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I'm trying to pass a command to an element in a WPF user control.

<UserControl x:Class="MyApp.MyControl"
         xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
         xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml">
    <!-- shortened -->
    <Button Command="{Binding Command}">
        <Button.Content>
            <!-- shortened -->
        </Button.Content>
    </Button>
</UserControl>
public partial class MyControl : UserControl
{
   public static readonly DependencyProperty CommandProperty
      = DependencyProperty.Register("Command", 
                                           typeof(ICommand), typeof(MyControl));
   //shortened        
   public ICommand Command
   {
      get { return (ICommand)GetValue(CommandProperty); }
      set { SetValue(CommandProperty, value); }
   }
   //shortened
} 
<uc:MyControl Command="{Binding DoStuffCommand}" />  <!-- shortened -->

When the button in the user control is clicked, nothing happens.
When I debug, the Command property is null.
Binding the command to a button outside of the user control does work.
What's going wrong here?

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3 Answers 3

The default DataContext for your Button is your UserControl's DataContext, not your UserControl, so you are trying to bind to DataContext.Command instead of UserControl.Command

To bind to UserControl.Command, use a RelativeSource binding

<Button Command="{Binding Command, RelativeSource={
        RelativeSource AncestorType={x:Type local:MyControl}}}">  

EDIT Just noticed HB's answer, which would also work. Usually I prefer RelativeSource bindings to ElementName ones because sometimes I rename items and used to forget what other controls reference that item by Name

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I forgot to mention that the user control constructor looks like this: code public MyControl() { InitializeComponent(); DataContext = this; } code Another binding element, a string field works just fine, it's the command that won't work. Am I simming something? –  David Nov 2 '11 at 10:01
    
Also as I mentioned the Command property in the user control is null when debugged. The command does exist and binding it to a button in stead of the user control does work. –  David Nov 2 '11 at 10:20
    
@David Does the command work correctly if you use the RelativeSource binding I have in my answer instead of the simple binding you have in your question? –  Rachel Nov 2 '11 at 13:31
    
nop, no cigar :) –  David Nov 2 '11 at 16:09
    
@David Use a tool like Snoop on your application while it is running and take a look at what the DataContext for both your UserControl and your Button. It can probably give you a clue as to where your binding is failing. snoopwpf.codeplex.com –  Rachel Nov 2 '11 at 16:20

Name the control and use ElementName:

<UserControl ...
             Name="control">
    <Button Command="{Binding Command, ElementName=control}">
    <!-- ... -->
share|improve this answer
    
Please view the reply on Rachel's post –  David Nov 2 '11 at 10:06

Well, I would just bind to the command from the host control/window. Because the data context will be inherited from it. Something like this.

<UserControl x:Class="MyApp.MyControl" 
         xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation" 
         xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"> 
    <!-- shortened --> 
    <Button Command="{Binding DoStuffCommand}"> 
        <Button.Content> 
            <!-- shortened --> 
        </Button.Content> 
    </Button> 
</UserControl>

Then you can remove the dependency property code from the code-behind file.

And remove the command property binding,

<uc:MyControl />
share|improve this answer
    
Bad idea because the UserControl might not necessarily have a DoStuffCommand in it's DataContext –  Rachel Oct 31 '11 at 18:13
    
Obviously if the property is not there for the data context it would not work. However, I disagree that it is a bad idea. You would need more information to determine if it is really a bad idea. I was just trying to provide a solution to the problem. –  Brad Oct 31 '11 at 18:52
    
I guess its not a problem if you expect this UserControl to always be used with a specific ViewModel, however I feel it's a bad idea if this UserControl is part of a Control library –  Rachel Oct 31 '11 at 18:57
1  
I can understand that. I also think the simplfied data binding expression and removing the depencey property from the user control code-behind actually makes it less complex which I like. –  Brad Oct 31 '11 at 19:07

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