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How can I check to make sure the siblings don't contain the class I am looking for before I start traveling up the DOM with closest()? I could do it with the closest() and siblings() functions but I am wondering if there is a jquery function that already exists that would take care of this.

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4  
Could you provide some html to make your questions clearer? –  Deleteman Oct 31 '11 at 14:03
    
The closest docs say it does return the current element - i.e. the sibling - if appropriate, which sounds like that's what you want. What's wrong with just calling closest()? Does it give you the wrong result? –  Rup Oct 31 '11 at 14:12
1  
The question's not THAT unclear. "make sure the siblings of a given element don't contain..." would've been clearer, but code sample wouldn't help THAT much. –  Greg Pettit Oct 31 '11 at 14:12
    
@Rup Closest docs say : Begins with the current element. Travels up the DOM tree until it finds a match for the supplied selector, The returned jQuery object contains zero or one element –  Tim Joyce Oct 31 '11 at 14:14
    
@Greg Pettit - Thank you. My thoughts too. –  Tim Joyce Oct 31 '11 at 14:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

closest() looks up the DOM, siblings() looks to either side; I don't believe there's any jQuery method that does both. You'll have to start with siblings() (possibly with .andSelf()) and then test the length to see if you need to check closest() instead.

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This is what I was trying to avoid since I thought there was a more elegant way of doing this. But I think your answer is probably right. –  Tim Joyce Oct 31 '11 at 14:23

Add the class as a selector to .siblings(). Then, check whether the size of the selection equals zero.

if($(this).siblings('.aRandomClass').length == 0) {
    // No sibling with class aRandomClass
} else {
    // The length is not zero, so there's a sibling with class aRandomClass
}
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