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class Foo{
public:
    void Bar();
}

It doesn't have to be safe and I don't care about this pointer. I just need to get the address of Bar function located in the memory on x86

void *address = (void *)&(Foo::Bar) does not work.

void *address = (void *)(&Foo::Bar) does not work.

void *address = (void *)Foo::Bar does not work.

EDIT: Let me clarify this. Even it's theoretically illegal to cast a function pointer to an object because a functions may well be located in another memory space, in reality, they are the same. As I have mentioned earlier, it neither has to be safe, nor be legal. I've added x86 tag to the question. It only has to work on gcc, and MSVC on x86 architecture.

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Why do you want to take it in a void*? Can you not use function pointer? –  Alok Save Oct 31 '11 at 15:42
3  
Suppose Bar() is virtual. Consider how you would implement a member pointer. See, on sane platofrms that will never fit into a void*. –  sbi Oct 31 '11 at 15:50
1  
Related: How do I print the address of a method pointer in C++?. –  sbi Oct 31 '11 at 15:54
4  
@JosephH: Yes, but a member function type could point to a virtual function, so the underlying data structure needs to take this into account, even if you happen to assign a non-virtual function to it. –  sbi Oct 31 '11 at 15:56
2  
"in reality, they are the same" Says who? What authority do you have to state this? As the person asking the question, I'd say you're in the worst position to be arguing against people telling you otherwise. –  GManNickG Oct 31 '11 at 16:27

4 Answers 4

You don't and you can't. Pointers-to-member-function are not pointers (to objects, i.e they're not T* for any type T). They don't necessarily, and not even practically, fit into a void*.

The only thing you know about void* is that it is big enough to hold any object pointer. That's it. It's not even related to ordinary free function pointers. In a crunch, you can define a free-function analogue of a void pointer as typedef void(*voidf)();, but that's only for free functions. For pointers-to-member function there is no general such thing, as the precise implementation of the PTMF depends on the nature of the class (simple, polymorphic, virtually derived, ...).

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@Downvoter, care to explain the objection? –  Kerrek SB Oct 31 '11 at 15:48
    
Of course they are pointers, they just point to a different type. –  slartibartfast Oct 31 '11 at 15:48
    
@myrkos: Do an experiment Check the size of an pointer and size of an pointer to member function. –  Alok Save Oct 31 '11 at 15:50
2  
@myrkos: They're not pointers. They could be objects of some structs defined by the compiler. Those objects are not a pointers. So sizeof(such_object) may be different from sizeof(void*). –  Nawaz Oct 31 '11 at 15:50
3  
@JosephH: No, you're wrong. See my comment to the question. –  sbi Oct 31 '11 at 15:53
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Use x86 assembly:

On MSVC:

__asm{
    mov eax, (Foo::Bar);
    mov address, eax;
}

On g++:

__asm__ __volatile__("mov %1, %0":"=r"(address):"r"(&Foo::Bar));
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1  
I'd still like to know why you're doing this. –  GManNickG Oct 31 '11 at 23:28

You cannot cast a function pointer to a void pointer. Check the C++ faq for more details

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(-1) There is a difference between global function pointers and class function pointers ("methods"), they work different. –  umlcat Oct 31 '11 at 16:00
    
You are right. I edited my answer. –  pnezis Oct 31 '11 at 16:07

You cannot cast the address of an object function ("method") as a global "plain pointer".

In order to be called, a method requires the reference of the object.

if you have this:

class MyClass
{
  void Hello(char* AName) { ... }
}

void main()
{
  MyClass MyObject = new MyClass();
  MyObject->Hello("World");
  delete MyObject;
}

The program is, internally, doing something like this:

void main()
{
  MyClass MyObject = new MyClass();
  Hello(MyObject, "World");
  delete MyObject;
}

Why do you want to do that ?

You want the address of a method, as a solution for a problem.

What is your programming problem ? Maybe there is another way to solve it .

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Did you mean delete MyObject;, or is this some funky unusual syntax? –  RobH Oct 31 '11 at 16:06
    
@RobH Fixed. Its kind of difficult to remember each syntax, especially if daily job has to do with: C#, PHP, C++, at the same time :-s –  umlcat Oct 31 '11 at 16:20

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