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Is there anything like a "Call constraint" for C# ?

For instance i have the following function:

public UInt16 ConvertByteToUInt16 (byte[] buffer)
{
   if (buffer.Length != 2)
   {
       throw new InvalidArgumentException(); 
   }

   Convert();
}

Is it possible to write something like:

public UInt16 ConvertByteToUInt16 (byte[] buffer) : where (buffer.Lenght = 2)
{
    Convert();       
}

And if i call the function like that:

ConvertByteToUInt16 (new byte[] { 0xFF, 0xFF, 0xFF } )

I would like to get an error at compile time. I am quite sure nothing like that exists on C# 2.0, but maybe on C# 4.0 ? Thanks in advance.

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1  
Why don't you just make it a method that accepts exactly 2 byte arguments? –  BoltClock Oct 31 '11 at 18:16
1  
You might want to look at Code Contracts: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/devlabs/dd491992 –  driis Oct 31 '11 at 18:18
    
BoltClock: his example reflects a constraint of two or more, not just two. –  Corey Ogburn Oct 31 '11 at 18:20
2  
You would not ever be able to receive a compile time error with this type of check anyway, as the program must run to know what the length of the byte[] buffer value is. If you want to know more about why this isn't possible, read up on the halting problem: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Halting_problem –  Nathan Anderson Oct 31 '11 at 18:24
1  
@NathanAnderson has it right. While it may seem trivial in the case of passing in a static array like in the example, if you were passing in an array stored in a variable, perhaps constructed from the contents of a file, there's no way the compiler could possibly know that that array variable contains 2 elements only. –  siride Oct 31 '11 at 18:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can't do this in standard .NET. You need to manually check, then throw an appropriate exception:

public UInt16 ConvertByteToUInt16 (byte[] buffer)
{
    if (buffer.Length != 2)
        throw new ArgumentException("buffer needs to be of length 2", "buffer");
    Convert();       
}    
share|improve this answer

It's not possible as far as i know.

You can think about DBC (design by contract), (pre condition, post condition, invariants)

There is good example: http://www.codeproject.com/KB/cs/designbycontract.aspx

share|improve this answer
    
(a) You're making them pass in a new argument for something that is really a constant, which is proven by (b) you throwing an exception stating the value has to be 2 when (c) the user could really pass in 10 and not get the exception as long as the byte array length was also 10. –  Anthony Pegram Oct 31 '11 at 18:23
    
Good point, my example is useless (already fixed), he definitly should use constant. –  Kamil Lach Oct 31 '11 at 18:27

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