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I want to print a range of numbers to STDOUT. But rather than count from 0, 1 ,2 ... N-1, N, I want to iterate using breadth first search. I want to do this with the fewest/least intensive instructions possible (i.e. without branching).

For example, say the range is [1, 128]. I want to count like this:

64
32
96
16
87
...
128
1

Frankly, I don't care if it's breadth or depth first, or whatever. I just want a counting algorithm that covers the number line evenly, so that if the number line was a seesaw, it would be balanced from the beginning until the end of the algorithm.

And no, this isn't homework :-P

EDIT: Looking for something that is O(n) and doesn't rely on storing the whole list.

share|improve this question
    
Its not clear what you are trying to accomplish. The breadth first/depth first are tree-based search algorithms, but you mention simply printing a range. Are you looking at selecting random values given a range? – vishakvkt Oct 31 '11 at 16:46
    
@vishakvkt I'm not searching, I'm just counting. But not randomly. I want to give each part of the number line a fair chance to be counted with each step, if that makes sense. – Jay Oct 31 '11 at 16:53
    
@Justin: i don't get it... what is "each part"? and how do you get a fair chance with a fixed order? – Karoly Horvath Oct 31 '11 at 16:56
2  
@vishakvkt: I think he's trying to get the same output as if 0…N were put in a balanced binary tree and then output breadth-first. – derobert Oct 31 '11 at 16:59
    
Exactly what @derobert is saying. – Jay Oct 31 '11 at 17:08
up vote 7 down vote accepted

Sort the numbers using the reversed bits as the key.

This Python code demonstrates the concept:

>>> sorted(range(1,128), key=lambda x: ('{:08b}'.format(x))[::-1])
[64, 32, 96, 16, 80, 48, 112, 8, 72, 40, 104, 24, 88, 56, 120, 4, 68, 36, 100, 20, 84, 52, 116, 12, 76, 44, 108, 28, 92, 60, 124, 2, 66, 34, 98, 18, 82, 50, 114, 10, 74, 42, 106, 26, 90, 58, 122, 6, 70, 38, 102, 22, 86, 54, 118, 14, 78, 46, 110, 30, 94, 62, 126, 1, 65, 33, 97, 17, 81, 49, 113, 9, 73, 41, 105, 25, 89, 57, 121, 5, 69, 37, 101, 21, 85, 53, 117, 13, 77, 45, 109, 29, 93, 61, 125, 3, 67, 35, 99, 19, 83, 51, 115, 11, 75, 43, 107, 27, 91, 59, 123, 7, 71, 39, 103, 23, 87, 55, 119, 15, 79, 47, 111, 31, 95, 63, 127]

Looking at the bit patterns for each number shows how/why it works:

>>> '{:08b}'.format(64)
'01000000'
>>> '{:08b}'.format(32)
'00100000'
>>> '{:08b}'.format(96)
'01100000'

Note, the process can also be done on-the-fly, not requiring a sort:

>>> [int('{:07b}'.format(i)[::-1], 2) for i in range(1, 128)]
[64, 32, 96, 16, 80, 48, 112, 8, 72, 40, 104, 24, 88, 56, 120, 4, 68, 36, 100, 20, 84, 52, 116, 12, 76, 44, 108, 28, 92, 60, 124, 2, 66, 34, 98, 18, 82, 50, 114, 10, 74, 42, 106, 26, 90, 58, 122, 6, 70, 38, 102, 22, 86, 54, 118, 14, 78, 46, 110, 30, 94, 62, 126, 1, 65, 33, 97, 17, 81, 49, 113, 9, 73, 41, 105, 25, 89, 57, 121, 5, 69, 37, 101, 21, 85, 53, 117, 13, 77, 45, 109, 29, 93, 61, 125, 3, 67, 35, 99, 19, 83, 51, 115, 11, 75, 43, 107, 27, 91, 59, 123, 7, 71, 39, 103, 23, 87, 55, 119, 15, 79, 47, 111, 31, 95, 63, 127]

In C, reversing the bits is a trivial exercise:

long reverse(long x) {
    long result = 0:
    int i;

    for (i=0 ; i<32 ; i++) {
        result <<= 1;
        result |= x & 1;
        x >>= 1;
    }
    return result;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Bravo. You are a gentleman and a scholar. (+1) – Platinum Azure Oct 31 '11 at 16:55
    
Thanks. It's been a couple years since I did this in college. I know this works but I'm going to need to stare at a few more bit patterns to understand why. – Jay Oct 31 '11 at 17:01
1  
I wonder if there is a faster way—as this isn't particularly fast. You're spending a fair amount of time doing the bit reversal. Then the sort is probably O(n·log n). You could use O(n) sorts, but the constant term is probably fairly high with the small n's we're talking here... – derobert Oct 31 '11 at 17:03
    
On the fly is no problem: for (i=1 ; i<limit ; i++) { printf("%ld", reverse(i)); }. Just set the loop in reverse() to the number of bits needed. – Raymond Hettinger Oct 31 '11 at 17:13
1  
@Justin: If the limit is 64, then you should only use six bits for your counter. (8-bit numbers from 0 to 63 have the high two bits set, so when you reverse them, they are all divisible by 4.) – Nemo Oct 31 '11 at 17:42

Ok, I think this is doable with minimal data storage. This is only for completely balanced, filled-in trees. Extending it to one more element is easy (just print the extra last...), but more than that will take some more thought. Also, if your range isn't 1…N, but rather M…N, easy enough to just add M-1 to everything.

  1. The bottom row of the tree is 1, 1+2, 1+4, 1+6, etc.
  2. The second-from-bottom row of the tree is 2, 2+4, 2+8, etc.
  3. The third-from-bottom row of the tree is 4, 4+8, 4+16, etc.
  4. Etc.

So, for a 1..(N-1) tree, where N is a power of two, we can first compute the height of the tree using log₂(N). For convenience, let n = N-1. The example tree is N=16:

The first row (root) of the tree is ((n-1)/2)+1. Call this row 0. So you can go ahead and print that. The first element of the next row (row 1) is half of the first element of the previous row. And conveniently, the increment is the first value of the previous row. So for N=16, first element of row 2 = 4. You can print that. Next element is 4+8=12, which you can print. Since a row has 2*rownum elements, you're now done with row 0 (2**1 = 2) Next row starts out with half of what the previous row did, e.g. 2/2 = 2. It has 2**2 = 4 elements, with a increment of 4. So, 2, 6, 10, 14.

               8

      4                12

  2       6       10         14
1   3   5   7   9   11    13    15

Now, if you want 1…16, you could just tack the extra element on the bottom right, so you'd output it last.

Of course, instead of calling pow() all the time, you'd just multiply by 2 (which the compiler will turn to a bit-shift, if appropriate) to determine how many nodes this level. There are still going to be branches to test the loops, of course.

I should warn you that I haven't had enough tea yet today, so this may be clearly silly. But it seems to work. At least in my head :-D

share|improve this answer

Maybe you want Gray code

or a simple full period pseudo random number generator limited to your range

share|improve this answer
    
that was my first thought too, but his example pattern doesn't match the properties of it.. – Karoly Horvath Oct 31 '11 at 16:59
    
then the PNRG is certainly the least "biased" count – Doug Currie Oct 31 '11 at 17:00

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