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We have an application that is launched through Web Start with a JNLP using the following to ensure application is run only with newest code:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<jnlp spec="6.0+"
 codebase="$$codebase" href="$$codebase/"app name...."jnlp">

  <update check="always" policy="prompt-run"/>
    <information>
      <title>title....</title>
      <vendor>vendor name...</vendor>
      <shortcut online="true">
        <desktop/>
       <menu submenu="@start.menu.title@" />
       </shortcut>
    </information>
 <security>
  <all-permissions/>
 </security>
 <resources>
    <!-- Application Resources -->
    <j2se version="1.6+"
      initial-heap-size="128m"
      max-heap-size="512m"
          href="http://java.sun.com/products/autodl/j2se"/>

    <jars....>
    <properties....>

  </resources>
   <application-desc
  name="name..."
     main-class="main class....">
   </application-desc>
</jnlp>

This works fine in most environments to notify of update and invoke download of new resources. However, in one test environment, the "mandatory update is available.." dialogue is shown on every launch of the application. After clicking the "OK" button though, the application downloads nothing and proceeds to run normally.

I haven't found any good documentation that tells what timestamp is being compared to determine if an update is available.

Any one else seen this issue or have any ideas or information to share?

Also, I saw a forum post on Oracle's site from a few months ago but with only a couple of postings and no answers. When I attempted to post a reply, the site went down (which seems to be a common occurrence with Oracle...).

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Maybe policy="prompt-run" is the problem. Try changing it to prompt-update –  Stephan Oct 31 '11 at 16:43
    
Supplement: For a good control over the update process, you should use the version tag. See download.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/technotes/guides/javaws/… –  Stephan Oct 31 '11 at 16:55
    
Well, if I'm not mistaken, with prompt-update the user has a choice to update or just run the cached version. On this application the project owners want to make sure that the user has the most up-to-date version. –  user622464 Oct 31 '11 at 17:49
    
Then <update check="always" policy="always"/> is your friend. –  Stephan Oct 31 '11 at 18:16
    
Yep! That's what I was thinking. However, they don't want me to get rid of the "Mandatory update..." message. They're afraid there's an underlying issue between the application and Web Start. Looks like I'm stuck to figure out why the check is showing an update is necessary. This is just the latest in a long list of issues related to Web Start and this application. –  user622464 Oct 31 '11 at 19:26
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1 Answer

in my case, i used:

<update check="always" policy="always" />

And it works without the warn when i don't have things to update.

Maybe it can help you too.

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