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By reading on the posts online related to size_t and ptrdiff_t, I want to confirm the following:

  1. if the max size of an array is less than 1/2*(max number represent-able by size_t), I can safely use ptrdiff_t and check the relative distances between two pointers to the same object?(Since I was talking about array, "pointers to same object" means "pointers to same array").

  2. if I want to declare a variable that can represent the offset from another pointer, I better declare it as type ptrdiff_t ?

  3. How do I output variables of type size_t and ptrdiff_t in C and C++? Is the following correct: Cross platform format string for variables of type size_t?

  4. is uintptr_t is just another name for size_t OR it should be used as a separate type from size_t?

  5. is ssize_t and intptr_t another names for ptrdiff_t OR it has to be used differently?

I am starting to use gcc on Ubuntu. I just found out about these types when using someone else's codes.

ADDed: I do want to be able to use negative offsets. And any difference in using uintptr_t and intptr_t?

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Are _ptrdiff_t_ and ssize_t typos? –  Mooing Duck Oct 31 '11 at 16:45
    
@MooingDuck: ssize_t is a Posix type (for example, it's the return type of read and write). _ptrdiff_t_ does look like a typo. –  Mike Seymour Oct 31 '11 at 16:51
    
@MooningDuck: for ptrdiff_t I was just trying if it is italicized. just deleted _ around the word. –  Rich Oct 31 '11 at 16:57
    
@Mike: What is the difference between Posix type and regular type built in C or C++? Can I use them interchangeably? –  Rich Oct 31 '11 at 16:57
    
Seems to me that you're re-asking a bunch of questions that are already answered here, and then asking whether the answers are correct. What reason do you have to doubt the previous answers? What new question does this post ask? –  Rob Kennedy Oct 31 '11 at 17:03

3 Answers 3

up vote 15 down vote accepted

1: if the max size of an array is less than 1/2*(max number represent-able by size_t), I can safely use ptrdiff_t and check the relative distances between two pointers to the same object?

That will be the case if sizeof(size_t) <= sizeof(prtdiff_t). That will be the case in a sensible implementation, but there is no guarantee.

2: if I want to declare a variable that can represent the offset from another pointer, I better declare it as type ptrdiff_t ?

Yes, that is what the type is intended for.

3: How do I output variables of type size_t and ptrdiff_t in C and C++?

In C:

printf("%zu %td\n", size, ptrdiff);

In C++:

std::cout << size << ' ' << ptrdiff << '\n';

4: is uintptr_t is just another name for size_t OR it should be used as a separate type from size_t?

It should be regarded as a separate type. uintptr_t is an integer type that can contain any pointer value converted to an integer; it may not exist on some platforms.

5: is ssize_t and intptr_t anther name for ptrdiff_t OR it has to be used differently?

ssize_t is not a standard type as far as the C or C++ languages are concerned; it is defined by Posix as the type of some function arguments and return values. It would be best to use ptrdiff_t except when dealing directly with Posix functions.

intptr_t is intended for holding an integer representation of a pointer, not a difference between pointers. On some platforms, these may have different sizes, and intptr_t may not be defined at all, so they should not be used interchangeably.

I do want to be able to use negative offsets. And any difference in using uintptr_t and intptr_t?

Don't use either of these types to represent offsets; use ptrdiff_t. Use these types in special circumstances, when you want to convert pointers to their integer representations for some reason.

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1  
+1. You could use size_t instead of ptrdiff_t if you are only going to be dealing with positive offsets from a base pointer (which is often the case in the work I do). If you might need negative offsets, then ptrdiff_t is the correct type to use. –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 31 '11 at 17:18
    
ptrdiff_t might be different from intptr_t on some platforms; on many platforms, they will be represented by the same type. –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 31 '11 at 17:19
    
+1. This answer is correct in every detail. –  Nemo Oct 31 '11 at 17:35
    
@MikeSeymour: I realized my "evidence" has nothing to do with the pointer types, and more to do with ptrdiff_t. Nevermind –  Mooing Duck Oct 31 '11 at 17:47
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lol, so intptr_t is basically useless? –  Mehrdad Jan 9 '13 at 19:14

uintptr_t and intptr_t are big enough to hold any void* pointer value without loss of information. They need to be able to uniquely represent the address of any object in your program's entire address space -- including any byte within any object.

size_t is the type yielded by the sizeof operator; ptrdiff_t is the type yielded by subtracting two pointers. They only need to be big enough for a single object. (And it's possible to have an object so big that subtracting two pointers that point to opposite ends will overflow.)

Most current systems have a single monolithic address space, but C is designed to work on systems that don't. For example, on some systems the largest possible object might be a small fraction of the size of the entire address space -- and comparing or subtracting pointers to distinct objects, might be meaningless. (Think about a segmented addressing scheme, where pointer subtraction and comparison consider only the offset portion of the address.)

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Assuming _ptrdiff_t_ is a typo:

1) Yes. If the max size of an array is less than SIZE_MAX/2, You can safely use ptrdiff_t
2) Sometimes: ptrdiff_t is usually the differences between two pointers, while size_t is an offset. The important thing here is size_t is always positive, ptrdiff_t might be negative. Note that on some platforms, they may be vastly different sizes.
3) You output variables of type size_t and ptrdiff_t the same way you output any other variable type.

size_t a = 10;
ptrdiff_t b = 20;
printf("%u %d", ((unsigned int)a), ((int)b));
std::cout << a << b;

4) uintptr_t is an unsigned integer at least as big as an int*, to safely allow integer math on pointers. size_t is not guaranteed to be the same as far as I can tell.
5) ssize_t is a nonstandard C type, corresponding to ptrdiff_t. Use ptrdiff_t instead. (On platforms supporting the POSIX 1003.1-1996 API standard, which includes most Unix-like systems, a signed variant of size_t named ssize_t is available, which was not part of the ANSI or ISO C standards. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Size_t)

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I don't think ssize_t is non-standard for ptrdiff_t. It usually is used as a "byte count or error" return from read/write routines. –  user7116 Oct 31 '11 at 16:57
    
I know a platform where size_t is 16 bits but ptrdiff_t is 32 bits. Also, ssize_t is signed equivalent of size_t. It just so happens that on the originating platform it was the same underlying type as what would be used for ptrdiff_t. –  Joshua Oct 31 '11 at 16:57
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Danger: your printf doesn't work if sizeof(size_t) or sizeof(ptrdiff_t) > sizeof(int) [both are allowed]. Never pass size_t or ptrdiff_t to printf without casting them to base types first. –  Joshua Oct 31 '11 at 17:00
    
If I want to use an offset that can be both positive and negative, I should use ptrdiff_t? correct? I just edited my questions. There is a link to how to output these types. link. Is that peculiar format correct? –  Rich Oct 31 '11 at 17:05
    
ssize_t is a POSIX type; it is the value returned by read() and write() and related functions. –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 31 '11 at 17:20

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