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My environment is Visual Studio 2010 with Resharper 6.0. I have a large website with many CSS files with many styles.

I would like to tidy these up as a lot of them are no longer used, I noticed that Resharper allows you to track usages but obviously this can miss out CSS class specifications in code-behind etc.

My only solution is to do a Find In Files in VS but obviously when you have a large amount of styles this proves too slow and cumbersome.

Has anyone had a similar predicament?

EDIT: It's worth mentioning that the site is a CMS comprising around 10,000 pages, so anything that requires browsing pages might also be a bit tricky.

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Upvoting and favoriting. Hope someone knows of a good tool! :D – bobber205 Oct 31 '11 at 16:44

There is a firefox extension called dust me selector that does this. You enable it and then navigate to each page. It keeps track of all used css. You spit out a new css file with all the tracked css styles.

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Too bad it's not supported for ff 7. :( – Amir Raminfar Oct 31 '11 at 16:11
    
Damn, that's too bad :-( – Mantorok Oct 31 '11 at 16:14
    
See my edit, this might not be feasible for a CMS solution. – Mantorok Oct 31 '11 at 16:24
    
I see your problem. I would hope there is a solution out there that just hits every page and looks at the styles. Let's see what others say. I would love to start the open source project. :) – Amir Raminfar Oct 31 '11 at 16:27
    
When you factor in things like server-side and client-side changes to classes it could be tricky to nail down every element, but you could aim for around 90% of them I guess. – Mantorok Nov 1 '11 at 9:14

The Web Essentials Visual Studio Extension has a BrowserLink feature which comes with a way to track unused css in your site while you browse around the site.

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Yes, I know, but I would like to separate the CSS entries in multiple files. Webessential can help in this? – Revious Sep 25 '14 at 15:06
    
@Revious, have you checked uncss already? – coma Sep 30 '14 at 10:11
    
@coma: I'm trying to use it, seems interesting. – Revious Sep 30 '14 at 10:13
    
@Revious addyosmani.com/blog/removing-unused-css – coma Sep 30 '14 at 10:13

A way to do that is running your site in a headless browser like PhantomJS and inspecting the styles applied in order to remove the ones not being used.

Fortunately, there is a nice tool built on node called uncss doing exactly this:

https://github.com/giakki/uncss

I found it here:

http://addyosmani.com/blog/removing-unused-css/

About browsing all those pages, well, I dunno, if you can generate all the possible URL's then you can automate the process.

Give it a try and let me know if it helps.

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