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Odd question: I'm building a static library with Visual Studio and I'm using a source file with a list of utility functions that I also use in the executable project that is importing the static library. As a result I'm getting errors like this:

4>newfuncs.lib(util.obj) : error LNK2005: _shift_left already defined in util.obj
4>newfuncs.lib(util.obj) : error LNK2005: _chop already defined in util.obj
4>newfuncs.lib(util.obj) : error LNK2005: _crc_begin already defined in util.obj
4>newfuncs.lib(util.obj) : error LNK2005: _crc_update already defined in util.obj
4>newfuncs.lib(util.obj) : error LNK2005: _crc_result already defined in util.obj
4>newfuncs.lib(util.obj) : error LNK2005: _strtok_r already defined in util.obj

Anyone know how I could figure out how to get Visual Studio to NOT export the functions in util.obj, since those are natively present in the actual executable project.

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Are you building a static library or a DLL? Your title and question disagree. –  Adam Rosenfield Oct 31 '11 at 17:26
    
My mistake: I'm generating static libraries. My runtime library settings are /MT and /MTd. –  Femi Oct 31 '11 at 17:43
    
/MT and /MTd are about which C and C++ runtime libraries you link to (static or dynamic). They have nothing to do with whether the library you're making is static or dynamic. –  Adrian McCarthy Oct 31 '11 at 21:29
    
Ah, that was intended to clarify that ALL my libraries are generated with the same settings: I've had similar problems when I mix /MT and /MD libraries, but that isn't what is happening in this case. –  Femi Nov 1 '11 at 3:29

2 Answers 2

  • The simple answer is to pull the functions in util.obj into their own library and have your library and the executable link it.
  • If you only need the utility functions in a single source file, you can move them into the .c file and declare them static, then they won't have any linkage outside the file they're defined in.
  • If you really want to do it by not exporting symbols, mark the function with __declspec(selectany), which will tell VS that multiple definitions of the function are equivalent and it's free to choose whichever it likes (make sure they're actually the same!).
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Meh. I was hoping to avoid generating yet another library, but I'm afraid you might be right. Was hoping for a magic flag that would prevent the functions from being added to the export table. –  Femi Oct 31 '11 at 17:47
    
It's bad practice to have the code copy and pasted in two places anyways. The definitions will fall out of sync because you'll remember to fix a bug in one but not the other, or a coworker will only know about one of the definitions and fix just that one. –  Joseph Garvin Oct 31 '11 at 21:06
up vote 1 down vote accepted

So, figured it out: if you use the pragma statement it will integrate the functions into your static library. In my case I put:

#pragma comment(lib, "libev.lib")

in a header and it imported libev into my library. Now when I actually wrote my executable I only needed to link against my library: there is no additional libev dependency.

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