Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

To get a parent of a node in a heap sort array, the calculation would be (index - 1) / 2.

However, assume each node takes up 4 spaces in the array. To access a record/node, I must access the first position of the four of that record. So here's an example:

If a parent starts at position 4, the left child starts at position 12 and the right child starts at position 16. The equation to get the left child would be 2*position + 4 and the equation to get the right child would be 2*position + 8.

What would the equation be to get the parent though? I need one equation to get the parent of either the left child or the right child, the same way index-1/2 does. Would that be possible? If I need two separate equations, that wouldn't work since I don't really know if a record is a left or a right child.

Thank you,

share|improve this question
    
Erm, why would a node take 4 spaces? It takes one. – Brian Roach Oct 31 '11 at 16:35
    
Because that's how I want it.. I'm doing a modified version of heap sort that you don't have to worry about its details. – darksky Oct 31 '11 at 16:42
    
But you're asking for help with the details ;-) – phkahler Oct 31 '11 at 16:49
    
Not really.. Its kind of a mathematical/algorithm question regardless of how the details work. – darksky Oct 31 '11 at 17:30
up vote 0 down vote accepted

You should leave the first index (or, in this case, the first four indices) blank; this simplifies the calculations. So the root should be at 4-7, the root's children at 8-11 and 12-15, and so on. Given this, a node's parent is at index / 8 * 4. If you have to let the root be at 0-3, you can use (index + 4) / 8 * 4 - 4.

(However, you should consider wrapping the four related elements in a class so that it will be easier to work with them and you can handle a single array element at a time.)

share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't work. For the left child 12, 12/8*4 = 6 and for the right child 16, 16/8*4 = 8. The answer should be 4 for both. – darksky Oct 31 '11 at 16:45
    
Also, I can't wrap the four elements together because I am dealing with bytes on a file. – darksky Oct 31 '11 at 16:47
    
In integer division, 12/8 = 1. So 12/8 * 4 = 4. Don't do algebra, do what the computer does. – phkahler Oct 31 '11 at 16:52
    
@Nayefc: Like I said: if you have to have the root at 0-3, you must use (index + 4) / 8 * 4 - 4, and remember that an integer divided by an integer is an integer in Java. So (12 + 4) / 8 * 4 - 4 == 2 * 4 - 4 == 4, and (16 + 4) / 8 * 4 - 4 == 2 * 4 - 4 == 4. – Aasmund Eldhuset Oct 31 '11 at 16:54

Look at the following C# Min heap.

    public int GetParent(int i, out int index)
    {
        double element = i;
        index = (int)Math.Floor((element - 1)  / 2);

        if(index < 0)
        {
            return 0;
        }

        return _collection[index];
    }

This works for regular heap impl.

you can see the rest of the MinHeap implementation here.

Usually, heap structure is backed with an array and interestingly, heap wants to start from Array1 to make calculating parent and childs easy.

if you want to modify the child, parent as you mentioned in your problem, you should consider wrapping your 4 nodes in a node but keep how heap works the way it is

share|improve this answer
    
I am unable to wrap them in a class, since I am dealing with bytes. – darksky Oct 31 '11 at 16:47
    
ArrayList<Btye[]> ... – Brian Roach Oct 31 '11 at 18:20

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.