the same as if it did but there you go :)

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4 Answers 4

up vote 35 down vote accepted

the + operator for strings are just shorthand for string.Concat which simply turns null arguments into empty strings before the concatenation.

Update:

The generalized version of string.Concat:

public static string Concat(params string[] values)
{
    int num = 0;
    if (values == null)
    {
        throw new ArgumentNullException("values");
    }
    string[] array = new string[values.Length];
    for (int i = 0; i < values.Length; i++)
    {
        string text = values[i];
        array[i] = ((text == null) ? string.Empty : text);
        num += array[i].Length;
        if (num < 0)
        {
            throw new OutOfMemoryException();
        }
    }
    return string.ConcatArray(array, num);
}
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+1: Thanks for that. Based on your answer I decompiled String.Concat (added above) and it all makes sense now. Cheers. –  TrueBlueAussie Oct 31 '11 at 12:28
1  
Obviously this is the right answer for the OP, but was it ever true in .NET that "abc" + null == null? Classically, null is a "non-value", and so operations on a generic "null" are inconclusive. I was always taught that "null isn't empty", and by definition this is correct; null != String.Empty, which is why we have String.IsNullOrEmpty(). –  KeithS Oct 31 '11 at 17:15
    
@KeithS, this is simply because the + operator for a string is defined as syntatic sugar to call string.Concat. If you remove the +operator definition on string, you wouldn't be able to use + at all. So its not like addition is defined for everything and the compiler magically figures it out (as some languages do). C# requires an explicit +operator definition to use the operator. –  Andy Oct 31 '11 at 19:22
    
@Andy: That wasn't the answer to the question I asked. The question was, did .NET's string concatenation ever behave differently than it does currently? –  KeithS Oct 31 '11 at 19:23
    
@KeithS: No. It did not. –  leppie Oct 31 '11 at 19:42

it is because

In string concatenation operations, the C# compiler treats a null string the same as an empty string, but it does not convert the value of the original null string.

From How to: Concatenate Multiple Strings (C# Programming Guide)

The binary + operator performs string concatenation when one or both operands are of type string. If an operand of string concatenation is null, an empty string is substituted. Otherwise, any non-string argument is converted to its string representation by invoking the virtual ToString method inherited from type object. If ToString returns null, an empty string is substituted.

From Addition operator

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Where did you get that reference? The "compiler" should have no knowledge of the runtime values. Thanks –  TrueBlueAussie Oct 31 '11 at 12:16
    
Thanks for the update. Typical that Microsoft's explanation actually makes it more confusing! :) –  TrueBlueAussie Oct 31 '11 at 12:30
    
@HiTech Magic The compiler does do concatenation of constant values (string literals and the null literal), replacing the concatenation expression with a string literal of the whole string. It also eliminates null literals from concatenation expressions. –  Random832 Oct 31 '11 at 14:07
    
The example is greatly simplified. The actual situation had the null assignment to a member in a constructor, and the += happens much later, so optimisation is not a factor. Thanks anyway –  TrueBlueAussie Nov 2 '11 at 16:01

Here is what your code gets compiled to

string sample = null;
sample += "test";

is compiled to this IL code:

.entrypoint
  // Code size       16 (0x10)
  .maxstack  2
  .locals init ([0] string sample)
  IL_0000:  nop
  IL_0001:  ldnull
  IL_0002:  stloc.0
  IL_0003:  ldloc.0
  IL_0004:  ldstr      "test"
  IL_0009:  call       string [mscorlib]System.String::Concat(string,
                                                              string)
  IL_000e:  stloc.0
  IL_000f:  ret

And String.Concat takes care of NULL string.

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The relevant citation should be ECMA-334 §14.7.4:

String concatenation:

string operator +(string x, string y);
string operator +(string x, object y);
string operator +(object x, string y);  

The binary + operator performs string concatenation when one or both operands are of type string. If an operand of string concatenation is null, an empty string is substituted. Otherwise, any non-string operand is converted to its string representation by invoking the virtual ToString method inherited from type object. If ToString returns null, an empty string is substituted.

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While that was the aim of the language it appears the MS coders were happy to write their logic based on null-ness of the parameters instead (see the decomp above). I guess they felt it was more optimal. –  TrueBlueAussie Nov 2 '11 at 16:06
    
@HiTech Magic: I believe the implementation matches the specification. Note the text I emphasized: "If an operand [..] is null, an empty string is substituted". Exactly what we see in the behavior and the decompilation. –  Rasmus Faber Nov 2 '11 at 17:41
    
Sorry I must be missreading the decomp, as at no point does it substitute empty strings. The end result is the same as if it did, and I realise I am just being pedantic, but there you go. Thanks –  TrueBlueAussie Nov 3 '11 at 9:16

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