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Multiprocessing launching too many instances of Python VM

I'm trying to use python multiprocess to parallelize web fetching, but I'm finding that the application calling the multiprocessing gets instantiated multiple times, not just the function I want called (which is a problem for me as the caller has some dependencies on a library that is slow to instantiate - losing most of my performance gains from parallelism).

What am I doing wrong or how is this avoided?

my_app.py:

from url_fetcher import url_fetch, parallel_fetch
import my_slow_stuff

my_slow_stuff.py:

if __name__ == '__main__':
    import datetime
    urls = ['http://www.microsoft.com'] * 20
    results = parallel_fetch(urls, fn=url_fetch)
    print([x[:20] for x in results])

class MySlowStuff(object):
    import time
    print('doing slow stuff')
    time.sleep(0)
    print('done slow stuff')

url_fetcher.py:

import multiprocessing
import urllib

def url_fetch(url):
    #return urllib.urlopen(url).read()
    return url

def parallel_fetch(urls, fn):
    PROCESSES = 10
    CHUNK_SIZE = 1
    pool = multiprocessing.Pool(PROCESSES)
    results = pool.imap(fn, urls, CHUNK_SIZE)
    return results

if __name__ == '__main__':
    import datetime
    urls = ['http://www.microsoft.com'] * 20
    results = parallel_fetch(urls, fn=url_fetch)
    print([x[:20] for x in results])

partial output:

$ python my_app.py
doing slow stuff
done slow stuff
doing slow stuff
done slow stuff
doing slow stuff
done slow stuff
doing slow stuff
done slow stuff
doing slow stuff
done slow stuff

...

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marked as duplicate by Piotr Dobrogost, Kev Sep 24 '12 at 23:15

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Are you observing this on Windows? –  Maxim Egorushkin Oct 31 '11 at 12:49
    
yes I am. And indeed, on my Linux server, it does not exhibit that behaviour. –  RuiDC Oct 31 '11 at 13:13

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Python multiprocessing module for Windows behaves slightly differently because Python doesn't implement os.fork() on this platform. In particular:

Safe importing of main module

Make sure that the main module can be safely imported by a new Python interpreter without causing unintended side effects (such a starting a new process).

Here, global class MySlowStuff gets always evaluated by newly started child processes on Windows. To fix that class MySlowStuff should be defined only when __name__ == '__main__'.

See 16.6.3.2. Windows for more details.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, as soon as you mentioned windows, I knew I'd (mis)read that section thinking it was pertaining to the callee. –  RuiDC Oct 31 '11 at 14:18

The multiprocessing module on windows doesn't work the same as in Unix/Linux. On Linux it uses the fork command and all the context is copied/duplciated to the new pocess as it is when forked.

The system call fork does not exsit on windows, and the multiprocessing module has to create a new python process and load all the modules again, this is the reason why on the python lib documetnacion forces you to user the if __name__ == '__main__' trick when using mutiprocessing on windows.

The solution to this case is to use threads instead. This case is a IO bound process and you the advantage os multiprocessing that is avoiding GIL problems does not afect you.

More info in http://docs.python.org/library/multiprocessing.html#windows

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, but although not stated in the question, I have other tasks that I'd like to perform after, such as zlib decompression and xml parsing that lead me to use multiprocess rather than threading. –  RuiDC Oct 31 '11 at 14:20

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