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I know that part of the terminal output is duration of the request, time remaining, etc. But is there some documentation that specifies exactly what each column of the terminal output of a curl command is? The man page is very sparse as to what is there.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It is possibly not easy to find, but documented in this page. Quoted below for your convenience:

  The progress meter exists to show a user that something actually is
  happening. The different fields in the output have the following meaning:

  % Total    % Received % Xferd  Average Speed          Time             Curr.
                                 Dload  Upload Total    Current  Left    Speed
  0  151M    0 38608    0     0   9406      0  4:41:43  0:00:04  4:41:39  9287

  From left-to-right:
   %             - percentage completed of the whole transfer
   Total         - total size of the whole expected transfer
   %             - percentage completed of the download
   Received      - currently downloaded amount of bytes
   %             - percentage completed of the upload
   Xferd         - currently uploaded amount of bytes
   Average Speed
   Dload         - the average transfer speed of the download
   Average Speed
   Upload        - the average transfer speed of the upload
   Time Total    - expected time to complete the operation
   Time Current  - time passed since the invoke
   Time Left     - expected time left to completion
   Curr.Speed    - the average transfer speed the last 5 seconds (the first
                   5 seconds of a transfer is based on less time of course.)

  The -# option will display a totally different progress bar that doesn't
  need much explanation!
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Thanks, I was searching all over for that information. –  phileas fogg Oct 31 '11 at 20:44

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