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For some reason, I create my own stacks for all the threads in my application by using pthread_attr_setstack function before calling pthread_create. However, I also want to have a custom stack for my main thread. How can I achieve that?

If that is not possible, how can I at least get the stack address and size of the main thread?

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Since the main thread is created by the loader (shell, init, etc.), most likely by fork and execve, I'd hazard a guess that to do what you want you'd have to crawl into kernel space... –  Eli Iser Oct 31 '11 at 15:56
    
Could you say a few words about why you'd want to do that? This would help us to better understand the context and might lead to better answers. –  NPE Oct 31 '11 at 15:58
    
aix, that purpose is too difficult to explain here, but down under I need to know the stacks used by all the threads in my application. –  MetallicPriest Oct 31 '11 at 16:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

However, I also want to have a custom stack for my main thread.

You can't. Stack for main thread is created by OS elf loader. The size of main stack is not fixed statically (only upper limit does, via ulimit -s). OS will grow the stack each time when it is needed.

How can I achieve that?

You can only switch a stack by resetting %sp,%bp registers. You should do this very carefully and it will be better to reset them back before exiting.

If that is not possible, how can I at least get the stack address

You can estimate stack address by:

int main()
{
  int a;
  printf("Stackaddress is near %p\n", &a);
}

And you can read /proc/pid/maps file of your application and check the address range marked [stack]

and size of the main thread?

Size of the main stack is not fixed. This stack is almost empty (contains argv/envp/auxp - filled by OS) when program starts; and it will grow (not shrink) at every access to yet unused stack page. This is a special case of page fault, OS will detect that page fault looks like stack access and will give more physical pages into virtual address space of application.

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Since the main function is called before any thread-specific initialization is done, I don't think that you can influence its stack. However, you could simply write a wrapper for main that starts a thread to execute the usual code of main and then simply waits.

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