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I am creating a simulator for an 8 bit processor in Java. It's architecture is really simple, just an 4 byte register and 256 byte main memory. I have already implemented a "hardware" stack, so the processor supports PUSH, POP and GET. The stack is filled backward from the last memory cell, so "normal" memory usage should start at cell 0. You don't have to reserve memory, the program is able to use the full 256 byte by default.

I am also creating a compiler for this processor which compiles from a simple language I invented. At the moment, every variable defined (I'm just supporting one 8-bit integer type) is assigned to one memory cell, starting with 0 and increasing. So I have a maximum of 256 (if the stack is empty) variables. Currently, I don't want to change this.

My next goal is to add the ability to use parameterless procedures without return type. Variables declared in the function should be freed before returning automatically. So where should I store the variables? I would create a "software" stack between my variables at the beginning and the "hardware" stack at the end of the memory. I first had the idea to use the hardware stack for this, but I want to use it for the calls and returns of methods itself. Is there a better solution than creating a second "software" stack?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Each function, when you call it, should create an activation frame/call stack on the stack, which includes space for the return address, any parameters, and any local variables that are created within the function. At the very least, an activation frame in your situation should contain the return address of the calling code. The extra data that comes into play is based on whether your function accepts parameters, and/or if it creates any variables that are local to the function. Your stack might look like this:

+------------------+
|  Return address  |
+------------------+
|   Parameter 0    |
+------------------+
|       ...        |
+------------------+
|   Parameter N    |
+------------------+
|   Local Var 0    |
+------------------+
|       ...        |
+------------------+
|   Local Var N    |   <--- Top of Stack
+------------------+

Since you already are using main memory for the stack, this is where the activation frame will also live. I'm assuming that your processor has a stack pointer which points to the top of the stack?

You could create two stacks but then you would need to decide where to put this stack and how much memory it should consume. Do you want to use half of main memory for the hardware stack and the other half for the software stack? This also means that you are limiting the number of nested calls (or even recursive) calls that you can make. Instead there is another method you can use to conserve memory usage. The way to do this is to include the parameters to your function after the call to the function (your assembler will have to do this):

+--------------+
|   JMP FUNC   | Call the function
+--------------+
|  Parameter 0 | <--- return address points here
+--------------+
|     ...      |
+--------------+
|  Parameter N |
+--------------+
| (other code) | <--- after function call, return address should be fixed to point here
+--------------+

This means that you will have to do a little more work inside the function to load up the parameters. If you recall, the return address is the first value on the stack. You can load this value and then index off that value to load up your parameters. Once you're done loading your parameters, you will need to adjust the value of your return address so that it points to code that starts after the parameters that you have defined.

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Oh yes, I have one.. Without it wouldn't work ;) Just got the idea to store just everything on the stack and treat the entry point of my program as method, too. That would make it much more simple. Thank you. –  Sibbo Oct 31 '11 at 16:55
    
Due to your large edits, for other people: With "Oh yes, I have one" I referred to the stack pointer. –  Sibbo Oct 31 '11 at 17:08

Keeping two stacks would certainly be nice, but then you're stuck with the decision of where to put the two stacks. Should hardware start at 255 and software at 127? This'd cut your effective memory space in half, and also cut your recursion depth in half since you'd only have at most 127 slots to put function calls into.

Interleaving the stacks - hardware at 255, and software at 254, with each subsequent value jumping by 2 spots solves the loss of memory range, but then you're still wasting memory if/when the stacks get unbalanced (10 queued hardware stack slots, 20 software slots used = 10 slots wasted), and have also cut your stack addressing space in half as well anyways

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I thought of the software stack starting after the global variables and growing in positive direction, so the stacks are pointing towards each other. –  Sibbo Oct 31 '11 at 17:00

There are probably several valid solutions. You could allocate the variables with the call/return data in the "hardware" stack, or you could implement a stack-like scheme for the "memory" such that the "top of memory" is stored on call and popped on return. And no doubt 2 or 3 other schemes.

A thing to think about is how to address "local" vs "global" data. You might need to add new "local addressing" opcodes, or some sort of base register scheme.

You might want to examine how it was done in the old Burroughs machines.

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Thank you. I decided to store everything created by a method on the stack and later I maybe will add globals. Thanks for the link, it'S great. –  Sibbo Oct 31 '11 at 17:06
    
I'm sure there's lots more on the net about the B machines, and about some others that would be of interest. Several small British machines were stack-oriented to one degree or another, though the names aren't coming to me right now. –  Hot Licks Oct 31 '11 at 17:14

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