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im trying to use few threads to make the following:

 List<Thread> threads = new List<Thread>();
        for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++)
            threads.Add(new Thread(CheckTradeOneForOne));

        foreach (Thread t in threads)
            t.Start();
            progressBarTrades.Value = 0;
        count = 0;

while count is defined at class-level,and progressbar is progressbar(winforms^_^).

   private void CheckTradeOneForOne()
    {
        int current;
        while (count < Trades.Count)
        {
            lock (locker)
            {
                current = count;
                count++;
            }
            temppage = HelpClass.GetSourceCodeForTrade(Trades[current], sessid, profilenum);
            //if the trainer has requested anything?
            if (!HelpClass.RequestAnything(temppage))
            {

            }
            lock (locker)
            {
                progressBarTrades.Value = (100 * count) / Trades.Count;
                //buttonAction.Text = count.ToString();
            }
        }
    }

Trades is List(length around 1000).

i want to pass of all the trades and make one httpwebrequest each, therefore i want to use multithreading, the problem is that although i use lock im getting error about the second lock that another thread is using buttonaction\progressbar.

one more thing, is this a proper way to use multithreading? how much threads is ideal to use? and do the lock make sure that no moe then one thread take the same trade string?

tyvm for your help:)

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1  
Use Threadpool (Of-Topic but is highly recommended) –  Burimi Oct 31 '11 at 15:17

4 Answers 4

With windows form the best way to work with the progress bar and threads is BackgroundWorkers in MSDN is a good example.

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You cannot access windows form or wpf controls from a thread that is not the form thread. To do that you should use BeginInvoke or the class SynchronizationContext.

However since you are just updating a progressbar I would suggest you to use a simple timer, if you have a lot of threads, it will be faster.

Instead threads I would also suggest you to use ThreadPool, this will avoid the instantiation of too many threads.

Just as an example I post some code.

private volatile int TradesCount;
private List<...> Trades;

void MyFunction()
{
    List<Thread> threads = new List<Thread>();
    for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++)
        threads.Add(new Thread(CheckTradeOneForOne));

    timer1.Enabled = true;

    progressBarTrades.Value = 0;
    this.TradesCount = 0;

    foreach (Thread t in threads)
        t.Start();
}

void timer1_Tick(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    int count = this.TradesCount;
    if (count >= Trades.Count)
    {
        count = Trades.Count;
        timer1.Enabled = false;
    }

    progressBarTrades.Value = (100 * count) / Trades.Count;
    buttonAction.Text = count.ToString();
}

private void CheckTradeOneForOne()
{
    int current;
    for (;;)
    {
        // This will give you a warning, but you can ignore it with a #pragma, it is allowed to use Interlocked.Increment and volatile fields.
        current = Interlocked.Increment(ref TradesCount) - 1;

        if (current >= Trades.Count)
            break; // We can exit the loop.

        temppage = HelpClass.GetSourceCodeForTrade(Trades[current], sessid, profilenum);

        //if the trainer has requested anything?
        if (!HelpClass.RequestAnything(temppage))
        {
            ...
        }
    }
}

I'm using Interlocked.Increment instead of lock, it is faster. Look on google about Interlocked.Increment, it is a very good function: atomic increment.

share|improve this answer
    
tyvm for very detailed comment,after googling interlocked.increment i saw it much more faster then lock. but i left with 2 questions: 1)SynchronizationContext.Current,souhld i use this every time i use multithreading? 2)how ican know how much thread would give me the best performance? tyvm:) –  aliyaho Oct 31 '11 at 16:41
    
SynchronizationContext is a class that allow you to post functions as "messages" to other threads, for example, to the windows form thread. This will allow you to update the GUI from another thread. –  Salvatore Previti Oct 31 '11 at 16:46
    
About computing the number of threads... it depends... I don't know in your case. –  Salvatore Previti Oct 31 '11 at 16:47
    
I'm sorry in my post I left an error, i'm not using the SynchronizationContext there :) corrected now. –  Salvatore Previti Oct 31 '11 at 16:48

I agree with the other answers recommending the use of .NET thread-pool instead of starting new threads yourself. If you have the luxury of using .NET 4 or newer, I would go even further and recommend you use the Task Parallel Library (and even if you are not currently using .NET 4, building a task-oriented abstraction on top of .NET thread-pool is very simple).

One of the biggest advantages of using tasks IMHO is that they are the foundation of the coming C# 5 await built-in language feature. So if you use tasks for your background processing today, you are already preparing your program for the future :-).

To show how you can use tasks to solve your immediate problem, I wrote a simple WinForms program that illustrates the technique of doing background processing and updating a progress bar to track how many tasks have already finished:

// file "Program.cs"
using System;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.Linq;
using System.Threading;
using System.Threading.Tasks;
using System.Windows.Forms;

namespace ProgressDialog
{
    static class Program
    {
        [STAThread] static void Main()
        {
            // build UI
            Application.EnableVisualStyles();
            Application.SetCompatibleTextRenderingDefault(false);
            var rootForm = new Form { Text = @"Test Form", Width = 300, Height = 100 };
            var btn = new Button { Text = @"Start", Parent = rootForm, Dock = DockStyle.Top };
            var progress = new ProgressBar { Minimum = 0, Parent = rootForm, Dock = DockStyle.Top, Style = ProgressBarStyle.Continuous };
            new Label { Text = @"Progress:", Parent = rootForm, Dock = DockStyle.Top, AutoSize = true };


            // define parameters
            const int sourcesCount = 20; // how many sources do we want to process
            var completedCount = 0;
            var randomGenerator = new Random();
            var timer = new Stopwatch();


            // callback that will be invoked on UI thread each time a task finishes
            Action<int> onTaskCompleted = source =>
            {
                ++completedCount; // we're modifying "completedCount" closure on purpose
                progress.Value = completedCount;
                System.Diagnostics.Debugger.Log(0, null, string.Concat(@"UI notified that task for source ", source, @" finished; overall ", completedCount, @" tasks finished", Environment.NewLine));
                if (completedCount == sourcesCount)
                {
                    timer.Stop();
                    btn.Enabled = true;
                    btn.Text = string.Concat(@"Finished (took ", timer.ElapsedMilliseconds, @" milliseconds). Start again");
                }
            };


            // task itself (the hard part :) )
            Action<int> task = source =>
            {
                System.Diagnostics.Debugger.Log(0, null, string.Concat(@"  > Starting task for source ", source, Environment.NewLine));
                Thread.Sleep(randomGenerator.Next(100, 200)); // simulate some workload (taking between 100 and 200 milliseconds)
                System.Diagnostics.Debugger.Log(0, null, string.Concat(@"  < Finished task for source ", source, Environment.NewLine));
                rootForm.BeginInvoke(new Action(() => onTaskCompleted(source)));
            };


            // start button handler (kick-starts the background tasks)
            btn.Click += (src, args) =>
            {
                btn.Enabled = false;
                btn.Text = @"Running...";
                progress.Maximum = sourcesCount;
                progress.Value = 0;
                timer.Restart();

                completedCount = 0;
                var sources = Enumerable.Range(1, sourcesCount); // simulate getting data for each task
                var tasks = sources
                    .Select(s => Task.Factory.StartNew(() => task(s))) // at this point we only have an enumerable that is able to start all the tasks, nothing is running yet
                    .ToArray(); // now the tasks are started

                if (tasks.Length != sourcesCount) { throw new InvalidOperationException(); } // assert that we created one task for each source
            };


            // show the form now, let the user interact with it
            Application.Run(rootForm);
        }
    }
}

You can compile the program by either creating a new (console or winforms) project in Visual Studio and copying the code to Program.cs or by using the csc.exe on a command line.

When tasks are running, progress bar tracks number of finished tasks:

Running tasks

When all the tasks are finished, start button displays overall time taken:

Finished tasks

Note that the time taken by each task is random (between 100 and 200 milliseconds), and number of tasks running concurrently will depend on how many processors/cores you have available (Task Parallel Library does this automatically), so the time displayed will vary between runs.

Also note that diagnostic messages are sent to the "Output" view in Visual Studio when running the program in debug mode (or you can use the SysInternals DebugView to see them). One sample run on my (2-core) machine produced the following:

  > Starting task for source 1 
  > Starting task for source 2 
  > Starting task for source 3 
  < Finished task for source 3 
  > Starting task for source 4 
UI notified that task for source 3 finished; overall 1 tasks finished 
  < Finished task for source 2 
  > Starting task for source 5 
UI notified that task for source 2 finished; overall 2 tasks finished 
  < Finished task for source 1 
  > Starting task for source 6 
UI notified that task for source 1 finished; overall 3 tasks finished 
  < Finished task for source 4 
  > Starting task for source 7 
UI notified that task for source 4 finished; overall 4 tasks finished 
  < Finished task for source 5 
  > Starting task for source 8 
UI notified that task for source 5 finished; overall 5 tasks finished 
  < Finished task for source 6 
  > Starting task for source 9 
UI notified that task for source 6 finished; overall 6 tasks finished 
  < Finished task for source 8 
  > Starting task for source 10 
UI notified that task for source 8 finished; overall 7 tasks finished 
  < Finished task for source 7 
  > Starting task for source 11 
UI notified that task for source 7 finished; overall 8 tasks finished 
  < Finished task for source 9 
  > Starting task for source 12 
UI notified that task for source 9 finished; overall 9 tasks finished 
  < Finished task for source 10 
  < Finished task for source 11 
  > Starting task for source 13 
UI notified that task for source 10 finished; overall 10 tasks finished 
UI notified that task for source 11 finished; overall 11 tasks finished 
  > Starting task for source 14 
  < Finished task for source 14 
  > Starting task for source 15 
UI notified that task for source 14 finished; overall 12 tasks finished 
  < Finished task for source 13 
  > Starting task for source 16 
UI notified that task for source 13 finished; overall 13 tasks finished 
  < Finished task for source 12 
  > Starting task for source 17 
UI notified that task for source 12 finished; overall 14 tasks finished 
  < Finished task for source 16 
  > Starting task for source 18 
UI notified that task for source 16 finished; overall 15 tasks finished 
  < Finished task for source 15 
UI notified that task for source 15 finished; overall 16 tasks finished 
  > Starting task for source 19 
  < Finished task for source 17 
UI notified that task for source 17 finished; overall 17 tasks finished 
  < Finished task for source 18 
  > Starting task for source 20 
UI notified that task for source 18 finished; overall 18 tasks finished 
  < Finished task for source 19 
UI notified that task for source 19 finished; overall 19 tasks finished 
  < Finished task for source 20 
UI notified that task for source 20 finished; overall 20 tasks finished 
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As already mentioned by some, then use the ThreadPool instead of creating the threads yourself. By using the ThreadPool you don't have to worry about the number of threads to spawn - the ThreadPool will do that for you.

Assuming you're using .NET 4, you could take advantage of TPL:

public partial class Form1 : Form
{
    private volatile int count;
    private readonly int total;

    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();

        var urls = new List<string> { "http://something.com", "http://another.com" };
        total = urls.Count;

        // Execute the Parallel loop in a thread from the threadpool, 
        // in order not to block the UI thread.
        ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(o =>
        {
            Parallel.ForEach(urls, x => MakeRequest(x));
        });

        // other UI stuff here?
    }

    public void MakeRequest(string url)
    {
        // code for web request here...

        int newCount = Interlocked.Increment(ref count);
        Invoke(new Action(() => progressBar.Value = (100 * newCount) / total));
    }
}
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